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Mars

4-Billion-Pixel Panorama View From Curiosity Rover 101

SternisheFan points out that there is a great new panorama made from shots from the Curiosity Rover. "Sweep your gaze around Gale Crater on Mars, where NASA's Curiosity rover is currently exploring, with this 4-billion-pixel panorama stitched together from 295 images. ...The entire image stretches 90,000 by 45,000 pixels and uses pictures taken by the rover's two MastCams. The best way to enjoy it is to go into fullscreen mode and slowly soak up the scenery — from the distant high edges of the crater to the enormous and looming Mount Sharp, the rover's eventual destination."
Networking

Misconfigured Open DNS Resolvers Key To Massive DDoS Attacks 179

msm1267 writes with an excerpt From Threat Post: "While the big traffic numbers and the spat between Spamhaus and illicit webhost Cyberbunker are grabbing big headlines, the underlying and percolating issue at play here has to do with the open DNS resolvers being used to DDoS the spam-fighters from Switzerland. Open resolvers do not authenticate a packet-sender's IP address before a DNS reply is sent back. Therefore, an attacker that is able to spoof a victim's IP address can have a DNS request bombard the victim with a 100-to-1 ratio of traffic coming back to them versus what was requested. DNS amplification attacks such as these have been used lately by hacktivists, extortionists and blacklisted webhosts to great success." Running an open DNS resolver isn't itself always a problem, but it looks like people are enabling neither source address verification nor rate limiting.
Google

Google Pledges Not To Sue Any Open Source Projects Using Their Patents 153

sfcrazy writes "Google has announced the Open Patent Non-Assertion (OPN) Pledge. In the pledge Google says that they will not sue any user, distributor, or developer of Open Source software on specified patents, unless first attacked. Under this pledge, Google is starting off with 10 patents relating to MapReduce, a computing model for processing large data sets first developed at Google. Google says that over time they intend to expand the set of Google's patents covered by the pledge to other technologies." This is in addition to the Open Invention Network, and their general work toward reforming the patent system. The patents covered in the OPN will be free to use in Free/Open Source software for the life of the patent, even if Google should transfer ownership to another party. Read the text of the pledge. It appears that interaction with non-copyleft licenses (MIT/BSD/Apache) is a bit weird: if you create a non-free fork it appears you are no longer covered under the pledge.
Idle

Submission + - Stewart & Colbert plan competing D.C. rallies (theglobeandmail.com)

Lev13than writes: In a direct retort to Glenn Beck's Restoring Honor rally, John Stewart and Stephen Colbert have announced competing rallies on October 30th. Stewart plans to host a “Rally To Restore Sanity” on Oct. 30 on the National Mall in D.C. for the Americans he says are too busy living normal, rational lives to attend other political demonstrations. Colbert, meantime, will shepherd his fans in a “March To Keep Fear Alive.” “Damn your reasonableness!” Colbert said. “Now is not the time to take it down a notch. Now is the time for all good men to freak out for freedom!” Stewart, meanwhile, has promised to provide attendees with signs featuring slogans such as “I Disagree With You But I'm Pretty Sure You're Not Hitler” and “I'm Afraid of Spiders.”
Microsoft

Submission + - The Return of "Best Viewed With Internet Explorer" (technologizer.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: As part of its launch of the Internet Explorer 9 beta, Microsoft partnered with dozens of companies--from USA Today to BMW--to build sites that show off IE9's support for HTML5 and hardware acceleration. Some of them work extremely poorly in other browsers, and carry messages telling users to download IE9 for the best experience. Let's hope this isn't a return to the bad old days of the 1990s,when it was common for companies to slap "Best Viewed in Internet Explorer" logos on their sites and not even try to work equally well in every browser.
Technology

Submission + - Boeing: $89M for drone that can fly for 5 years (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: One of the more unique unmanned aircraft took a giant step toward reality this week when the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) inked an agreement with Boeing to build the SolarEagle, a plane capable of remaining at heights over 60,000ft for over five years. Boeing says the first SolarEagle under the $89 million contract could fly as early as 2014.

Submission + - Roger Ebert Approves 3D (suntimes.com)

uncleO writes: Film and Ebert fans have known for a while of Rogert Ebert's aversion to 3D films. One example: "Man, I've been saying this since Day One. 3D is the waste of a perfectly good dimension...3D delivers an inferior picture, noticeably dimmer, not to mention occasional headaches, nausea and dizziness." But in a blog post today about Werner Herzog's latest film, "Cave of Forgotten Dreams", Ebert praises Herzog for "[using] 3D as a way for us to enter the film's space, instead of a way for it to enter ours," and says Herzog "was correct to realize how useful it would be in photographing these [Chauvet Cave] walls."
Operating Systems

How Kernel Hackers Boosted the Speed of Desktop Linux 380

chromatic writes "Kernel hackers Arjan van de Ven and Auke Kok showed off Linux booting in five seconds at last month's Linux Plumbers Conference. Arjan and other hackers have already improved the Linux user experience by reducing power consumption and latency. O'Reilly News interviewed him about his work on improving the Linux experience with PowerTOP, LatencyTOP, and Five-Second Boot."
Media (Apple)

Looming Royalty Decision Threatens iTunes Store, Apple Hints 279

eldavojohn writes "You may recall us discussing some legislation about online music. More decisions are being made that may affect how much money Apple must impart to labels and musicians. Right now, it's 9 cents a track — which adds up, when you sell 2.4 billion tracks each year. The Copyright Royalty Board is asking for 15 cents a track (66% increase) and Apple isn't going to agree." Reader scorp1us points out a similar article at CNN; both stories mention that Apple has intimated such a change might cause a complete shutdown of the iTunes Music Store. Update: 10/02 21:03 GMT by T : According to CNet, the rate has been officially frozen at 9.1 cents per track.

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