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Math

Submission + - Don't use a Kindle for Math or CompSci books (wordpress.com)

00_NOP writes: Many Kindle users who read technical books will be used to having to handle what looks like second-class edits of the book: the ease of use of the device (just) making up for the problems caused by missing and misplaced paragraphs and non-Roman letters and symbols. But my experience in the last 24 hours has meant I will be avoiding using the device for technical reading — especially after a leading technical publisher told me the issue was not their editing, but the Kindle itself.
Android

Submission + - Adobe to Nick Flash Player off the Android store from 15th August (paritynews.com) 1

hypnosec writes: Adobe has announced that it will be making the Flash Player for Android unavailable for new devices and users from August 15 in continuation of its plan to discontinue development of Flash Player for mobile browsers. The company announced its decision through a blog post and further said that only those users who have already installed the flash player on their devices will be receiving any future updates. To ensure that this is the case, Adobe is going to make configuration changes on its Google Play Flash Player page.
United States

Submission + - Heat wave shuts down US nuclear reactor (nhk.or.jp)

AmiMoJo writes: "A record heat wave in the United States has led to a reactor shutdown at a nuclear power plant after its cooling water became too warm. The operator of the Millstone Nuclear Power Station in the state of Connecticut says it shut down one of two reactors on Monday evening."
Businesses

Submission + - Natural Gas Fracking Causes Plunge in CO2 Emissions (examiner.com) 2

MarkWhittington writes: "Natural gas fracking, in which fluids are injected in a shale formation to force natural gas to the surface, has caused an economic boom in places such as the Eagle Ford formation in south Texas, according to CNBC. The natural gas fracking boom seems also to have fixed a situation that has vexed environmentalists, according to Investor’s Business Daily. The natural gas fracking boom has caused a plunge in CO2 output, down to 1990s levels."
Censorship

Submission + - How Close Is America to a Closed Internet? (vice.com)

pigrabbitbear writes: "Three years after Facebook-friendly dissidents took to the streets of Tehran and made techno-optimists giddy about the Internet’s liberating potential, things have gotten bleak. Once again, the mullahs are taking on democracy-minded netizens — but nowadays, the government is the one getting creative with technology. And they’re winning, doing things to Internet access that makes China’s “Great Firewall” seem tame."
Idle

Submission + - Medieval "Lingerie" From 15th Century Castle Could Rewrite Fashion History (ecouterre.com)

fangmcgee writes: Archaeologists have unearthed several 500-year-old bras that some experts say could rewrite fashion history. While they’ll hardly send pulses racing by today’s standards, the lace-and-linen underpinnings predate the invention of the modern brassiere by hundreds of years. Found hidden under the floorboards of Lengberg Castle in Austria’s East Tyrol, along with some 2,700 textile fragments and one completely preserved pair of (presumably male) linen underpants, the four intact bras and two fragmented specimens are thought to date to the 15th century, a hypothesis scientists later confirmed through carbon-dating.
Security

Submission + - Sony Music Greece falls to hackers (sophos.com)

xsee writes: Hackers: 6, Sony: 0. It appears an attacker has performed a SQL injection attack against SonyMusic.gr. The latest attack has exposed usernames, real names, email addresses and more. Is Sony's network being used as the world's largest public penetration test?
Android

Submission + - Rooted devices blocked from Android Movie Market (tekgoblin.com) 2

tekgoblin writes: "Google has released the Android Movie Market to Android tablets with Honeycomb 3.1 and in a few weeks for users with Froyo and Gingerbread. However Google has stipulated that the Android Movie Market will only be available to Android devices which are not rooted. So if you have a rooted Android device, don't expect to download anything from the Android Movie Market any time soon (or at least until a workaround is found)."
Apple

Submission + - iTunes upgrade forces users to buy new OSX (guardian.co.uk) 1

NoAkai writes: "The Guardian writes this about newer iDevices not being supported on older versions of OSX: "[...]I connected the shuffle to our computer, but a message came up saying the iPod "cannot be used because it requires iTunes version 10.0 or later". So I downloaded iTunes 10, but then another message popped up: "Open Failed This package type requires Mac OS X 10.5." It was the same story with the iPhone 4.""
Power

Submission + - Swiss to end use of nuclear power (reuters.com)

mdsolar writes: "Energy minister Doris Leuthard is set to propose Switzerland gradually exits nuclear power, two Swiss newspapers reported on Sunday, citing sources close to the government.

The multi-party Swiss government was expected to make an announcement on nuclear policy on Wednesday and may recommend an exit.

Switzerland's five nuclear reactors generate about 40 percent of the country's electricity."

Education

Submission + - Prof Questions Sink-or-Swim Intro to CS Courses 2

theodp writes: 'After having taught introductory programming (CS 1) for the past six years,' writes GVSU's Zack Kurmas, 'and having watched many students struggle through this course and the subsequent course (CS 2), I have come to the conclusion that it is absurd to expect students who don't have any prior programming experience to be well prepared to study Computer Science after a single 15-week course (i.e., CS 1). I believe that expecting a student to learn to program well enough to study Computer Science in a single 15-week course is almost as absurd as expecting a student with no instrumental musical experience to be ready to join the university orchestra after 15 weeks.' Kurmas' frustrations are not unlike those voiced by Physics prof Dr. Yung Tae Kim, who argues the up-or-out, one-size-fits-all rigid pace approach to learning set by teachers and administrators is as absurd as telling a toddler, 'You have ten weeks to walk, and if you can't, you get an F and you're not allowed to try to walk anymore.'
Government

Submission + - RIAA lobbyist becomes federal judge, rules on file

suraj.sun writes: RIAA lobbyist becomes federal judge, rules on file-sharing cases:

Last week, Washington, DC federal judge Beryl Howell ruled on three mass file-sharing lawsuits. Judges in Texas, West Virginia, and Illinois had all ruled recently that such lawsuits were defective in various ways, but Howell gave her cases the green light; attorneys could use the federal courts to sue thousands of people at once and then issue mass subpoenas to Internet providers.

Beryl Howell isn't the only judge to believe this, but her important ruling is especially interesting because of Howell's previous work: lobbying for the recording industry during the time period when the RIAA was engaged in its own campaign of mass lawsuits against individuals. The news, first reported in a piece at TorrentFreak, nicely illustrates the revolving door between government and industry.

ARSTechnica : http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2011/03/riaa-lobbyist-becomes-federal-judge-rules-on-file-sharing-cases.ars
Open Source

Submission + - Use Linux and WebDAV to Facilitate Online Collabor (serverwatch.com)

An anonymous reader writes: There are many options for online collaboration, but WebDAV remains a useful and straightforward way to share files. Software support at both the server and client ends sweetens the deal further.

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