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Comment Re:Would it be positive for your customers? (Score 4, Informative) 158

Yes, more sponsored free data transfer and optimization from content providers. It's a grey area now. But "Stream Game of Thrones now without using your data, exclusively on AT&T" is something that carriers and content providers really want to do.

Comment Re:Ever the optimist is our Elon (Score 0) 426

90% of the work we're doing now (and probably closer to 100% of slashdotters' work) doesn't *need* to be done, but we do it anyway.

That's because the alternative is to just give them the things they need to live, which bothers a lot of people who like to take the position that the only moral way to survive is to work.

It has nothing to do with Maslow. If people's time wasn't taken up with bullshit jobs, and they instead were able to do work they found personally fulfilling without having to worry about working to survive, then their esteem and self-actualisation would be taken care of.

Comment Outsourcing (Score 1) 587

Outsourcing is a non-trivial affair. There are just about as many failures as successes.

Accepted economic theory is that capital is fungible, however, labor is not yet. That's the bottom line. Despite it's flaws, the Western way of doing business is superior to what happens in most of the world. Anyone who has worked with China, for example, can usually back that up.

Comment Uhh (Score 2, Interesting) 121

In 2012, an enterprising young Gizmodo blogger published the story of Shiva Ayyadurai, an MIT lecturer and renowned liar who pretends he invented email. Today, he adds another achievement to the resume, marrying Fran Drescher. Fran, you fucked up!

Yeah, I mean, Gawker probably would have lost this if they had taken it to trial. These are falsifiable claims, and interferring or attempting to in this way in a persons personal life would likely result in a good demonstration of "actual malice".

I mean, if it's just business, you do that. But this is digging into a persons personal life. That's not something you want a jury to weigh against the balancing act of "actual malice". As we saw in the main Hogan trial, it's not something you want to gamble with.

Comment I'd like to see this rule challenged (Score 1) 95

I would love to see this FTC rule challenged in Court. This is a very solid example of government overreach into private speech that they have labelled "commercial" by regulatory fiat. The entire concept of regulating this type of elective speech - where private individuals have elected to use a service which enables them to access what other people have published - is gravely disturbing to me. The FTC's view that this is a form of advertising under their control is very-outdated.

A Twitter post is much more like the answer you get when you say to a person - "What do you think?" than a form of advertising that targets people broadly.

Comment Re:linux etc (Score 2) 585

Liberalism ("Progressivism") is precisely what has led to the creation of the US prison state and fomented the spread of fascism in the US. I've personally watched it happening in real-time over the last 5+ decades.

Fuck that's funny. Even more so if you actually believe it.

There hasn't been a progressive Government in the USA for the better part of half a century, and 30-40 years for most of the rest of the western world (a handful of European countries aside, and even they've shifted significantly rightwards).

Right-wing Fascism evolved into right-wing Neoliberalism and it has been running the world since - at the absolute latest - the '80s. So the modern world shouldn't surprise anyone - the political right is the side of royalty, corporations, the church, the military, and other similar hereditary, conformist, strictly hierarchical, stratified, undemocratic organisations.

Comment Re:Reliability (Score 1) 209

You can't (easily and reliably) stretch a RAID across hosts.

Backblaze take a chunk of data and break it up into 20 smaller chunks (17 data + 3 parity) and then spread those 20 chunks across 20 different physical servers. You can't do that with RAID.

It would also reduce the overall load during disk rebuilds as well.

https://www.google.com.au/sear...

Comment Re:As it's been said... (Score 1) 621

Oh sorry, second after "What does it mean to leave the EU." Thanks for correcting me and strengthening my argument. These people had no fucking clue what just happened the day before.

*sigh*

Here's another explanation.

But the real point is it's an irrelevant and stupid argument. I mean - even if one were to accept that X number of people googling a term a day after a particular event must carry more weight than all the people who might have googled the same term every day before that event - are you seriously trying to argue Google trends should direct how to run a country ?

That's a glib way to hand-wave away any argument.

Your argument is that you can't see any possible positive outcome, therefore it was a bad idea.

Comment Re:As it's been said... (Score 1) 621

Would you think a second vote would be more acceptable if as a condition of holding it, there could be no third vote?

No, I don't think there is any reason to hold a second vote at all.

And it's not deceitful to suggest that they made an informed and well-considered decision when the most popular search query in the UK the following day was "what is the EU"?

no it wasn't.

When the decision was objectively stupid unless you hate the concept of the EU's power more than the trillions in economic damage currently being wrought? The decision to leave is not a decision an informed populace would make for any reason other than an overpowering tantrum of xenophobia and jingoism, which didn't seem to match the public's mood. It was made due to extreme ignorance.

These are religious statements.

Comment Re:As it's been said... (Score 1) 621

Do you think there would be a petition for a third vote if the outcome was the same?

Yes.

I don't think so. It's the same reason you usually don't ask a person if they're sure more than once, and important switches only have only one safety cover on them.

The "safety cover" was weeks of campaigning and years of debate leading up to the referendum.

Do not try to suggest the idea of leaving the EU was sprung upon the people with little warning. It's just deceitful.

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