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Submission + - Chinese Scammers Take Mattel To the Bank, Phishing Them for $3 Million

itwbennett writes: Mattel, the popular toy maker behind Barbie and Hot Wheels, was the victim of a Phishing attack last year that nearly cost them $3 million. On April 30, 2015 a Mattel finance executive got a note from the new CEO, Christopher Sinclair, requesting a new vendor payment to China. Transfers required approval from two high-ranking managers; the finance exec qualified and so did the CEO. The transfer was made. The only thing preventing a total loss was the fact that the following day was a bank holiday. Details of the attack against Mattel come from a report by the Associated Press, investigating money laundering and other financial crime in Wenzhou, China.

Submission + - At BUILD 2016, Microsoft intentionally ignore the Windows Phone platform (windows10update.com)

Ammalgam writes: Something remarkable happened today in San Francisco. Microsoft kicked off its Build developer conference and focused on Windows 10, Windows ink, Sticky Notes, Conversational semantics, bots, and developer tools.

They never mentioned a supposedly important part of their ecosystem — Windows Phone.

It gets worse.

When asked about the absence of Windows Phone from the day's proceedings, Windows chief Terry Myerson responded.

“If you wanted to reach a lot of phone customers, Windows Phone isn’t the way to do it,” admitted Myerson. “If you want to reach a lot of Windows customers, then this is the largest install base of 9 to 30-inch screens. If you wanted to do new and exciting things, then the Xbox and HoloLens is the place to have a discussion.”

Seems like Microsoft are raising the white flag on Windows Phone. Do you agree?

Submission + - Getting Started with GNU Radio (hackaday.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Software Defined Radio must be hard to create, right? Tools like GNU Radio and GNU Radio Companion make it much easier to build radios that can tune AM, FM, and even many digital modes. Of course, you need some kind of radio hardware, right? Not exactly. Hackaday has one of their video hands on tutorials about how to use GNU Radio with no extra hardware (or, optionally, a sound card that you probably already have). The catch? Well, you can't do real radio that way, but you can learn the basics and do audio DSP. The next installment promises to use some real SDR hardware and build an actual radio. But if you ever wanted to see if it was worth buying SDR hardware, this is a good way to see how you like working with GNU Radio before you spend any money.
Digital

Submission + - The history of the digital camera

An anonymous reader writes: CNet is running an interesting article about the history of the digital camera, "From theoretical beginnings as a space-travel navigation aid, the digital camera has developed from roots in tapeless analogue cameras, through sky-charting behemoths and consumer concepts. We've charted the milestones, the innovators, the groundbreakers and the downright strange. Take a look to see where your camera came from, as we visit Grandad Kodak, Uncle Apple and a whole family tree of camera cousins".

Feed Engadget: Wii not getting a hard drive because "it's like an iPod" (engadget.com)

Filed under: Gaming

Although the Wii's Virtual Console channel has been a smashing success, there's always a price for fame: quite a few gamers are running up against the storage roadblocks of Nintendo's console and starting to wonder about expansion options beyond SD cards -- like, say, a hard drive. Sadly, however, Ninty's not having any of it, with Nintendo of America PR manager Eric Walter saying that "we really don't want people storing every single game they buy on their drive." Sounds silly, but since VC titles are yours for keeps, Nintendo's position is that you can delete games and "go back and get them any time," or, presumably, build a small library of SD cards. This odd line of reasoning also led Walter to say that he likens the situation "to putting music on your iPod; you listen to it for a while, and then you get tired of it, and you pull it off, and you put some new stuff on." Clearly Walter does not know how often we listen to the Clash on our iPods -- or how often we rock Super Mario Brothers 1 through 64. Either way, it looks like the mothership has spoken for now -- looks like it's up to the third parties to figure out a way to make it all better.

[Thanks to everyone who sent this in]

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