Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Slashdot videos: Now with more Slashdot!

  • View

  • Discuss

  • Share

We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

×

Comment: Re:I'm all for this (Score 1) 299

I must point out that "the 10 tallest NBA players ever" and "the 10 best NBA centers ever" are disjoint sets.

Tru 'dat, however "10 totally average-height individuals" is also disjoint. If you wanted your children to even have a likely chance, height is certainly desirable in this case. Being 8 ft. tall versus 7'1" might not help a whole lot, but being 7' vs. 5'10" will.

Comment: Re: I.D. (Score 1) 95

by bazmonkey (#49105007) Attached to: Humans' Big Brains Linked To a Small Stretch of DNA
It should also be considered that for many animals, a gradual increase in intelligence and brain mass isn't much of an advantage. What would a smart cow do differently? I would argue that it was not until our ancestors were 1) standing with two very dexterous spare limbs to play with, and 2) out of our natural environment where there isn't food a-plenty, that even small increases in intelligence was a big advantage. We needed to hunt (communicate and coordinate), and we had the dexterity and capability to carry items over distance that made intelligence worthwhile.

Comment: Re: I.D. (Score 1) 95

by bazmonkey (#49104999) Attached to: Humans' Big Brains Linked To a Small Stretch of DNA
It should also be considered that for many animals, a gradual increase in intelligence and brain mass isn't much of an advantage. What would a smart cow do differently? Would a mouse be able to use tools even if it knew how to make them? Even apes smart enough to use many tools can't do so effectively because they simply lack the fine motor skills to execute. I would argue that it was not until our ancestors were 1) standing with two very dexterous spare limbs to play with, and 2) out of our natural environment where there isn't food a-plenty, that even small increases in intelligence was a big advantage. We needed to hunt (communicate and coordinate), and we had the dexterity and capability to carry items over distance that made intelligence worthwhile.

Comment: Re:(looks straight down) (Score 2) 122

by bazmonkey (#49094381) Attached to: The Science of a Bottomless Pit

The water near the center would boil, bubbling up through the water higher up in the tunnel to create a steady plume of steam at the surface. This would end up as increased cloud cover and precipitation over large parts of the world.

Really? I would think it would cool somewhere on the way up. Volcanic activity on the ocean floor that boils water doesn't make it to the surface as steam.

Comment: Re:What did I miss? (Score 2, Insightful) 212

by bazmonkey (#49000175) Attached to: The Search For Neutrons That Leak Into Our World From Other Universes
Hear hear. Moreover, unless I'm mistaken, shielding is the sort of thing where, every once in a while, a neutron can manage to get through... right? Is this accounted for somehow, or is this not the case?

What ensures the detected neutron isn't just some other neutron?

Comment: Re: a better question (Score 1, Troll) 592

by bazmonkey (#48844887) Attached to: Why Run Linux On Macs?
Almost exactly (hehe, see that?) what I settled on. I like OSX. It is arguably the most polished, coherent desktop OS out there. Sure, Linux understands multitouch... but it doesn't use it most places, programs don't know what to do with it. However, I work with HPC. I much much prefer to dev in Linux for that. An all-inclusive package manager is invaluable here. Yosemite has this thing where a maximized window is treated like a separate desktop. So I full screen a VM of Linux (and I have several) and it's presented as just another desktop. One little swipe of the touchpad and I can go in between them. I get the perks of OSX (battery life, compatibility with some apps I need for the workplace, etc.) and the benefits of Linux (dev ease, stronger control of the system) AND the benefit of my work being in a snapshottable VM. Truth be told, I'm actually sitting in the VM most of the time.

Comment: Re: What the hell is wrong with Millennials?! (Score 3, Insightful) 465

by bazmonkey (#48589771) Attached to: Peru Indignant After Greenpeace Damages Ancient Nazca Site

At the heigh of WWII the Nazi party had 8 million members. That's .4 per cent of the world population of 2 billion. No where near "a good chunk."

The original post blindly labeled my entire generation as hipster, gentrifying assholes. The same argument comes to mind.

Consultants are mystical people who ask a company for a number and then give it back to them.

Working...