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Submission + - Trump considering MIT grad for head Science position (thelibertyconservative.com)

SonicSpike writes: A confidential source on the Trump transition team has told The Liberty Conservative that Rep. Thomas Massie, an award-winning, MIT-educated engineer, elected to Congress in 2012, is under consideration for the job of Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, a role commonly known as Science Advisor to the President. Massie currently serves as Chairman for the Subcommittee on Technology and Innovation in the House of Representatives and is a libertarian-leaning Republican.

Submission + - Intel Selling Majority Stake In Intel Security, New Company To Be Called McAfee (fortune.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Intel is spinning out its security business with help from private equity firm TPG, as the chip giant focuses more on its top growth opportunities. Intel will collect $3.1 billion in cash and retain a 49% ownership stake. TPG will own 51% of the new company, to be called McAfee. Under terms of the spin off, TPG will make a $1.1 billion equity investment in McAfee, which will also take on $2 billion of debt. The deal is expected to close in the second quarter of 2017, Intel said. The deal ends Intel’s sometimes tumultuous efforts to add cybersecurity software features to its various semiconductor chip businesses. It also marks a near-final coda to Intel’s $8 billion purchase of McAfee in 2010. Analysts and investors have favored disposing of the business, which they said didn’t add much to the chip sales and was too dependent on the shrinking PC market. The unit reported $1.1 billion of revenue in the first half of the year, up 11% from the same period of 2015, and operating income of $182 million, a 391% jump. Chris Young, who joined Intel’s security unit from Cisco Systems in 2014, will be CEO of the new company. Intel said it still plans to collaborate with McAfee to add security features across its product lines.

Submission + - Modified USB Ethernet Adapter Can Steal Windows and Mac Credentials (softpedia.com)

An anonymous reader writes: An attacker can use a modified USB Ethernet adapter to fool Windows and Mac computers into giving away their login credentials. The attack relies on using a modified USB Ethernet adapter that runs special software which tricks the attacked computer in accepting the Ethernet adapter as the network gateway, DNS, and WPAD server.

The attack is possible because most computers will automatically install any plug-and-play (PnP) USB device. Even worse, when installing the new (rogue) USB Ethernet adapter, the computer will give out the local credentials needed to install the device. The custom software installed on the USB intercepts these credentials and logs them to an SQLite database. This attack can take around 13 seconds to carry out, and the USB Ethernet adapter can be equipped with an LED that tells the attacker when the login credentials have been stolen.

Submission + - SPAM: British town makes "mysoginy" a crime 1

mi writes: Nottinghamshire Police has officially recognized "misogyny" as a hate crime. Examples of the prohibited actions are:
  • unwanted or uninvited sexual advances
  • physical or verbal assault
  • unwanted or uninvited physical or verbal contact or engagement
  • use of mobile phones to send unwanted or uninvited messages
  • taking photographs without consent.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - French bill carries 5-year jail sentence for company refusals to decrypt data fo (dailydot.com)

Patrick O'Neill writes: Employees of companies in France that refuse to decrypt data for police can go to prison for five years under new legislation from conservative legislators. The punishment for refusing to hand over access to encrypted data is a five year jail sentence and $380,000 fine. Telecom companies would face their own penalties, including up to two years in jail. French politicians criticized American companies in particular: "They deliberately use the argument of public freedoms to make money knowing full well that the encryption used to drug traffickers, to serious [criminals] and especially to terrorists. It is unacceptable that the state loses any control over encryption and, in fact, be the subject of manipulation by U.S. multinationals.”

Submission + - Carnegie Mellon attacked Tor; subpoenaed by Feds (vice.com)

Alypius writes: CMU's Software Engineering Institute (SEI) was under DOD contract to deanonymize dark web sites when it was served a subpoena to provide IP addresses to the FBI. The judge involved has ruled that, “SEI's identification of the defendant's IP address because of his use of the Tor network did not constitute a search subject to Fourth Amendment scrutiny.”

Submission + - Senators blast Comcast, other cable firms for "unfair billing practices" (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Six Democratic US senators today criticized Comcast and other TV and broadband providers for charging erroneous fees, such as cable modem rental fees billed to customers who bought their own modems. The senators have written a letter to Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler asking the commission to "stop unfair billing practices.".....Last year, more than 30 percent of complaints to the FCC about Internet service and 38 percent of complaints about TV service were about billing...

Submission + - Smartwatches Can Be Used to Spy on Your Card's PIN Code (softpedia.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A researcher has developed a smartwatch app that can interpret hand motions and translate the movements to specific keystrokes on 12-keys keypads, as the ones used for ATM PIN cards. The app sends the data to a nearby smartphone, which then relays it to a server, for analysis. The whole AI algorithm on which it's built has a 73% accuracy for touchlogging events, and 59% for keylogging. The entire code is on GitHub, along with his research paper, and a YouTube video.

Submission + - Microsoft's Modernized Development Workflow Begins To Show Cracks (petri.com)

An anonymous reader writes: As widely reported last year from various sources, most of Microsoft's QA staff in the Windows division was eliminated in their 2014 layoffs. According to an article at Petri, the effects are now starting to be felt and the results aren't nearly as positive as those reported by Yahoo's similar experiment:

"According to several people familiar with the new process who asked not to be named, the new workflow caused issues for developers as they were not quite sure how to balance time devoted to testing versus building. Further, having spent years coding and not performing detailed and prolonged testing, their methods for quality control were not to the same standards as those who were dedicated to the task. Under the new process, the time allotted to building out new features includes testing the code as well, which it previously did not, which means that those engineers who are accustomed to the old style, now find themselves under more pressure to turn out quality code in a shorter period since they have to do the detailed testing. The end result, as we have seen with Windows 10, is a product with more bugs and it's starting to show the weakness of the new process flow."

Apropos of nothing, ZDNet reports that the latest Windows Phone 10 release has been pulled because of bugs in the installation process and also reports on Microsoft's official apology for the numerous issues that have plagued it's recent Surface Pro 4 and Surface Book devices.

Submission + - Ashley Madison's passwords cracked, soon to be released (arstechnica.com)

JustAnotherOldGuy writes: Uh-oh. Until now there was good reason to believe the 36 million Ashley Madison user passwords published last month would never be cracked. Website developers protected them with bcrypt, a hash function so slow and computationally demanding it would require years or decades of around-the-clock processing with super-expensive computers to decipher even a small percentage of them. That assurance was shattered with the discovery of the programming error disclosed by a group calling itself CynoSure Prime. Members have already exploited the weakness to crack more than 11 million Ashley Madison user passwords, and they hope to tackle another four million in the next week or two.

Submission + - Cameron tells pornography websites to block access by children or face closure (theguardian.com)

An anonymous reader writes: David Cameron is to give pornography websites one last chance to produce an effective voluntary scheme for age-restricted controls on their sites or he will introduce legislation that could see them shut down.

At the election the then culture secretary, Sajid Javid, said the party would act to ensure under-18s were locked out of adult content and the Conservative election Facebook page in April promised legislation to achieve this.

It followed a Childline poll that found nearly one in 10 12-13-year-olds were worried they were addicted to pornography and 18% had seen shocking or upsetting images.

In a consultation to be launched in the autumn, the government will seek views on how best to introduce measures to further restrict under-18s’ access to pornographic websites.

Submission + - Amazon Announces New Car Show Featuring the Old Top Gear Presenters (gizmodo.com)

mknewman writes: Amazon has announced that Jeremy Clarkson, Richard Hammond and James May will be reuniting to create “an all-new car show” that will be exclusively on Amazon Prime.

The new show will be produced by the old-time Top Gear executive producer Andy Wilman and is scheduled to go into production “shortly.” It will apparently appear on screens in 2016. For what it’s worth, Jeremy Clarkson has said that the move makes him “feel like I’ve climbed out of a bi-plane and into a spaceship.”

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Advertising Companies Accused of Deliberately Slowing Page-load Times For Profit 394

An anonymous reader writes: An industry insider has told Business Insider of his conviction that ad-serving companies deliberately prolong the 'auctioning' process for ad spots when a web-page loads. They do this to maximize revenue by allowing automated 'late-comers' to participate beyond the 100ms limit placed on the decision-making process. The unnamed source, a principal engineer at a global news company (whose identity and credentials were confirmed by Business Insider), concluded with the comment: "My entire team of devs and testers mostly used Adblock when developing sites, just because it was so painful otherwise." Publishers use 'daisy-chaining' to solicit bids from the most profitable placement providers down to the 'B-list' placements, and the longer the process is run, the more likely that the web-page will be shown with profitable advertising in place.

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