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Businesses

EA To Charge For Game Demos 313

Kohato brings word of a new Electronic Arts marketing strategy that aims to start monetizing game demos. According to industry analyst Michael Patcher after an EA investor visit, the publisher will start selling "premium downloadable content" prior to a game's release for $10-$15 that is essentially a longer-than-usual demo. Patcher said, "I think that the plan is to release PDLC at $15 that has 3-4 hours of gameplay, so [it has] a very high perceived value, then [EA will] take the feedback from the community (press and players) to tweak the follow-on full game that will be released at a normal packaged price point." He also made reference to a comment from EA's CEO John Riccitiello that "the line between packaged product sales and digital revenues would soon begin to blur."
Google

YouTube Passes Yahoo As #2 Search Engine 125

Dekortage writes "According to the latest ComScore rankings, YouTube's search traffic for August surpassed Yahoo's. The latter dropped roughly 5% in traffic from July. Among other things, this means that Google now owns both of the top two search engines. AdAge further speculates on Google's experimental 'promoted videos' cost-per-click advertising on YouTube, suggesting the obvious: more money."
Windows

Submission + - Beware Office 2003 SP3 (microsoft.com) 1

steppin_razor_LA writes: "In the name of security, Office 2003 SP3 disables a number of features instead of fixing them. For example, Office 2003 SP3 breaks the ability to view TIFFs by removing the file association between them and the Microsoft Office Document Imaging. Corporate users are left with either trying to find a third party TIFF viewer or attempting to replace the removed file association and ignoring the security warnings.

From Microsoft: ".Tif files and .mdi files are no longer associated with Microsoft Office Document Imaging. Additionally, these files no longer open in Microsoft Office Document Imaging by default."

Additional information is available at: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/938813"

Security

Submission + - What workstation monitoring software do you use? 2

An anonymous reader writes: I am one of two IT personnel at the small company I work for. My boss recently expressed interest in monitoring the usage of our workstations. We run a Windows Domain with 20 computers. There is 1 administrator account and all other users log on with restricted user accounts. So far we've already tried one software package called BeAware Corporate. It seemed like it was exactly what my boss wanted. The only problem with this software is that it would only function properly when logged on as an administrator. We would rather not give our users administrator privileges. In particular he would like to monitor programs used, websites visited, and emails. He would also like for it to act sort of like a surveillance camera system in that it would take screenshots of all the workstations at set intervals. Additional features a plus. Ideally, the usage information from each computer would be inserted into a central database. Is there any software out there that does these things without requiring everyone to be an administrator?

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