Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Compare cell phone plans using Wirefly's innovative plan comparison tool ×

Submission + - How NASA steers the Int'l Space Station around asteroids & other debris (arstechnica.com)

willith writes: I got to sit down with ISS TOPO Flight Controller Josh Parris at the Houston Mission Control Center and talk about how NASA steers all 400 tons of the International Space Station around potential collisions, or "conjunctions," in NASA-parlance. The TOPO controller, with assistance from USSTRATCOM's big radars, keeps track of every object that will pass within a "pizza-box"-shaped 50km x 50km x 4km perimeter around the ISS. Actually moving the station is done with a combination of large control moment gyros and thrusters on both the Zvezda module and visiting vehicles. It's a surprisingly complex operation!

Submission + - RPi colocation is running out of IPv4 addresses (www.root.cz) 1

An anonymous reader writes: Raspberry Pi colocation is free housing for popular cheap mini computers. Currently it runs more than 600 of them and has more than 1000 new requests in the queue. Biggest problem is number of free IPv4 addresses. RIPE is no longer assigning and RPi colocation is running out of addresses.

Our IPv4 addresses are flying out the door and we have actually only a few hundred left. We also can't get new ones from RIPE, so we'll have to get creative soon.


Submission + - Discrete Log Problem Breakthrough Threatens Crypto

tbonefrog writes: Cryptographic ground truth is changing fast. In February Antoine Joux produced a new record subexponential discrete logarithm algorithm running at L(1/4) speed and beating the long-standing L(1/3) mark. On June 20 a quasipolynomial algorithm was announced at the Workshop on Number-Theoretic Algorithms for Asymmetric Cryptology in France, and explained by Stephen Galbraith

Discrete logarithm and factoring are different problems but progress on one tends to lead to progress in the other. Get a paper bank statement mailed to you each month, order some paper checks, and buy stamps and envelopes for paying your bills via snail mail.
Google

Submission + - Google Bans Online Anonymity While Patenting It

theodp writes: 'It's important to use your common name,' Google explains in its Google+ ground rules, 'so that the people you want to connect with can find you.' Using a 'secondary online identity,' the search giant adds, is a big Google+ no-no. 'There are lots of places where you can be anonymous online,' Betanews' Joe Wilcox notes. 'Google+ isn't one of them.' Got it. But if online anonymity is so evil, then what's the deal with Google's newly-awarded patent for Social Computing Personas for Protecting Identity in Online Social Interactions? 'When users reveal their identities on the internet,' Google explained to the USPTO in its patent application, 'it leaves them more vulnerable to stalking, identity theft and harassment.' So what's Google's solution? Providing anonymity to social networking users via an 'alter ego' and/or 'anonymous identity.' So does Google now believe that there's a genuine 'risk of disclosing a user's real identity'? Or is this just a case of Google's left hand not knowing what its right hand is patenting?
NASA

Submission + - First word on results from GRAIL, NASA's Moon gravity mission (nature.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Nature has advance word on the first science results from GRAIL, NASA's twin probes launched a year ago which are mapping the gravity of the Moon from lunar orbit. This is coming out in advance of any official publication or NASA release, so the data isn't available, but the story trails what the PI Maria Zuber told a Harvard CFA colloquium (http://www.cfa.harvard.edu/events/colloquia/fall12/zuber.html ) last week are some of the team's key scientific findings: including that the Moon's crust is substantially thinner than once thought; and some of the more speculative impact basins haven't been confirmed.
Security

Submission + - Bruce Schneier @ Black Hat: "The bad guys will always run faster" (securityweek.com)

wiredmikey writes: Last week at the Black Hat Conference, a panel of security and privacy experts talked bluntly about their mistrust of government, changing nature of cyber-attacks and exploits, and the future of security. Overall, Jeff Moss, founder of Black Hat, along with Adam Shostack, Marcus Ranum, and Bruce Schneier, engaged in a free-wheeling discussion of how enterprises have invested in security over the years and beefed up their defenses, but there was still a long way to go.

The panelists had all spoken at the original Black Hat conference in 1997 and were reunited in this session to discuss what had happened in security over the years, and what the future would look like for security. When the panel discussed where companies should focus their security spending, Moss said people (a good security staff) should be the priority.

After discussing various topics, the panelists were asked to weigh in on whether security will be better or worse in the future. The response was decidedly pessimistic across the board, as things will be “the same.”

“We’ll get better at running,” Moss said.

Schneier responded, “The bad guys will always run faster.

Math

Submission + - New Moxie Marlinspike Tool Cracks Crypto Passwords (threatpost.com)

Gunkerty Jeb writes: Moxie Marlinspike, the security and privacy researcher known for his SSLStrip, Convergence and RedPhone tools, has released a new tool that can crack passwords used for some VPNs and wireless networks that rely on encryption using Microsoft's MS-CHAPv2 protocol. Marlinspike discussed the tool during a talk at DEF CON over the weekend, and it is available for download.
Security

Submission + - Tracking Chinese Cyber-Espionage Botnets (krebsonsecurity.com)

wiredog writes: From Brian Krebs, reporting on a large scale Chinese cyber-espionage operation:

the infrastructure that frames these these spy machines generally points in one of two directions: one group’s infrastructure points back to Shanghai, the other to Beijing.

“There have to be hundreds of people involved, just to maintain this amount of infrastructure and this much activity and this many spear phishes, collecting so many documents, and writing this much malware,” Stewart said


Submission + - Molecular Pentafoil knot

Med-trump writes: Scientists now report that they have made a non-DNA molecular knot.
They created a 160-atom-loop with five crossing points, a molecular pentafoil knot. The researchers used a technique known as "self-assembly" to prepare the knot in a chemical reaction. Apparently 85% of the elasticity of natural rubber is due to knot-like entanglements in the rubber molecules chains.

Slashdot Top Deals

C Code. C Code Run. Run, Code, RUN! PLEASE!!!!

Working...