Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!


Forgot your password?
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Submission + - Australian Devs Launch Crowd Funding for Open Software, Open Hardware, Router 3

An anonymous reader writes: Australian devs have launched a crowd funding campaign to market an open software, open hardware platform to protect against wholesale snooping. Stilgherrian from ZDNet writes:

If Redfish's crowdfunding campaign is successful, the ORP1 will fill a valuable niche in the marketplace: A high-performance router that's available commercially with all the right certifications, rather than having to be built by a hobbyist, which has the potential to dramatically improve privacy protection for ordinary households.

While it's clear from the specs that they're targeting commercial grade routers, the hardware could just as easily run other applications requiring higher performance than is available on platforms like the rPi and Beaglebone. Can a completely open system compete against tier 2 and tier 3 companies in this field?

Submission + - Seagate Leaking Customer Data

inject_hotmail.com writes: I just discovered that Seagate Recovery Services online submission form is leaking customer data. If you've ever submitted contact information to them, or any of their subsidiaries, anyone else on the Internet can find out your name, address, phone number (and a little bit more) by entering your Email address in the "Email Address" field.

I submitted data 5 years ago to a company that Seagate acquired 3 years ago (a different Email address), and my information is available for all to see.

Here's how it works: Once you enter the Email address, click off of the input field and wait for 3 seconds to see if the rest of the fields become populated. If not, the Email address is not in their system. If so, you are presented with the person's data. Furthermore, if data is present, the fields are disabled, so it's not possible to edit/remove it.

Check it out: https://services.seagate.com/online_request_form.aspx — enter test@test.com and you'll see some guy's information from Texas.


Submission + - Chrome hits 20% share as Microsoft continues slide (networkworld.com)

jbrodkin writes: "Google Chrome's rise in popularity has been remarkably fast and it's just hit a new milestone: more than 20% of all browser usage, according to StatCounter. Chrome rose from only 2.8% in June 2009 to 20.7% worldwide in June 2011, while Microsoft's Internet Explorer fell from 59% to 44% in the same time frame. Firefox dropped only slightly in the past two years, from 30% to 28%. While other browser trackers show Chrome with a lower percentage, there's a reason: StatCounter tracks total surfing, not the number of users. It's the Web's power users who are pushing Chrome to new heights."

Comment Re:Does your tax money go where you want? (Score 1) 295

I think that's inaccurate (especially the claim that the DoD and its expert propagandists somehow milked the creation of the internet for military gain). But it's worth noting that something like the internet would have evolved anyway. It's a natural progression in networking, bordering on the obvious. I think that's a more solid argument.

Comment Re:Consistent Histories? (Score 1) 365

In this case, you have to "measure" the particle in a particular way to retrieve the energy, and that way depends on what happened to the particle on the other side while the energy is being "pumped in" (so you cannot know in advance).

So you take a trillions and trillions and trillions of particles, and start measuring them randomly at once... Eventually you get lucky, and one of them gives you a return on energy. Poof, instant information transfer, but without having the data that you "needed" to do it. No waiting in line!

Comment Re:Battery powered aircraft:Completely unrealistic (Score 1) 276

The efficiency of an Lycoming IO-540K1A5 peaks at 32%, and the Thielert Centurion diesel peaks at 40%. An electric motor peaks at around 80%, but controller etc has an efficinecy of at most 95%, and batteries can not be drained more than 74%, so the total is 64% usable energy. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_density#Energy_density_in_energy_storage_and_in_fuel/ lists Li-Ion with 0.5MJ/kg, and Gasoline at 46.4MJ/kg. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_density#Energy_density_in_energy_storage_and_in_fuel
That is pretty accurately 1%, and you are somewhat right in that when adjusted for system efficiency, the ratio is 2.1%

Still order of magnitude away for useful.

Comment Re:Wow, so yet another screen size (Score 1) 134

I'm not a developer, but even so, I have a hard time with this so called screen size problem. I'm typing this on a 19 inch 1440x900 screen, but Chrome would work just fine in 800x600, or 1024x768 or my 10.1 inch, 1368x768 netbook screen. Why is so hard develop for Android with regard to screen size? Nevertheless, it seems that all Android 2.0 have the same resolution, but different sizes. Or am I wrong?

Slashdot Top Deals

The Shuttle is now going five times the sound of speed. -- Dan Rather, first landing of Columbia