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Comment Higher salaries (Score 1) 137

Another idea for a weapons system - more pay for the top brass.

You could justify it in the same way that in many / most companies, senior management claims that higher pay and bonuses for directors motivates them to make more profit. Could you depend on a general who does not get at least, say, twenty times as much as the ordinary airman?

Comment Re:Makes me appreciate the English alphabet (Score 1) 315

I hope you also appreciate the huge effort that English speakers have to make to be able to become literate with those few characters. The 26 letters were designed for Latin. Almost all modern European languages have a more complex sound system, and English more so than most, coupled with a whole collection of contradictory spelling rules inherited from French, Latin, Greek, et.c.. The result is an effort put into literacy that is only comparable with Chinese and its ideograms. In fact, many English words are comparable to ideograms in having little relation to the letters that go into them.

Comment Re:You forgot to add... And to their DEATHS! (Score 1) 143

You miss the point; why should one country prescribe how foreigners name it, especially to this detail? It is natural for speakers of English and other western European languages to speak of 'the Ukraine', and the equivalent in German, et.c.. Since you say that 'Republic of the Sudan' is the official name of that country (I really don't know, and I wasn't referring to official names anyway), does then the Ukrainian government use an invented article when translating the 'Republic of the Sudan' into Ukrainian? How will the Filipino ambassador find his country described in Ukrainian government documents?

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Who knows more about the name of Ukraine, some random English speaker on the internet or the Ukrainians? - well, actually the random English speaker knows the name of the country in English as well as any random Ukrainian.

Comment Re:You forgot to add... And to their DEATHS! (Score 1) 143

You really need to become less sensitive about a western European naming convention which is not used in Ukrainian. When people say 'the Ukraine', they are not saying the country is now 'the borderlands of Russia' or the 'borderlands of the principality of Rus', or whatever it was originally. No one worries about the southeast Asian country being often referred to in English as 'the Philippines', or about the country south of Egypt being sometimes called 'the Sudan'. Numerous other non-country uses exist for various non English names across the world, including 'the Levant' (the east) of the Mediterranean coast, the Deccan (the south) of India, the Pampas (the plains) of Argentina, et.c.. It is just a recognition that the user knows the original meaning of the name, it is perfectly normal and correct in English.

Comment Are the hosts all in the US? (Score 1) 72

It's not clear who the actual hosts are, but I'm guessing from the report that they are Americans, of diverse origin. If the people 'of African descent' (for instance) are actually Americans of African descent, with the long contact with the majority European population, can we be sure they are not partly European? The caption for the map says '... distributed around the world'. I know it is a first investigation, but they apparently haven't investigated across the world.

Comment Re:The history of Musa is key (Score 1) 199

"Bananas were discovered by the Portuguese on the Atlantic coast of Africa. They cultivated the fruit on the Canary Islands. From there it was introduced to the Americas by Spanish missionaries. ...."

That is the recent, European and American history of the fruit, and what they 'discovered' in west Africa was that Africans were already cultivating it. Bananas had been discovered and used by others a whole long time before that. As can be seen in any wider treatment of the subject.

Comment Re:Doubt that I would be able (Score 1) 258

I'm sometimes in the same situation, and currently cannot get into an old PC despite knowing that it uses a variation of a current password, and there being a big clue present. If faced by the police and the law however, I suspect this will be seen as refusal to cooperate. In the same way that people have been tasered by the police for not being quiet and still.

Comment Re:So, the other side? (Score 1) 422

So? You think running a successful business takes some kind of extra special skill set? Higher levels of skill, talent, and perseverance than earning a PhD, and/or making a discovery, advancing science? More than it take to create and play a hit song or write a best selling book? But it seems more and more that the most important things successful businesspeople have are connections, and the skills and willingness to finesse the legal system to bribe the powerful and cheat the most vulnerable.

Lots of things are tough. Doing the right thing is one of the them.

Cancel undintended moderation.

Comment Re:Zero tolerance (mainly of birds) (Score 1) 227

Yes, this is what I suspect the result will be. That birds will be killed indiscrimately whenever and wherever the military / security situation deteriorates. Even in normal times I can see this happening over key locations, over tense borders, et.c.. Birds that keep to small territories will be less affected, those that migrate or have large ranges might be in increased danger of extinction.

Comment Re:How is this tech related? (Score 1) 156

Yes, I did read the summary. Then I also read the stories referenced there. You're implying that there was no lobbying by the US, while the articles clearly states that there was lobbying both from the US industry association and the US government, as well as from some European businesses. There is also mention of pressure from Canada and Brazil, but funnily enough it lists the US first.

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