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Submission + - Music Industry Sues Irish Government for Piracy (activepolitic.com)

bs0d3 writes: The music industry has initiated a lawsuit against the Irish government for not having blocking laws on the books; on the theory that if blocking laws were in place then filesharing would go away. On Tuesday the music industry issued a plenary summons against the Irish government which is the first step towards making this litigation possible. This all began in October 2010 (EMI v. UPC), when an Irish judge ruled that Irish law did not permit an order to be made against an ISP requiring blocking of websites. Recently several ISPs across the European Union have been ordered by courts to block thepiratebay.org through strange legal maneuvers. Countries whose laws have enough loopholes to abuse may be able to fend off US interference for now.

Submission + - Australia vs Encyclopedia Dramatica

An anonymous reader writes: Australia has featured prominently in technology-related news in recent times, due to its controversial decision to implement a mandatory national filter of "refused classification" content (earning it a place on Reporters Without Borders' 2010 enemies of the internet report, as well as the growing list of video games being banned because Australia lacks an 18+ rating for video games. Even content such as the film "V for Vendetta" continues to be banned online in Australia if age verification software is not used, as Apple discovered last year.

The Australian Human Rights commission now intends to prosecute Joseph Evers, the owner of the site Encyclopedia Dramatica, over a satirical article on Australia's Aboriginal population, which appears on the site. The controversial site has also attracted attention in Australia due to an article mocking the death of a murdered 8-year-old girl. While this is clearly not popular speech, Evers resides in the United States where the site's servers are kept, and where freedom of speech is constitutionally protected. This makes it unlikely for the prosecution to succeed, however it does highlight growing concerns about the worsening internet censorship within Australia.

Beliefs Conform To Cultural Identities 629

DallasMay writes "This article describes an experiment that demonstrates that people don't put as much weight on facts as they do their own belief about how the world is supposed to work. From the article: 'In one experiment, Braman queried subjects about something unfamiliar to them: nanotechnology — new research into tiny, molecule-sized objects that could lead to novel products. "These two groups start to polarize as soon as you start to describe some of the potential benefits and harms," Braman says. The individualists tended to like nanotechnology. The communitarians generally viewed it as dangerous. Both groups made their decisions based on the same information. "It doesn't matter whether you show them negative or positive information, they reject the information that is contrary to what they would like to believe, and they glom onto the positive information," Braman says.'"

Submission + - Australian Internet Filtering Scheme Gets Green Li (theage.com.au)

An anonymous reader writes: Yes, folks, it's true: the Australian Government, on the back of the technical trials, has declared that it will be introducing legislation to make Internet filtering mandatory for all Australian ISPs. Watch the speed of Australian 'net access slow significantly; innocent websites get blocked; and the bad guys accessing the stuff they want regardless. Sigh. Anybody have a good job going in New Zealand, by any chance?

Submission + - Canada sues Google for Gmail identities (dailyfinance.com)

hessian writes: "A Canadian court has ordered Google (GOOG) to turn over the identities of anonymous Gmail users who had accused York University faculty members of fraud and dishonesty. Like similar cases in the U.S., the York incident shows just how easy it is for courts to allow authorities to gain access to "our" personal information."

Submission + - iPhone 3.1 update disables tethering (apple.com)

jole writes: "The newest iPhone 3.1 update intentionally removed tethering functionality from all phones operating in networks that are not Apple partners. This is not limited to hacked or jailbroken phones, but also includes expensive "officially supported" factory unlocked phones. To make the problem worse Apple has made it impossible to downgrade back to working 3.0 version for iPhone 3GS phones."

Submission + - ISPs asked to cut off malware-infected PCs (itnews.com.au) 2

bennyboy64 writes: "Australia's Internet Industry Association has put forward a new code of conduct that suggests ISPs contact, and in some cases disconnect, customers that have malware-infected computers.

"Once an ISP has detected a compromised computer or malicious activity on its network, it should to take action to address the problem. ISPs should therefore attempt to identify the end user whose computer has been compromised, and contact them to educate them about the problem," the new code states.

The code won't be mandatory but it's expected the ISP indutry will take it up if they are to work with the Australian Government in preventing the many botnets operating in Australia."


Submission + - Charles Darwin film too controversial for America (telegraph.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: A British film about Charles Darwin has failed to find a US distributor because his theory of evolution is too controversial for American audiences, according to its producer. The film was chosen to open the Toronto Film Festival and has its British premiere on Sunday. It has been sold in almost every territory around the world, from Australia to Scandinavia. However, US distributors have resolutely passed on a film which will prove hugely divisive in a country where, according to a Gallup poll conducted in February, only 39 per cent of Americans believe in the theory of evolution. The full article can be found here

UK Court Rejects Encryption Key Disclosure Defense 708

truthsearch writes "Defendants can't deny police an encryption key because of fears the data it unlocks will incriminate them, a British appeals court has ruled. The case marked an interesting challenge to the UK's Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA), which in part compels someone served under the act to divulge an encryption key used to scramble data on a PC's hard drive. The appeals court heard a case in which two suspects refused to give up encryption keys, arguing that disclosure was incompatible with the privilege against self incrimination. In its ruling, the appeals court said an encryption key is no different than a physical key and exists separately from a person's will."

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