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Microsoft

Submission + - Microsoft is hiring again: at $0.52/hr (nlcnet.org) 2

teknopurge writes: I actually like most MS products, which is why I was shocked to stumble across this story. 'KYE recruits hundreds-even up to 1,000-"work study students" 16 and 17 years of age, who work 15-hour shifts, six and seven days a week. In 2007 and 2008, dozens of the work study students were reported to be just 14 and 15 years old. A typical shift is from 7:45 a.m. to 10:55 p.m. ....Along with the work study students-most of whom stay at the factory three months, though some remain six months or longer-KYE prefers to hire women 18 to 25 years of age, since they are easier to discipline and control' Now I'm all for a global economy and the re-balancing of markets that comes with it, but it seems that there is some serious normalization that needs to be done in these economic cycles. The trend has been to move toward cheap-labor centers for the past 10 years or so. When is the backlash in the markets going to take place?(wages increases abroad, better working conditions, near-shoring becuase the off-shore costs are rising, etc...)
Education

We Rent Movies, So Why Not Textbooks? 398

Hugh Pickens writes "Using Netflix as a business model, Osman Rashid and Aayush Phumbhra founded Chegg, shorthand for 'chicken and egg,' to gather books from sellers at the end of a semester and renting — or sometimes selling — them to other students at the start of a new one. Chegg began renting books in 2007, before it owned any, so when an order came in, its employees would surf the Web to find a cheap copy. They would buy the book using Rashid's American Express card and have it shipped to the student. Eventually, Chegg automated the system. 'People thought we were crazy,' Rashid said. Now, as Chegg prepares for its third academic year in the textbook rental business, the business is growing rapidly. Jim Safka, a former chief executive of Match.com and Ask.com who was recently recruited to run Chegg, said the company's revenue in 2008 was more than $10 million, and this year, Chegg surpassed that in January alone."

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