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Submission + - Microsoft not dropping Hotmail name

EveryNickIsTaken writes: CNET is reporting that despite planning for months to ditch the name "Hotmail" for "Windows Live Mail," Microsoft will keep the Hotmail name, renaming the service "Windows Live Hotmail." Along with the slight name change, MS will be modifying the interface to look more like Outlook's GUI.

A quote from Senior Product Mgr. Richard Sim:

"By adopting the name 'Windows Live Hotmail,' we believe we're bringing together the best of both worlds — new and old. We're able to offer the great new technology that Windows Live has to offer, while also bringing the emotional connection many existing and loyal users have with Hotmail."

Submission + - Analyst: flash and bigger screens for Video iPod

An anonymous reader writes: Apple may replace the 1.8 inch hard disk it uses in its video iPod with NAND flash memory before the end of the year, according to an analyst at Prudential Equity Group (a subsidiary of Prudential Financial). The analyst also predicts bigger screens, Wi-Fi and GPS.

Submission + - Turner Broadcasting to pay $2 million for ATHF ad

elmedico27 writes: is reporting that "Turner Broadcasting System Inc. and Interference Inc. have agreed to pay $2 million" for the recent bomb scare in Boston resulting from the placement of LED signs featuring characters from the Adult Swim cartoon Aqua Teen Hunger Force. Is this an overreaction by authorities? Or should Turner be sent the bill for the emergency response?

Submission + - Migrating a Production Database

markmcb writes: "I admin a site that I authored about three years ago in PHP and MySQL, when I knew just enough about both to be dangerous. For a variety of reasons, my team has decided to switch our code to Ruby on Rails. We have two options: build a Rails-friendly database schema from scratch and migrate old data later, or emend the old database and PHP code enough so that it's Rails-friendly, launch the Rails app on top of it, and then migrate the old database to an optimal state. Obviously option 2 is the sexier choice because it allows us to maintain all of our data using Rails or PHP with no outage and would be fall-back ready should something go wrong. However, it's more than trivial as our old database lacks simple things like join tables and would require a lot of work to prep for Rails. What has been your experience with database schema migrations, especially from terrible schemata to 'better' ones? Any tips or best practices? Did you handle yours in a framework like Rails, or use low-level SQL scripts to manage the change?"

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