Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Slashdot videos: Now with more Slashdot!

  • View

  • Discuss

  • Share

We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

×

+ - Linux-based Mobile Manipulation Robots Due Soon->

Submitted by DeviceGuru
DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "Silicon Valley startup Fetch Robotics, which just announced $3 million in VC funding, plans to ship two mobile manipulation robots running ROS on Linux in the second quarter, targeting logistics and light industrial applications. The company, whose core team hails from seemingly-defunct Willow Garage spinoff Unbounded Robotics, was originally named FYS (Fetch Your Stuff), hinting that the company intends to compete with the Kiva robots that currently speed-up human workers at Amazon's fulfillment centers."
Link to Original Source

+ - Linaro Launches an Open-source Spec for ARM SBCs->

Submitted by DeviceGuru
DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "Not content to just standardize ARM-based Linux and Android software, Linaro has just launched 96Boards, an open-source spec for ARM-based single board computers. Along with the spec's rollout, Linaro also announced a $129 HiKey SBC based on a HiSilicon 64-bit, octa-core Kirin 620 SoC, and compatible with the 96Boards Consumer Edition (CE) spec's 85 x 54mm 'standard' form factor option. The 96Boards initiative plans to offer a series of specs for small-footprint 32- and 64-bit Cortex-A boards, including an Enterprise Edition (EE) of its spec in Q2."
Link to Original Source

+ - Embedded Linux Conference Hijacked by Drones->

Submitted by DeviceGuru
DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "The Linux Foundation has released the full agenda for its annual North American Embedded Linux Conference + Android Builders Summit, which takes place Mar. 23-25 in San Jose, Calif. The ELC, which this year is titled Drones, Things, and Automobiles, increasingly reflects new opportunities for Linux in areas such as drones, robots, automotive computers, IoT gizmos, 3D sensing, modular phones, and much more. For those worried that ELC is skimping on the basics as it explores the more colorful sides of Linux, worry not, as there are still plenty of sessions on booting, trace analysis, NAND support, PHY frameworks, power management, defragmenting, systemd, device tree, and toolchain."
Link to Original Source

+ - Tiny Fanless Mini-PC Runs Linux or Windows on Quad-core AMD SoC->

Submitted by DeviceGuru
DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "CompuLab has unveiled a tiny 'Fitlet' mini-PC that runs Linux or Windows on a dual- or quad-core 64-bit AMD x86 SoC (with integrated Radeon R3 or R2 GPU), clocked at up to 1.6GHz, and offering extensive I/O, along with modular internal expansion options. The rugged, reconfigurable 4.25 x 3.25 x 0.95 in. system will also form the basis of a pre-configured 'MintBox Mini' model, available in Q2 in partnership with the Linux Mint project. To put things in perspective, CompuLab says the Fitlet is three times smaller than the Celeron Intel NUC."
Link to Original Source

+ - Ringing in 2015 With 40 Linux-Friendly Hacker SBCs->

Submitted by DeviceGuru
DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "As seen in this year-end summary of 40 hacker-friendly SBCs, 2014 brought us plenty of new Linux and Android friendly single-board computers to tinker with — ranging from $35 bargains, to octa-core powerhouses. Many of the new arrivals feature 1-2GHz multicore SoCs, 1-2GB RAM, generous built-in flash, gigabit Ethernet, WiFi, on-board FPGAs, and other extras. However, most of the growth has been in the sub-$50 segment, where the Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone reign supreme, but are now being challenged by a growing number of feature-enhanced clones, such as the Banana Pi and Orange Pi. Best of all, there's every reason to expect 2015 to accelerate these trends."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Clarifying quotation (Score 1) 31

by DeviceGuru (#48660569) Attached to: Quadcopter Drone Packs First All-Linux Autopilot
From the full article, but with added bolding:

...The Linux port of APM involved compiling the Linux kernel with some options that make it “pseudo-real time,” wrote Mayoral Vilches. “It responds nicely to the higher priority threads that APM launches,” he added. “The fact that the APM autopilot runs in Linux means that we can now have flying computers with a state-of-the-art software autopilot that are easier than ever to use. The big community of Linux experts can now jump into creating practical applications with their flying computers easier, without the need of interacting with a highly complicated system such as NuttX-based autopilots.”...

Víctor Mayoral Vilches is CTO and co-founder of Erle Robotics.

+ - Quadcopter Drone Packs First All-Linux Autopilot->

Submitted by DeviceGuru
DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "Erle Robotics has launched what is claimed to be the first drone to run both a Pixhawk APM autopilot and ROS directly on Linux. Over the last year Erle Robotics and 3DRobotics have collaborated on developing an open source, all-Linux BeagleBone Black-based autopilot for drones using the popular 3DR APM architecture, but without using Nuttx RTOS for the real-time bits. In addition to being used on a new 'Erle-copter' quadcopter drone, the new all-Linux 'Erle-brain' APM will ship in both a two-winged UAV and a four-wheeled robotic vehicle, due next spring."
Link to Original Source

+ - $35 Quad-core Hacker SBC Offers Raspberry Pi-like Size And I/O->

Submitted by DeviceGuru
DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "Hardkernel has again set its sites on the Raspberry Pi with a new $35 Odroid-C1 hacker board that matches the RPI's board size and offers a mostly similar 40-pin expansion connector. Unlike the previous $30 Odroid-W that used the same Broadcom BCM2835 SoC as the Pi and was soon cancelled due to lack of BCM2835 SoC availability, the Odroid-C1 is based on a quad-core 1.5GHz Cortex-A5 based Amlogic S805 SoC, which integrates the Mali-400 GPU found on Allwinner's popular SoCs. Touted advantages over the similarly priced Raspberry Pi Model B+ include a substantially more powerful processor, double the RAM, a extra USB2.0 port that adds Device/OTG, and GbE rather than 10/100 Ethernet. More info is at Odroid-C1 product page."
Link to Original Source

+ - Open Source "Dronecode" UAV Platform Project Launches->

Submitted by DeviceGuru
DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "The Linux Foundation launched a collaborative Dronecode Project aimed at creating a shared open source platform for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). The key member of the collaborative project is 3D Robotics, which is contributing technology from its widely used APM platform for UAV autopilots, formerly called ArduPilot. The Dronecode project will also incorporate technology from the PX4 project, and Intel, Qualcomm, Baidu, Box, and seven smaller companies more closely tied to UAVs are also members of the new initiative. Although there was no mention of Linux in the announcement, 3D Robotics has been busy porting APM to Linux over the last year, so it's presumed that Dronecode will also encompass the Linux version of APM when it appears, but the main focus initially appears to be on the current Nuttx/Arduino version. More details are at Dronecode.org."
Link to Original Source

+ - Firefox OS Media Casting Stick Strikes Kickstarter Gold->

Submitted by DeviceGuru
DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "The first Firefox OS based media player has arrived on Kickstarter, in the form of a $25 open-spec HDMI stick called Matchstick that supports Chromecast-like content casting. The device, which has already zoomed past its Kickstarter campaign's $100,000 funding goal with 28 days still remaining, was teased back in June by Mozilla developer evangelist Christian Heilmann. Like the Chromecast, the Matchstick, a product of startup Matchstick.tv, also supports the DIAL media-casting protocol created by Netflix and popularized by Google’s Chromecast. You can cast content to the device from Android, iOS, and Firefox OS phones, as well as from any device running Chrome or Firefox browsers. The Matchstick is said to be binary compatible with many existing Chromecast apps, and most additional Chromecast apps can be recompiled and ported in a process that usually takes less than an hour, claims Matchstick.tv."
Link to Original Source

+ - Digia Spins off Qt as Subsidiary->

Submitted by DeviceGuru
DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "Digia has spun off a subsidiary called The Qt Company to unify Qt's commercial and open source efforts, and debuted a low-cost plan for mobile developers. The Linux-oriented Qt cross-platform development framework has had a tumultuous career, having been passed around Scandinavia over the years from Trolltech to Nokia and then from Nokia to Digia. Yet, Qt keeps rolling along in both commercial and open source community versions, continually adding support for new platforms and technologies, and gaining extensive support from mobile developers. Now Qt is its own company, or at least a wholly owned subsidiary under Digia. Finland-based Digia has largely been involved with the commercial versions of Qt since it acquired the platform from Nokia in 2012, but it has also sponsored the community Qt Project as a relatively separate project. Now, both efforts are being unified under one roof at The Qt Company and the new QT.io website, says Digia. Meanwhile, Digia will focus on its larger enterprise software business."
Link to Original Source

+ - MIPS Tempts Hackers with Raspbery Pi-like Dev Board-> 1

Submitted by DeviceGuru
DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "In a bid to harness the energy and enthusiasm swirling around today’s open, hackable single board computers, Imagination Technologies, licensor of the MIPS ISA, has unveiled the Creator C120 development board, the ISA's counter to ARM's popular Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone Black SBCs. The MIPS dev board is based on a 1.2GHz dual-core MIPS32 system-on-chip and has 1GB RAM and 8GB flash, and there's also an SD card slot for expansion. Ports include video, audio, Ethernet, both WiFi and Bluetooth 4.0, and a bunch more. OS images are already available for Debian 7, Gentoo, Yocto, and Arch Linux, and Android v4.4 is expected to be available soon. Perhaps the most interesting feature of the board is that there's no pricing listed yet, because the company is starting out by giving the boards away free to developers who submit the most interesting projects."
Link to Original Source

+ - Emulator Brings x86 Linux Apps to ARM Devices->

Submitted by DeviceGuru
DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "Eltechs announced a virtual machine that runs 32-bit x86 Linux applications on ARMv7 hardware. The ExaGear VM implements a virtual x86 Linux container on ARMv7 computers and is claimed to be 4.5 times faster than QEMU, according to Eltechs. The VM is based on binary translation technology and requires ARMv7, which means it should run on mini-PCs and SBCs based on Cortex-A8, A7, A9, and A15 processors — but sadly, it won’t run on the ARM11 (ARMv6) SoC found on the Raspberry Pi. It also does not support applications that require kernel modules. It currently requires Ubuntu (v12.04 or higher), but will soon support another, unnamed Linux distro, according to Eltechs, which is now accepting half price pre-orders without payment obligation."
Link to Original Source

+ - Project Aims to Build a Fully Open SoC and Dev Board->

Submitted by DeviceGuru
DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "A non-profit company is developing an open source 64-bit system-on-chip that will enable fully open hardware, 'from the CPU core to the development board.' The 'lowRISC' SoC is the brainchild of a team of hardware and software hackers from the University of Cambridge, with the stated goal of implementing a 'fully open computing eco-system, including the instruction set architecture (ISA), processor silicon, and development boards.' The lowRISC's design is based on a new 64-bit RISC-V ISA, developed at UC Berkeley. The RISC-V core design has now advanced enough for the lowRISC project to begin designing an SoC around it. Prototype silicon of a 'RISC-V Rocket' core itself has already been benchmarked at UC Berkeley, with results results (on GitHub) suggesting that in comparison to a 32-bit ARM Cortex-A5 core, the RISC-V core is faster, smaller, and uses less power. And on top of that it's open source. Oh, and there's a nifty JavaScript-based RISC-V simulator that runs in your browser."
Link to Original Source

+ - Android Motorcycle Helmet/HUD Gains Funding->

Submitted by DeviceGuru
DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "Skully Systems has achieved Indiegogo funding for a high-tech Android 4.4 based motorcycle helmet with a head-up display (HUD), GPS navigation, and a 180-degree rearview camera. The Skully AR-1 helmet launched on Indiegogo on Aug. 10 and quickly blasted past its $250,000 flexible funding goal and has already surpassed $900,000 in funding. The helmet runs a heavily modified version of Android 4.4, with both screen size and safety in mind, according to Skully’s Tow. 'You should not think of it as being Android as seen in a phone; it doesn’t run the same skin,' wrote Tow on the Skully forum page. 'You instead should think of it as a variant of Linux, not Android per se. What counts is the device drivers, graphics rendering for our turn by turn directions and vehicle telemetry, etc. More nerdy things like communication over the I2C bus to the image processing module.' Helmets are available starting at $1,399, with shipments due in May 2015."
Link to Original Source

You are false data.

Working...