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Security

Submission + - NYPD to Identify 'Deranged' Gunmen through Internet Chatter

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "Michael Wilson writes in the NY Times that top intelligence officials in the New York Police Department are looking for ways to target “apolitical or deranged killers before they become active shooters" using techniques similar to those being used to spot terrorists’ chatter online. The techniques would include "cyber-searches of language that mass-casualty shooters have used in e-mails and Internet postings,” says Police Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly. “The goal would be to identify the shooter in cyberspace, engage him there and intervene, possibly using an undercover to get close, and take him into custody or otherwise disrupt his plans.” There are also plans to send officers to Newtown and to scenes of other mass shootings to collect information says the department’s chief spokesman Paul. J. Browne adding that potential tactics include creating an algorithm that would search online “for terms used by active shooters in the past that may be an indicator of future intentions.” The NYPD’s counter-terrorism division released a report last year, "Active Shooter," after studying 202 mass shooting incidents (PDF). “So, we think this is another logical step,” says Kelly."
Crime

Law Enforcement Wants To Try 'Predictive Policing' 377

Harperdog with this excerpt from a story about using statistics to fight crime: "It’s great when cops catch criminals after they've done their dirty work. But what if police could stop a crime before it was even committed? Though that may sound like a fantasy straight from a Philip K. Dick novel, it's a goal police departments from Los Angeles to Memphis are actively pursuing with help from the Department of Justice and a handful of cutting-edge academics. It's called 'predictive policing.' The idea: Although no one can foresee individual crimes, it is possible to forecast patterns of where and when homes are likely to be burgled or cars stolen by analyzing truckloads of past crime reports and other data with sophisticated computer algorithms. 'We know where crime has occurred in the last month, but that doesn't mean it'll be there next month,' Los Angeles Police Department Lt. Sean Malinowski says. 'The only way for us to continue to have crime reduction is to start anticipating where crime is going to occur.'"

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