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IBM

Submission + - IBM's DB2 runs Oracle applications, say what? (ibm.com) 2

An anonymous reader writes: Just in time for the imminent acquisition of Sun by Oracle it seems Big Blue has finally realized that it's in an all out war and they are going for the jugular.
Apparently making DB2 9.7 for Linux, Unix, and Windows understand PL/SQL and extending their own SQL to also
understand Oracle's dialect (down to the dreaded (+) join syntax!) last year was just the opening salvo.
According to an IBM developerWorks article by their SQL Architect those DB2 developers in Toronto have upped the ante and provided an OCI (Oracle Client Interface) compatible client. Makes one wonder: What's next?
Given the importance of Oracle's DBMS to their stream revenue, as compared to the relevance of
DB2 for LUW to IBM in the big picture, I wonder how much room to maneuver Oracle actually has if it comes to an all out pricing-war.
Has anyone tried the "Oracle compatibility features" of DB2 and is
considering a move or extension of an application?
Certainly what's offered is not sufficient to easily port all applications out there.
But for just how many of those apps will what's provided be good enough?
Are we seeing the end of the SQL dialect wars, vendor lock-in, and a commoditization the DBMS market?

OS X

Apple Says Booting OS X Makes an Unauthorized Copy 865

recoiledsnake writes "Groklaw has an extensive look at the latest developments in the Psystar vs. Apple story. There's a nice picture illustrating the accusation by Apple that Psystar makes three unauthorized copies of OS X. The most interesting, however, is the last copy. From Apple's brief: 'Finally, every time Psystar turns on any of the Psystar computers running Mac OS X, which it does before shipping each computer, Psystar necessarily makes a separate modified copy of Mac OS X in Random Access Memory, or RAM. This is the third unlawful copy.' Psystar's response: 'Copying a computer program into RAM as a result of installing and running that program is precisely the copying that Section 117 provides does not constitute copyright infringement for an owner of a computer program. As the Ninth Circuit explained, permitting copies like this was Section 117's purpose.' Is Apple seriously arguing that installing a third party program and booting OS X results in copyright infringement due to making a derivative work and an unauthorized copy?"

Submission + - Apple says booting OS X makes an unauthorized copy 9

recoiledsnake writes: Groklaw has an extensive look at the latest developments in the Psystar vs. Apple story. There's a nice picture illustrating the accusation by Apple that Psystar makes three unauthorized copies of OS X. The most interesting however, is the last copy. From Apple's brief: "Finally, every time Psystar turns on any of the Psystar computers running Mac OS X, which it does before shipping each computer, Psystar necessarily makes a separate modified copy of Mac OS X in Random Access Memory, or RAM. This is the third unlawful copy." Psystar's response: "Copying a computer program into RAM as a result of installing and running that program is precisely the copying that Section 117 provides does not constitute copyright infringement for an owner of a computer program. As the Ninth Circuit explained, permitting copies like this was Section 117’s purpose." Is Apple seriously arguing that installing a third party program and booting OS X results in copyright infringement due to making a derivative work and an unauthorized copy?

Comment Re:Help! (Score 1, Insightful) 129

Ridiculous.
Do they really expect to be able to review all 80,000 + iPhone apps, 10,000+ Android apps, and everything else in every other app store? What are they going to do, attempt to pull every app until each one is reviewed? This sounds like some 60 year old executive finally upgraded his aging Nokia to an iPhone and thought it a good idea.
These apps are digital downloads from (generally) overseas sources, I'm sure there are plenty of programs you can download from the vastness that is the internet that contains content that people would object to. Do they review them? No.
And I know not of Stephen Conroy's involvement in this, but he's already under enough fire from the proposed Internet Filtering Scheme. Give it a rest!
Security

Submission + - Nmap 5.00 Released! (nmap.org)

iago-vL writes: "The long-awaited Nmap Security Scanner version 5.00 was just released (download)! This marks the most important release since 1997, and is a huge step in Nmap's evolution from a simple port scanner to an all-around security and networking tool suite. Significant performance improvements were made, and dozens of scripts were added. For example, Nmap can now log into Windows and perform local checks (PDF), including Conficker detection. New tools included in 5.00 are Ncat, a modern reimplementation of Netcat (with IPv6, SSL, NAT traversal, port redirection, and more!), and Ndiff, for quickly comparing scan results. Other tools are in the works for future releases, but we're still waiting for them to add email and ftp clients so we can finally get off Emacs!"
Intel

Submission + - SPAM: Intel scientist says enough of Moore's Law

circleddots writes: "An Intel scientist says enough to core and transistor expansion, he'd rather see a change in chip technology through atomtronics, carbon nanotubes and quantum computing. NSF is pouring money to fund research that could kill the concept of Moore's Law, ironically a concept paraded by Intel cofounder Gordon Moore."
Link to Original Source
The Courts

Submission + - Hacker Could Keep Money from Insider Trading

Reservoir Hill writes: "On Oct. 17, 2007, someone hacked into a computer system at IMS Health. A few minutes later Oleksandr Dorozhko, a Ukrainian resident, invested $41,671 in put options that would expire worthless three days later unless IMS shares plunged. The next morning IMS announced earnings and the share price did plunge, making $296,456 for Dorozhko by selling the puts. "Dorozhko's alleged 'stealing and trading' or 'hacking and trading' does not amount to a violation" of securities laws, Judge Naomi Reice Buchwald ruled last month. Although Dorozhko may have broken laws by stealing the information, "Dorozhko did not breach any fiduciary or similar duty 'in connection with' the purchase or sale of a security" and she ordered the SEC to let him have his profits. Through a strange anomaly in American securities laws a person who legally obtains insider information and trades on the basis of that information is breaking the law, while someone who illegally gets their hands on such information may not have violated the securities laws by trading on it. If her opinion stands, it will be very hard for the SEC to go after hackers in the future. The judge herself appreciated the absurdity of the situation, and expressed disappointment that the Justice Department had not brought criminal charges for computer hacking."
Education

Submission + - Parents don't want evolution taught. (sptimes.com) 5

MrMage writes: "Florida parents don't have much faith in evolution. Only 22 percent want public schools to teach an evolution-only curriculum, while 50 percent want only faith-based theories such as creationism or intelligent design, according to a new St. Petersburg Times survey. "I have a very firm religious background," said Betty Lininger of Lecanto, who is raising her 15-year-old niece and thinks public schools should teach intelligent design but not evolution. "I can't just shove it out the door.""

Sure evolution is a theory, but to disregard it for faith, in public schools? Where does the rest of the world stand?

User Journal

Journal SPAM: Oldest City 2

I was just reading this bit about St. Augustine and how it is the oldest city in the United States. I found it rich in irony that it quotes someone who says that few know about St. Augustine because it was not an English settlement. The reason that is funny to me, is because there are a few places I can think of that have been inhabited for much longer than St. Augustine. I think there is good evidence t

Education

Submission + - Google's Death at Indiana U. Highly Exaggerated?

msmoriarty writes: Looks like earlier reports of Indiana University dropping Google in favor of people-driven ChaCha search (as featured in this Slashdot item from Saturday) weren't exactly accurate. This afternoon the university's Vice President of Technology Brad Wheeler told a reporter from CampusTechnology.com that Google isn't going anywhere — at least not yet. From the article:



"...the deal with ChaCha is not an exclusive one, but one involving a variety of technologies, including ChaCha and Google. Reports have stated that IU planned to drop Google entirely from its technology repertoire; this is not the case, as the university continues to run searches off its Google Search Appliances, and a decision has not yet been made as to whether Google will be dropped from the mix or not.

Wheeler indicated that the university will likely reevaluate the use of Google Search Appliances in about a year when its current licenses expire.

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