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Submission + - What is the best web ui toolkit? And why? (wikipedia.org)

Qbertino writes: The great thing about today is that the open standards web has basically won the platform wars. Flash is super-dead and it's a paradise of abundance of FOSS technologies all around in the frontend and backend. You could also call it a jungle. What JS/CSS/HTML5 UI toolkit would you recommend for real world projects and why? What have you had good experiences with and built working real-world products with? As a web developer it's not that I couldn't find something fitting, but I'm interested in other peoples experiences and recommendations and your educated opinion. Thanks.

Submission + - Proposed US Law Would Allow Employers to Demand Genetic Testing (businessinsider.com)

capedgirardeau writes: A little-noticed bill moving through the US Congress would allow companies to require employees to undergo genetic testing or risk paying a penalty of thousands of dollars, and would let employers see that genetic and other health information. Giving employers such power is now prohibited by US law, including the 2008 genetic privacy and nondiscrimination law known as GINA. The new bill gets around that landmark law by stating explicitly that GINA and other protections do not apply when genetic tests are part of a 'workplace wellness' program.

Submission + - Stunning close-up of Saturn's moon, Pan, reveals a space empanada (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: Astronomers have long known that Pan, one of Saturn’s innermost moons, has an odd look. Based on images taken from a distance, researchers have said it looks like a walnut or a flying saucer. But now, NASA’s Cassini probe has delivered stunning close-ups of the 35-kilometer-wide icy moon, and it might be better called a pan-fried dumpling or an empanada.

Submission + - Alien life could thrive in the clouds of failed stars (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: There’s an abundant new swath of cosmic real estate that life could call home – and the views would be spectacular. Floating out by themselves in the Milky Way galaxy are perhaps a billion cold brown dwarfs, objects many times as massive as Jupiter but not big enough to ignite as a star. According to a new study, layers of their upper atmospheres sit at temperatures and pressures resembling those on Earth, and could host microbes that surf on thermal updrafts.

The idea expands the concept of a habitable zone to include a vast population of worlds that had previously gone unconsidered. “You don’t necessarily need to have a terrestrial planet with a surface,” says Jack Yates, a planetary scientist at the University of Edinburgh in the United Kingdom, who led the study.

Submission + - Microsoft Outlook injecting advertisement and URL into personal email

mr_diags writes: Recently GoDaddy's iPhone email client was retired and they aggressively encouraged users to migrate to Microsoft Outlook client. I detest most Microsoft products and ended up migrating to Spark. My wife took the path of least resistance and migrated to Outlook for iPhone. Yesterday I received a short email from her and noticed a live hypertext link “Get Outlook for iOS” in her email. I asked her why she wrote that and she said she did not. Examining the email source it clearly shows the email sent from her Outlook client has text embedded in the body of her email in both the plain text and HTML sections of the payload – including a live URL.

Yes, she needs to check if Outlook client had some default configuration when installed that embedded the advertisement, maybe a default signature. And who knows what the EULA she blindly accepted allowed MS to do, but isn’t this effectively a hack of a person’s personal email to inject an advertisement?

Content of the email, scrubbed of personal addresses:

------=_Part_13617_1251458795.1470690450092
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

It's a white 6.

Get Outlook for iOS

Received: (qmail 23638 invoked by uid 30297); 8 Aug 2016 21:07:31 -0000
Received: from unknown (HELO p3plibsmtp02-14.prod.phx3.secureserver.net) ([72.167.218.25])
(envelope-sender <xxxxx@xxxxx.com>)
by p3plsmtp01-05.prod.phx3.secureserver.net (qmail-1.03) with SMTP
for <yyyy@yyyyy.us>; 8 Aug 2016 21:07:31 -0000
Received: from p3plsmtpa12-02.prod.phx3.secureserver.net ([68.178.252.231])
by p3plibsmtp02-14.prod.phx3.secureserver.net with bizsmtp
id Uku71t01H50JyDQ01l7WVW; Mon, 08 Aug 2016 14:07:31 -0700
Received: from mail.outlook.com ([52.32.165.217])
by p3plsmtpa12-02.prod.phx3.secureserver.net with
id Ul7W1t00A4hkzKG01l7Wm9; Mon, 08 Aug 2016 14:07:30 -0700
Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2016 21:07:30 +0000 (UTC)
From: xxxxx < xxxxx@xxxxx.com >
To: yyyy@yyyyy.us
Message-ID: <42D594FBB05BB1EC.2A5FFCE7-7B0A-44C6-8158-660A799F2AC9@mail.outlook.com>
In-Reply-To: <20160807214047.a3cf85ee342f91baffbcbe5e7a33596d.19fe9dae3e.wbe@email01.godaddy.com>
References: <20160807214047.a3cf85ee342f91baffbcbe5e7a33596d.19fe9dae3e.wbe@email01.godaddy.com>
Subject: Re: iPhone screens
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
boundary="----=_Part_13617_1251458795.1470690450092"
X-Mailer: Outlook for iOS and Android
X-Nonspam: Whitelist

------=_Part_13617_1251458795.1470690450092
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

It's a white 6.

Get Outlook for iOS

On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 12:40 AM -0400, <yyyy@yyyyy.us> wrote:

=C2=A0 =C2=A0Your screen parts shipped and ETA is Wednesday delivery.=C2=A0=
=C2=A0For your friends iPhone6 I've searched and found iPhone 6 — not 6plu=
s — screen repair kits for under $30, so depending on their model it may be=
reasonably priced to get the parts.

------=_Part_13617_1251458795.1470690450092
Content-Type: text/html; charset=utf-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

<html><head></head><body><div>It's a white 6.<br><br><div class="acompli_signature">Get <a href="https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/outlook-com/mobile/?WT.mc_id=outlook_app_signature_1">Outlook for iOS</a></div><br></div><br><br><br>
<div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 12:40 AM -0400, <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:yyyy@yyyyy.us" target="_blank">yyyy@yyyyy.us</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<br>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

<div dir="3D&quot;ltr&quot;">
<span style="font-family:Verdana; color:#000000; font-size:10pt;"><div>&nbsp; &nbsp;Your screen parts shipped and ETA is Wednesday delivery.</div><div>&nbsp; &nbsp;For your friends iPhone6 I've searched and found iPhone 6 — not 6plus — screen repair kits for under $30, so depending on their model it may be reasonably priced to get the parts.</div></span>

</div>

</blockquote>
</div>
</body></html>
------=_Part_13617_1251458795.1470690450092--

Submission + - 1 In 3 Americans Report Financial Losses Due To Being Defrauded (helpnetsecurity.com)

An anonymous reader writes: With nearly half of Americans reporting they have been tricked or defrauded, citizens are concerned that the Internet is becoming less safe and want tougher federal and state laws to combat online criminals, according to the Digital Citizens Alliance. In the survey of 1,215 Americans, 46 percent said they had been the victim of a scam or fraud, had credit card information stolen, or had someone steal their identity. One in three Americans reported suffering financial loss – with 10 percent reporting that the loss had been over $1,000.

Submission + - Misuse of Language: 'Cyber' (threatpost.com)

msm1267 writes: The terms “cyber war” and “cyber weapon” are thrown around casually, often with little thought to their non-“cyber” analogs. Many who use the terms “cyber war” and “cyber weapon” relate these terms to “attack,” framing the conversation in terms of acceptable responses to “attack” (namely, “strike-back,” “hack-back,” or an extreme interpretation of the vague term “active defense”).

In this op-ed, information security experts Dave Dittrick and Katherine Carpeneter discuss two problematic issues: first, we illustrate the misuse of the terms “cyber war” and “cyber weapon,” to raise awareness of the potential dangers that aggressive language brings to the public and the security community; and second, we address the reality that could exist when private citizens (and/or corporations) want to act aggressively against sovereign nations and the undesirable results those actions could produce.

Dittrich and Carpenter discuss these topics through the lens of the recent furor around the cyber incident at the Democratic National Committee.

Submission + - Top-Level Cyber Espionage Group Uncovered After Years Of Stealthy Attacks (helpnetsecurity.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Symantec and Kaspersky Lab researchers have uncovered another espionage group that is likely backed by a nation-state. The former have dubbed the threat actor Strider, wile the latter named it ProjectSauron (after a mention in the code of one of the malware modules the group deploys). According to the researchers, evidence of ProjectSauron’s activity can be found as far back as 2011, and as near as early 2016. Within that period, the group has targeted at least 30 organizations around the world – Russia, China, Sweden, Belgium, Iran, Rwanda, (possibly) Italy. The complexity of the malware used, the fact that it remained hidden for so long, the nature of the victimized organizations (government and military entities, embassies, telecoms, scientific research centers), and the nature of the data collected and exfiltrated all point to a state-backed attack group, but it’s impossible to say for sure which one.

Submission + - London's Metropolitan Police Still Running 27,000 Windows XP Desktops

An anonymous reader writes: London’s Met Police has missed its deadline for abandoning the out-of-date operating system Windows XP, as findings reveal 27,000 computers still run on the software two years after official support ended. Microsoft stopped issuing updates and patches for Windows XP in Spring 2014, meaning that any new bugs and flaws in the operating system are left open to attack. A particularly risky status for the UK capital’s police force – itself running operations against hacking and other cybercrime activity. The figures were disclosed by Conservative politician Andrew Boff. The Greater London Assembly member said: ‘The Met should have stopped using Windows XP in 2014 when extended support ended, and to hear that 27,000 computers are still using it is worrying.’ As in similar cases across civil departments, the core problem is bespoke system development, and the costs and time associated with integrating a new OS with customized systems.

Submission + - EFF Asks FTC To Demand 'Truth In Labeling' For DRM (techdirt.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Interesting move by Cory Doctorow and the EFF in sending some letters to the FTC making a strong case that DRM requires some "truth in labeling" details in order to make sure people know what they're buying. The argument is pretty straightforward (PDF): "The legal force behind DRM makes the issue of advance notice especially pressing. It’s bad enough to when a product is designed to prevent its owner from engaging in lawful, legitimate, desirable conduct — but when the owner is legally prohibited from reconfiguring the product to enable that conduct, it’s vital that they be informed of this restriction before they make a purchase, so that they might make an informed decision. Though many companies sell products with DRM encumbrances, few provide notice of these encumbrances. Of those that do, fewer still enumerate the restrictions in plain, prominent language. Of the few who do so, none mention the ability of the manufacturer to change the rules of the game after the fact, by updating the DRM through non-negotiable updates that remove functionality that was present at the time of purchase." In a separate letter (PDF) from EFF, along with a number of other consumer interest groups, but also content creators like Baen Books, Humble Bundle and McSweeney's, they suggest some ways that a labeling notice might work.

Submission + - Solar Impulse off on the last leg (bbc.com)

AppleHoshi writes: The BBC is reporting that Solar Impulse, the all electric aeroplane making a circumnavigation of the globe, has left Cairo on the 17th and final leg of the epic journey. The Solar Impulse team estimates a 48-hour flight to the destination (and the staring point for the flight, last year), Abu Dhabi. All is not plain sailing, though. Despite the flight being mostly over desert where there's generally plenty of sunshine, the pilot, Bertrand Piccard, may have problems with the desert heat and the strong thermal updraughts which it creates.

Submission + - Do Gut Bacteria Rule Our Minds? (ucsf.edu)

giorgioarmani writes: It sounds like science fiction, but it seems that bacteria within us – which greatly outnumber our own cells – may very well be affecting both our cravings and moods to get us to eat what they want, and often are driving us toward obesity.In an article published this week in the journal BioEssays, researchers from UC San Francisco, Arizona State University and University of New Mexico concluded from a review of the recent scientific literature that microbes influence human eating behavior and dietary choices to favor consumption of the particular nutrients they grow best on, rather than simply passively living off whatever nutrients we choose to send their way.

Submission + - SPAM: Can our local supercluster defeat the accelerating Universe's expansion?

StartsWithABang writes: When dark energy was discovered, and the expansion of the Universe was shown to be accelerating, there was concurrently another puzzle that received much less attention: the problem of the Great Attractor. Galaxies appear to move due to both the Hubble expansion and the local gravitational field, but the gravity from the galaxies we saw didn’t account for all the motion. There must have been an additional set of masses, revealed only in the 2010s with the identification of the supercluster Laniakea. All the galaxies in our local neighborhood are headed towards it, but are we moving fast enough to overcome the expansive pull of dark energy? The answer looks to be no.

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