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Submission + - Malaysia Jet Made Radical Course Change at Time of Disappearance 2

Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes: The NYT reports that the Malaysian authorities now believe that a jetliner missing since Saturday may have radically changed course around the time that it stopped communicating with ground controllers. Gen. Rodzali Daud, was quoted in a Malaysian newspaper saying the military had received “signals” on Saturday that after the aircraft stopped communicating with ground controllers, it changed course sharply, from heading northeast to heading west, and flew hundreds of miles across Peninsular Malaysia and out over the Strait of Malacca, before the tracking went blank. According to the general’s account, the last sign of the plane was recorded at 2:40 a.m., and the aircraft was then near Pulau Perak, an island more than 100 miles off the western shore of the Malaysian peninsula. The assertion stunned aviation experts as well as officials in China, who had been told again and again that the authorities lost contact with the plane more than an hour earlier, when it was on course over the Gulf of Thailand, east of the peninsula. But the new account seemed to fit with the decision on Monday, previously unexplained, to expand the search area to include waters west of the peninsula. Without specifying why, the Malaysian authorities vastly expanded the search area to the west on Monday, implying that they believed there was a strong chance the plane had traveled there. No similar expansion was made to the east or the south. If the flight traveled west over Peninsular Malaysia, as the air force chief was quoted saying, it would have flown very close to a beacon in the city of Kota Bharu operated by Flightradar24, a global tracking system for commercial aircraft which means its transponder had either been knocked out of service by damage or had been shut off. "We see every aircraft that flies over there, even if it’s very, very low," says Mikael Robertsson,. "so if it flew over there, the transponder was off." Robertsson added that since the plane had been fully fueled for a trip to Beijing, it could have traveled a great distance beyond its last reported position. “The aircraft could have continued another five or six hours out into the ocean. It could have gone to India.”
Education

Submission + - LinuxWorld: Open Source, Closed Doors 2

dualscan337 writes: As a long time linux user and enthusiast I thought it was finally time to take the plunge and attend the LinuxWorld Conference next week out in San Francisco. I registered online to get the free Exhibit Hall Pass but this morning I received this email:

"Thank you for your interest LinuxWorld Conference & Expo San
Francisco, August 6-9, 2007.

Unfortunately, as a business-to-business event targeted
exclusively toward enterprise IT professionals, official show
policy prohibits students, and anyone under the age of 18, from
attending this event. Therefore, we must inform you that your
registration to attend LinuxWorld Conference & Expo is not valid
and you will not be permitted on the showfloor."

I'm a graduate student in the physical sciences and I realize that this is a business oriented event.. but what is to gain by maintaining this sort of closed door policy toward students? Let's not forget that a lot of code is contributed by the people they're not allowing inside the door. I have always felt that the power of open source was in the fact that anyone could participate/contribute. I feel that a conference whose slogan is "Open Source Rules — Find out why" and doesn't let me in because I'm a student misrepresents what Linux and Open Source is all about. What does slashdot think? Should I have planned on going to DefCon instead?

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