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Submission + - IT Career Burnout: When the Thrill Is Gone (cio.com)

twailgum writes: "Burnout is as predictable in an IT professional's career as the long hours that precipitate it," notes a CIO.com article. "The demanding nature of IT jobs, coupled with a perceived lack of respect and appreciation, leads many IT professionals to lament, à la blues great B.B. King, that 'the thrill is gone.' Many eventually wonder whether a career in IT is still the right choice." What follows are seven practical ways to reignite your passion for your IT job, as suggested by IT professionals who've experienced burnout first-hand.

Submission + - IT Careers: Can You Survive Unemployment? (cio.com)

twailgum writes: If you lose your tech job, get ready for a wild ride on the emotional rollercoaster, reports this new CIO.com article. Your daily routines, lifestyle, relationships and identity will be upended, say IT execs who survived long job searches and unemployment to tell the tale.

Joblessness can lead to much more than financial ruin. It precipitates bouts of loneliness, feelings of inadequacy, even full-blown depression. Unemployment ravages people emotionally because it disrupts every aspect of their lives--their routines, identities and relationships. Mental health experts say those emotions are common among unemployed professionals, but they can cripple a person who needs to tap her self-esteem while job hunting in a tough market. Such emotional trauma doesn't bode well for the 14.9 million people who are currently unemployed.

If you're an unemployed IT pro and are trying to fight anxiety or depression, also see this list of proven ways to fight depression during a prolonged job search.

Submission + - Geek Pride: "Soft Skills" Are for Weenies (cio.com)

twailgum writes: Much has been made of the need for IT professionals to demonstrate soft skills--the ability to communicate, negotiate, and win friends and influence people. But a backlash against their importance is brewing. Observes blogger Meridith Levinson: These IT professionals are rejecting "soft skills" and, instead, measure their worth by their technical prowess. Levinson writes: "To them, the need for soft skills is a sign of technical impotence." Adds one commenter to her blog:

If you have to reach for the soft skills of cajoling and persuasion, maybe you don't have what it takes to hack it in IT. Let us remember that some folks in technical fields like IT pride themselves on NOT having social skills.


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