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Australia

World's Largest Dinosaur Footprints Discovered In Western Australia (theguardian.com) 10

An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: The largest known dinosaur footprints have been discovered in Western Australia, including 1.7 meter prints left by gigantic herbivores. Until now, the biggest known dinosaur footprint was a 106cm track discovered in the Mongolian desert and reported last year. At the new site, along the Kimberley shoreline in a remote region of Western Australia, paleontologists discovered a rich collection of dinosaur footprints in the sandstone rock, many of which are only visible at low tide. The prints, belonging to about 21 different types of dinosaur, are also thought to be the most diverse collection of prints in the world. Steve Salisbury, a vertebrate paleontologist at the University of Queensland told ABC News: "We've got several tracks up in that area that are about 1.7 meters long. So most people would be able to fit inside tracks that big, and they indicate animals that are probably around 5.3 to 5.5 meters at the hip, which is enormous." "It is extremely significant, forming the primary record of non-avian dinosaurs in the western half the continent and providing the only glimpse of Australia's dinosaur fauna during the first half of the early Cretaceous period," he said. The findings were reported in the Memoir of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology. The largest tracks belonged to sauropods, huge Diplodocus-like herbivores with long necks and tails. The scientists also discovered tracks from about four different types of ornithopod dinosaurs (two-legged herbivores) and six types of armored dinosaurs, including Stegosaurs, which had not previously been seen in Australia. At the time the prints were left, 130m years ago, the area was a large river delta and dinosaurs would have traversed wet sandy areas between surrounding forests.

Comment Re:"While this is a victory for common sense" (Score 1) 297

Speaking as such a person, if we can handle singular-plural "you", we can certainly handle "they". It would hardly be the most fucked up part of English, anyway. Learning English by trying to apply common sense to it is a recipe in frustration; you might as well just give up from the get go, and embrace the madness. It will make its own perverse sense eventually, but I'm loathe to call that kind of sense "common".

Comment Re:Very poor example. (Score 1) 297

Spanish is the only language that I know of that has a fairly elegant solution: you can omit the pronoun and it is inferred from the conjugation and declination. So if you don't know the gender you can just omit the pronouns entirely ("Dijo que no sabia" translates as "He or she said that he or she didn't know").

Ironically, in Russian you can also omit the pronoun, but the catch is that gender is also reflected in adjectives and verbs. It's so pervasive in the language that it's practically impossible to construct a sequence in a way that would not imply it one way or the other.

Comment Re:How (Score 1) 297

You're talking about different things - grammar versus usage.

What's commonly referred to as "singular they" is grammatically plural - "they are ..." etc. It is singular in a sense that it refers to a single person.

In a similar vein, while "you" is always grammatically plural in English, "singular you" is used to describe the case where "you" refers to a single person.

Comment Re:How (Score 1) 297

Because in many cases you don't actually know their gender.

"After the user opened the dialog, he sees ..."

That was the typical way to write that sentence. It also implies gender where it's neither warranted nor desirable.

"After the user opened the dialog, they see ..."

Businesses

Bay Area Tech Executives Indicted For H-1B Visa Fraud (mercurynews.com) 112

New submitter s.petry quotes a report from The Mercury News: Two Bay Area tech executives are accused of filing false visa documents through a staffing agency in a scheme to illegally bring a pool of foreign tech workers into the United States. An indictment from a federal grand jury unsealed on Friday accuses Jayavel Murugan, Dynasoft Synergy's chief executive officer, and a 40-year-old Santa Clara man, Syed Nawaz, of fraudulently submitting H-1B applications in an effort to illegally obtain visas, according to Brian Stretch, U.S. attorney for the Northern District of California. The men are charged with 26 counts of visa fraud, conspiracy to commit visa fraud, use of false documents, mail fraud and aggravated identity theft, according to prosecutors. Each charge can carry penalties of between two and 20 years in prison. Prosecutors say the men used fraudulent documents to bring workers into the U.S. and create a pool of H-1B workers to hire out to tech companies. The indictment charges that from 2010 to 2016, Dynasoft petitioned to place workers at Stanford University, Cisco and Brocade, but the employers had no intention of receiving the foreign workers named on the applications. Nawaz submitted fake "end-client letters" to the government, falsely claiming the workers were on-site and performing jobs, according to the indictment.

Slashdot reader s.petry adds: "While not the only problem with the H-1B Visa program, this is a start at investigating and hopefully correcting problems."

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