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The Internet

Submission + - Will feds mandate Internet routing security? (networkworld.com)

alphadogg writes: The Department of Homeland Security has spent $3 million over the past few years on research aimed at bolstering the security of the Internet's routing system.

Now, as this research is being deployed across the Internet, DHS wants government agencies and their carriers to be among the earliest adopters of the new Resource Public Key Infrastructure (RPKI) system that it helped create.

DHS considers the RPKI system to be a much-needed first step in securing the Internet's core routing protocol, which is called the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP). In addition to its support of RPKI, DHS also has spent around $1 million on research and software development aimed at adding security directly to BGP.

RPKI helps improve routing security by adding a layer of encryption to the communications between Internet registries and network operators. With RPKI, network operators can verify that they have the authority to route traffic for a block of IP addresses or routing prefixes known as Autonomous System Numbers.

RPKI is designed to prevent Internet routing attacks http://www.networkworld.com/news/2009/011509-bgp-attacks.html and accidents, such as the recent China Telecom Internet traffic hijacking incident http://www.networkworld.com/news/2010/111810-china-telecom-operator-denies-hijacking.htmlthat has received attention on Capitol Hill.

Facebook

Submission + - Facebook buys (most of) drop.io (idg.com.au)

angry tapir writes: "Facebook has purchased most of drop.io, an online content-sharing service, but the social-networking giant sounds more interested in acquiring the company's developers than its technology. Drop.io is a service that lets users create a "drop" where they can share documents, videos and other digital content. The user can set a time for how long the drop will exist, decide who can view the content, set permissions for who can alter the content and share content in a variety of ways, including on Facebook."
Transportation

Submission + - Are cars the next hacking frontier? (thecarconnection.com)

thecarchik writes: Is it time for firewalls and malware protection for your car? Earlier this year we reported on research from the University of Washington and the University of California, San Diego, that showed how researchers were able to break into vehicle networks or change features—in some cases, while the vehicle was in motion. In the United States, the federally-mandated On-Board Diagnostics port, under the dash in virtually all modern vehicles, provides direct and standard access to internal automotive networks . Safety-critical systems (such as stability control or engine control) actually haven't been isolated from non-safety-critical systems (such as entertainment systems).
Patents

Submission + - Is the Tide Turning on Patents? (computerworlduk.com)

Glyn Moody writes: The FSF has funded a new video, “Patent Absurdity: how software patents broke the system”, freely available (of course) in Ogg Theora format (what else?). It comes at time when a lot is happening in the world of patents. Recent work from leading academics has called into question their basis: "The work in this paper and that of many others, suggests that this traditionally-struck ‘devil’s bargain’ may not be beneficial." A judge struck down Myriad Genetics's patents on two genes because they involved a law of Nature, and were thus “improperly granted”. Meanwhile, the imminent Supreme Court ruling In re Bilski is widely expected to have negative knock-on effects for business method and software patents. Is the tide beginning to turn?
Privacy

Submission + - E-mail Not Protected by 4th Amendment (volokh.com) 3

DustyShadow writes: In the case In re United States, Judge Mosman ruled that there is no constitutional requirement of notice to the account holder because the Fourth Amendment does not apply to e-mails under the third-party doctrine. "When a person uses the Internet, the user’s actions are no longer in his or her physical home; in fact he or she is not truly acting in private space at all. The user is generally accessing the Internet with a network account and computer storage owned by an ISP like Comcast or NetZero. All materials stored online, whether they are e-mails or remotely stored documents, are physically stored on servers owned by an ISP. When we send an e-mail or instant message from the comfort of our own homes to a friend across town the message travels from our computer to computers owned by a third party, the ISP, before being delivered to the intended recipient. Thus, “private” information is actually being held by third-party private companies."
Security

Submission + - Modern Hydra - the new tricks of spammers and phis (heise-security.co.uk)

juct writes: "To shut down a botnet used to be easy: find the central Command&Control server and close it down. Fast Flux networks any more. heise Security describes how bot masters start to implement a new flexible layer of proxy intermediaries. These are numerous, and several replacements are available in the background should one of them be shut down — catch one, and two new ones will appear."

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