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Submission + - AdSurfDaily Ponzi Scheme Payback Begins (itworld.com)

itwbennett writes: "Good news if you were one of the 8,400 people taken in by the AdSurfDaily Ponzi scheme: The DOJ and Secret Service have begun to return $55 million in forfeited funds. AdSurfDaily founder Thomas "Andy" Bowdoin Jr. is facing five counts of wire fraud, one count of securities fraud, and one count of unlawful sale of unregistered securities."
Space

Submission + - Does Famous Exoplanet 'Fomalhaut b' Really Exist? (discovery.com)

astroengine writes: "The first exoplanet ever to be directly imaged by the Hubble space telescope may not exist. In 2008, the world was in awe of the famous "Eye of Sauron" image of the star Fomalhaut's dusty ring — plus a slowly moving object that was identified as Fomalhaut b, a gas giant world approximately 3-times the mass of Jupiter. However, due to a strange orbital misstep detected between 2008 and 2009 photographs, the validity of Fomalhaut b's detection is being questioned, generating some controversy in the exoplanet community."

Submission + - Santorum Still Doesn't Understand "Google Bombs" (rollcall.com)

PerlDiver writes: The former U.S. Senator (R-PA) who got famously, um, smeared by sex columnist Dan Savage after saying that gay sex could "undermine the fabric of our society" apparently still hasn't been told that it takes thousands of links on many sites to affect Google search results rankings:

Santorum himself sounded slightly defeated when asked about it recently.

"It's one guy. You know who it is. The Internet allows for this type of vulgarity to circulate. It's unfortunate that we have someone who obviously has some issues. But he has an opportunity to speak," Santorum told Roll Call.

Or maybe the alleged 2012 Presidential hopeful just can't imagine he's that unpopular.

Games

Submission + - University of Notre Dame Develops Wiihabilitation (nd.edu)

An anonymous reader writes: The University of Notre Dame Computer Science Department, led by Dr. Aaron Striegel, is developing a Wiihabilitation program, utilizing the Wii Balance Board and other peripheral devices to enhance stroke and amputee rehabilitation. The Summer 2010 REU program at the University participated in this project, and it is still ongoing.
Government

Submission + - D.C. suspends tests of online voting system

Fortran IV writes: Back in June, Washington, D.C. signed up with the The Open Source Digital Foundation to set up an internet voting system for D.C. residents overseas. The plan was to have the system operational by the November general election. Last week the D.C. Board of Elections and Ethics opened the system for testing and attracted the attention of students at the University of Michigan, with comical results. The D.C. Board has postponed implementation of the system for "more robust testing."
United States

Submission + - Judge: Tenenbaum guilty of copyright infringement (arstechnica.com)

suraj.sun writes: In a reversal of her decision Thursday night, Judge Nancy Gertner has issued a directed verdict against P2P defendant Joel Tenenbaum, ruling that he is liable for infringing the record labels' copyrights on all 30 of the songs in question. It will be up to the jury to determine whether the infringement was willful and the size of the award--which could be as high as $4.5 million.

Judge Gertner's change of heart came after she had a chance to review the transcript of Thursday's testimony by Joel Tenenbaum. During direct examination, Tenenbaum was asked a simple question by the labels' counsel: "on the stand now, are you admitting liability for downloading and distributing all 30 sound recordings that are at issue and listed on Exhibits 55 and 56 of the exhibits?" His simple "yes" answer was enough to hand the labels a victory on the question of liability.

ARSTechnica : http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2009/07/judge-tenenbaum-guilty-of-copyright-infringement.ars

Censorship

Submission + - Renter Sued By Landlord For Complaining On Twitter (brainhandles.com) 1

gbulmash writes: "When Amanda Bonnen posted an angry tweet about her moldy apartment, she probably thought she was blowing off steam. But the Sun Times News Group reports her Twitter feed was public, her tweet was indexed, her landlord found it, and they claim it has so damaged their reputation they're suing her for $50,000+ in damages. Looks like another sue-happy company is going to discover the Streisand Effect."
Moon

Submission + - Apollo Landing Sites Pose Threat to LRO Instrument (spacefellowship.com) 1

Matt_dk writes: "The recent images released by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter of the Apollo landing sites are truly remarkable. But there is one instrument on board LRO that must avoid studying some of the the Apollo sites as well as other places where humans have placed spacecraft on the the lunar surface. The Lunar Orbiting Laser Altimeter (LOLA) pulses a single laser beam down to the surface to create a high-resolution global topographic map of the Moon. However, LOLA is turned off when it passes over the Apollo sites because bouncing the laser off any of the retro-reflective mirrors on experiments left by the astronauts might damage the instrument."
United States

Submission + - People On Terror Watch List Still Able To Buy Guns (cnn.com)

s31523 writes: "The GAO has provided a report, at the request of Sen. Frank Lautenberg(D-New Jersey), on gun sales to people that have somehow made it on to the US terrorist watch list. The report shows that from February 2004 to February 2009 there were 963 positive matches to the list. Of the 963, 865 were allowed to proceed, and 98 were denied, the report said. According to a statement made by Lautenberg, he is introducing legislation that would give the U.S. attorney general authority to stop the sale of guns or explosives to terrorists. The NRA has balked at this stating "The integrity of the terror watch list is poor, as it mistakenly contains the names of many men and women, including some high-profile Americans, who have not violated the law". Is this just a slick way for the government to get around the 2nd Amendment and simply add people to the terror watch list at will to prevent gun sales?"
Social Networks

Submission + - Montana City Requires Workers' Internet Accounts (montanasnewsstation.com)

justinlindh writes: Bozeman Montana is now requiring all applicants for city jobs to furnish Internet account information for "background checking". A portion of the application reads, "Please list any and all, current personal or business websites, web pages or memberships on any Internet-based chat rooms, social clubs or forums, to include, but not limited to: Facebook, Google, Yahoo, YouTube.com, MySpace, etc.". The article goes on to mention, "There are then three lines where applicants can list the Web sites, their user names and log-in information and their passwords." This seems a pretty blatant violation of privacy, to me.
The Courts

Submission + - Thomas Testimony and the RIAA Near Fatal Error (arstechnica.com)

eldavojohn writes: "The long and torrid trial of Jammie Thomas is in its second stage and in full swing. Yesterday two major things happened according to Ars where Thomas gave her surprising testimony and the RIAA was threatened with not disclosing new information to the opposing counsel. Thomas claimed she didn't know what KaZaA was before the trial started. She also claimed the hard drive handed over to the investigators was a different one than the one that was in her computer. This is very problematic testimony considering her testimony from the first trial. The RIAA escaped barely and almost lost all evidence from a particular witness when they added an additional log file to the evidence without the defense being notified of it. The judge mercifully only removed that new evidence from the trial. That evidence being related to whether or not an external hard drive was ever connected to the computer."

Feed Science Daily: Self-injury Found To Be Common In High School Students (sciencedaily.com)

Non-Suicidal Self-Injury -- the deliberate, direct destruction of body tissue without conscious suicidal intent -- is a relatively common occurrence for adolescents in high school, a new study suggests. Led by researchers at The Miriam Hospital and The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, nearly half of the teens studied endorsed some form of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI) in the past year, most frequently biting self, cutting/carving skin, hitting self on purpose, and burning skin.

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