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Submission + - The race for autonomous cars is over. Silicon Valley lost. (autoblog.com)

schwit1 writes: Up until very recently the talk in Silicon Valley was about how the tech industry was going to broom Detroit into the dustbin of history. Companies such as Apple, Google, and Uber — so the thinking went -were going to out run, out gun, and out innovate the automakers. Today that talk is starting to fade. There's a dawning realization that maybe there's a good reason why the traditional car companies have been around for more than a century.

Last year Apple laid off most of the engineers it hired to design its own car. Google (now Waymo) stopped talking about making its own car. And Uber, despite its sky high market valuation, is still a long, long way from ever making any money, much less making its own autonomous cars.

To paraphrase Elon Musk, Silicon Valley is learning that "Making rockets is hard, but making cars is really hard." People outside of the auto industry tend to have a shallow understanding of how complex the business really is. They think all you have to do is design a car and start making it. But most startups never make it past the concept car stage because the move to mass production proves too daunting.

Comment Ahem.... (Score 5, Insightful) 660

> "You can't take an 18-month training program and produce a machine-learning scientist."

That's fine - if you're looking for machine-learning scientists.

Unfortunately, the majority of the recipients of these H1B's are low paid scab labor, imported to cut labor costs.

Raising the cost of H1B's should take care of that loophole while still allowing GoDaddy to import their "machine-learning scientists".

Submission + - Carrie Fisher passes away (people.com) 1

wiggles writes: “It is with a very deep sadness that Billie Lourd confirms that her beloved mother Carrie Fisher passed away at 8:55 this morning,”

Comment Re:Why has it taken [all] this long? (Score 1) 140

ftfa:

We cannot comment on specific patents, not now, not ever. Red Hat has determined that it is now acceptable for Fedora to include MP3 decoding functionality (not specific to any implementation, or binding by any unseen agreement). Encoding functionality is not permitted at this time.

It appears Red Hat has entered into some sort of double secret licensing agreement with Fraunhofer that they can't disclose the details on.

Comment Re:Raises one question.... (Score 4, Informative) 106

When I was there, it was definitely not easy to circumvent. I tried multiple VPNs, dns tricks, all kinds of things, but my internet coverage was spotty at best. If I tried to go to any western news site for any reason, I'd find my phone either throttled to nothing or completely offline for hours or days.

They seemed to be cracking down on VPN usage via deep packet inspection and/or whack-a-mole with overseas endpoints.

I was there in November of 2014, so I can't imagine things have gotten much better.

Comment Re:Caps have been in place... (Score 5, Informative) 173

They charged me an extra ~$100 one month and ~$50 another. Just charged my card and left me wondering wtf happened until I called them.

Never ever EVER give a company your credit card number for automated billing. NEVER EVER EVER give them your bank account information for automated billing.

You asked for this problem when you signed up.

Comment Re:Suzie can vote. Suzie can get a pitchfork. (Score 5, Insightful) 954

And no other jobs come to fill their places?

By your logic, we'd be at 75% unemployment (figure pulled out of my ass, admittedly, but just making a point here...) right now with all the technological advances since the 1970s. What do you think happened to our economy to achieve our current 5% unemployment rate? Are all those file clerks and bookkeepers still out of work or did they find something else to do?

People made the same arguments you're making for every technological leap forward. The net result has always been people thrown out of low wage, miserable jobs have found higher wage, less miserable jobs, given enough time.

It's called Structural Unemployment. It is a problem for workers who are too old to retrain - think people in their upper 50's trying to sprint to retirement - but for the vast majority of the workforce, it's a net benefit in the long run at the cost of a little short term pain.

Comment Re:Suzie can vote. Suzie can get a pitchfork. (Score 5, Insightful) 954

This entire thread is based on a false idea that if people are thrown out of minimum wage jobs that they'll be unemployed forever.

This has been proven countless times since the 1700's to be absolutely false.

Once a technological innovation disrupts employment - the loom, the cotton gin, the computer, the combine planter/harvester, the robot - those who were displaced from employment find new jobs in higher paying sectors, at least in the aggregate. How many file clerks do you know? Know anybody picking corn, wheat, or soybeans by hand? Yet unemployment is around 5%.

The people slinging burgers will find new work. They'll have to. New employment opportunities will open up; they always have.

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