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Comment: Re:Telegram (Score 0) 82

by Coniptor (#48426767) Attached to: WhatsApp To Offer End-to-End Encryption

Please google OSI and look into "Open Source" that's a capital O and a capital S!
Please also google FSF and look into "Free Software".
Again a capital F and a capital S.
The capitals !@#$@!# matter!
Public Domain does not == Open Source, There is no such thing as open source.
Or are you just trolling!?

Public Domain is public domain. Copyright has expired or been forfeit in order to put it, what ever it is, into the public domain.
With Free Software and Open Source software someone holds the attribution to the rights of the work.

Comment: Re:HTTPS Everywhere (Score 0) 206

by Coniptor (#48234959) Attached to: Verizon Injects Unique IDs Into HTTP Traffic

You are correct that they do not come right out and say that in the faq. I'm not sure if they did in the past.
However in the FAQ at:
https://slashdot.org/faq
At section Subscriptions with question:
Why subscribe to Slashdot? Can't I read for free?
You find the link:
https://slashdot.org/faq#subsc...
That takes you further down the page with more details where as you said it does not mention this.
*It is an unmentioned plum.*

While you are logged into your account observe on the upper right where I expect you have your Slashbox.
If you don't then go enable it.
With that enabled you have the default content that goes in your Slashbox and it lists your current Karma.
Mine has been Bad since I think about 2007. Haven't seen a mod point sense.
Below Karma you have three links:
Journal Subscription Account

Subscription is this link:
https://slashdot.org/subscribe...

Where in you read:
Absolutely nothing about this!?
Hrm. I could have sworn I read about this and didn't just figure it out on my own.

Okay they either covered this before and removed it. Not sure and don't know why they would do that.
Or I read this in a post several years ago and just assumed everyone I've been reading complain about this just didn't want to subscribe.
I subscribed a few years ago and wanted encryption and also had trouble with this feature due to redirects.
I resolved this by putting
*slashdot.org*
in my forced HTTPS NoScript settings and then added
slashdot.org/my/login
into the whitelist for the never force https list.
Anytime my session/cookie expires I put in slashdot.org/my/login and then get redirected to a https slashdot url.
Hope that helps you and many others and that they don't degrade this for some reason!?

+ - GamerGate May Have Been an Op

Submitted by Bob9113
Bob9113 (14996) writes "Casey Johnston at Ars Technica has a story on GamerGate: "A set of IRC logs released Saturday appear to show that a handful of 4chan users were ultimately behind #GamerGate, the supposedly grass-roots movement aimed at exposing ethical lapses in gaming journalism. The logs show a small group of users orchestrating a "hashtag campaign" to perpetuate misogynistic attacks by wrapping them in a debate about ethics in gaming journalism....""

+ - U.S. hastens offshore wind developments with new l->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The United States Department of the Interior aims to implement a more efficient and coordinated permitting process for offshore wind to accelerate the development of projects along the Atlantic coast.

The Smart from the Start initiative for the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf will facilitate siting, leasing and construction of new projects, which will help developers go through the permitting process without the burden of red tape, said interior secretary Ken Salazar."

Link to Original Source

+ - My GPL code has been... patented! 4

Submitted by ttsiod
ttsiod (881575) writes "Back in 2001, I coded HeapCheck, a GPL library for Windows (inspired by ElectricFence) that detected invalid read/write accesses on any heap allocations at runtime — thus greatly helping my debugging sessions. I published it on my site, and got a few users who were kind enough to thank me — a Serbian programmer even sent me 250$ as a thank you (I still have his mails). After a few years, Microsoft included very similar technology in the operating system itself, calling it PageHeap. I had more or less forgotten these stuff, since for the last 7 years I've been coding for UNIX/Linux, where valgrind superseeded Efence/dmalloc/etc. Imagine my surprise, when yesterday, Googling for references to my site, I found out that the technology I implemented, of runtime detection of invalid heap accesses, has been patented in the States, and to add insult to injury, even mentions my site (via a non-working link to an old version of my page) in the patent references! After the necessary "WTFs" and "bloody hells" I thought this merrits (a) a Slashdotting, and (b) a set of honest questions: what should I do about this? I am not an American citizen, but the "inventors" of this technology (see their names in the top of the patent) have apparently succeeded in passing this ludicrous patent in the States. If my code doesn't count as prior art, Bruce Perens's Efence (which I clearly state my code was inspired from) is at least 12 years prior! Suggestions/cursing patent trolls most welcome."

+ - UK law body targets RIAA style settlement letters->

Submitted by PerformanceDude
PerformanceDude (1798324) writes "The Register reports that a major UK law firm knew it sometimes had no reliable evidence of unlawful filesharing when it demanded hundreds of pounds damages from internet users, according to the solicitors' watchdog.

London-based Davenport Lyons threatened thousands of people with legal action for alleged copyright infringement between 2006 and 2009. They were told that by quickly paying around £500 damages, plus costs, they could avoid court.

Following complaints to the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA), Davenport Lyons now stands accused of deliberately ignoring concerns over the standard of its evidence."

Link to Original Source
Government

+ - Cybersecurity bill gives DHS power to punish tech ->

Submitted by suraj.sun
suraj.sun (1348507) writes "Cybersecurity bill gives DHS power to punish tech firms:

Democratic politicians are proposing a novel approach to cybersecurity: fine technology companies $100,000 a day unless they comply with directives imposed by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

Legislation introduced this week would allow DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano to levy those and other civil penalties on noncompliant companies that the government deems "critical," a broad term that could sweep in Web firms, broadband providers, and even software companies and search engines.

"This bill will make our nation more secure and better positions DHS--the 'focal point for the security of cyberspace'--to fulfill its critical homeland security mission," said Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.), the chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee.

CNET News: http://news.cnet.com/8301-13578_3-20023464-38.html"

Link to Original Source

Somebody ought to cross ball point pens with coat hangers so that the pens will multiply instead of disappear.

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