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Comment Re:Let's Compare App Stores (Score 1) 114

[Buying a Mac instead of another computer] Seems liike the most versatile and most economically smart decision.

Unless you rely on sharing a computer with someone else in the household, such as a college student not living on campus. In this case, the computer you already have is $0, while the Mac is $599+.

Comment Undervalued currency (Score 1) 114

I understand if you're a kid or teen and jobless and your parents are on a budget, but as an adult likely earning decent money working in the tech industry

Even if so, someone living in a developing country will still feel the effects of the country's currency being undervalued compared to the United States dollar or the euro.

Comment Re:Not silly at all, consider context (Score 1) 114

You can start by giving me a list of things you can do on your iPhone that I can't do on an Android.

Buy music from a recording artist who makes his work available through iTunes but not Google Play Music or Amazon Music.

Play Tiny Wings.

Communicate with other people who use FaceTime on a Mac, iPhone, or iPad.

Comment Part of a botnet != ultimate attack target (Score 1) 160

For one thing, patches are ineffective against a bandwidth consumption attack.

Then updates don't matter and shouldn't be forced.

I was unclear. Against a bandwidth consumption attack, patches to the machine that is the ultimate target of the attack are ineffective, but patches to the machine that would form part of the botnet are effective.

I'm told a lot of these attacks target Internet-exposed devices other than PCs, such as modem-routers and older smartphones.

Then that has nothing to do with Windows updates and they shouldn't be forced.

They have much to do with Windows updates if a botnet is used to "target Internet-exposed devices other than PCs", and the machines that would form part of the botnet run Windows.

How do you think new vulnerabilities come about?

New vulnerabilities tend to be introduced with new functionality, not with patches focused solely on security.

The user is the only person who should get a say in what happens on their computer.

By that reasoning, the user should be held responsible and liable for all use of the user's computer as a botnet agent. If someone adds your unpatched computer to his botnet, and someone uses your computer to DDoS someone, you should go to jail for recklessly participating in said DDoS.

Comment Bandwidth consumption; no root; nonexistent patch (Score 1) 160

Are those other people unpatched too?

For one thing, patches are ineffective against a bandwidth consumption attack. For another, I'm told a lot of these attacks target Internet-exposed devices other than PCs, such as modem-routers and older smartphones. An ISP subscriber might not have authority to make and apply updates to the modem-router that the subscriber is leasing from the ISP, and the ISP might have neglected to do so. Or an update might not exist at all.

what happens when the attacker takes advantage of a vulnerability that is introduced by an update?

Is this nearly as common as an update removing a vulnerability?

Comment Would you prefer an interpreted crypto library? (Score 3, Insightful) 196

And how is that different than simply #including a crypto library, which has the added bonus that you can pick any number of crypto libraries.

I can see three ways to proceed:

A built-in crypto library
This runs at full speed and is available by default to the shared hosting customer.
An add-on crypto library compiled to native code and distributed as a PHP extension
This runs at full speed but requires the shared hosting customer to convince the hosting provider to install it.
An add-on crypto library written in pure PHP
This is available by default to the shared hosting customer but can run unacceptably slowly due to interpreter overhead.

Comment Defamation of title (Score 1) 103

If I made my livelihood on selling sheet music for my own songs, a handful of incorrect takedown notices that bumped me off Google would be devastating to my business

Likewise for a handful of incorrect notices of claimed infringement sent to your ISP. You can sue the bastards for defamation of title unless the claim is that your own song is substantially similar to one of their own.

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