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Submission + - Wozniak Gets Personal On Innovation

snydeq writes: Companies are doggedly pursuing the next big thing in technology, but nothing seems to be pointing to the right way these days, claims the legendary Steve Wozniak. The reason? 'You tend to deal with the past,' replicating what you know in a new form. Consider the notion of computing eyeware like Google Glass: 'People have been marrying eyewear with TV inputs for 20 years,' Wozniak says. True innovation, Wozniak claims, becomes more human, more personal. People use technology more the less it feels like technology. 'The software gets more accepted when it works in human ways — meaning in noncomputer ways.' Here, Wozniak says, is the key to technology's role in the education system.
Security

Submission + - Siemens Nokia helped provide Iran's censoring tech

An anonymous reader writes: The Wall Street Journal has an article about Nokia and Siemens selling the censoring technology to Iran's government (WSJ article ). Do you believe that the public relation damage to these companies can persuade them from selling this kind of technology to other dictatorial regimes?
Media

Submission + - British court rules against whistleblower bloggers (timesonline.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: In a dangerous judgment for British bloggers and whistleblowers, a British court has ruled absurdly that simply because blogging itself is a public activity, bloggers have "no reasonable expectation of privacy" regarding their identities, and newspapers are allowed to publish their identities if they can find them by fair or foul means. A British police detective who recently won the Orwell Prize for his excellent political writing used his blog to write highly critical accounts of police activities and unethical behavior, making very powerful enemies in the process. A well-funded newspaper with powerful connections quickly heard of his blog and decided it was absolutely vital to expose his identity using an investigative journalist. Like any good newspaper, the blogger anonymized the people and the locations in all the cases he discussed on his blog, but the newspaper alleges these were not sufficiently anonymized and complains that they could work out the identities, though British newspapers don't complain that they are allowed to publish the identities of men who are falsely accused of rape and cleared in court. The newspaper also helpfully contacted the blogger's employer, and his job is now threatened.

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