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Submission + - New York Times Suffers Redaction Failure, Exposes Name Of NSA Agent And Targeted (hitb.org)

An anonymous reader writes: It appears as if the New York Times, in its latest publication of leaked NSA documents, failed to properly redact the PDF it uploaded, exposing the name of the NSA agent who composed the presentation as well as the name of a targeted network. uh...woops. sorry.

Submission + - The Tardis flies! Fans build flying life size version! (suasnews.com)

garymortimer writes: Congratulations to Devon based multirotor operators http://www.flyonix.com/ Looks like the transition to forward flight was a bit of an issue.

Three fans built their own iconic blue police box to celebrate the show’s 50th anniversary.

Ben Whiting, 32, Rupert Brandon-King, 31, and Ben Bailey, 25, worked together on the project ahead of its maiden flight over the countryside in Hatherleigh, Devon, this week.

Submission + - Porn Surfing Execs Infecting Corporate Networks With Malware (securityweek.com)

wiredmikey writes: According to a recent survey of malware analysts at U.S. enterprises, 40% of the time a device used by a member the senior leadership team became infected with malware was due to executives visiting a pornographic website. The study, from ThreatTrack Security, also found that nearly 6 in 10 of the malware analysts have investigated or addressed a data breach that was never disclosed by their company.

When asked to identify the most difficult aspects of defending their companies' networks from advanced malware, 67% said the complexity of malware is a chief factor; 67% said the volume of malware attacks; and 58% cited the ineffectiveness of anti-malware solutions.

Submission + - Naval secrets swapped for Lady Gaga tickets .. (huffingtonpost.com)

codeusirae writes: .. prosecutors in court papers say Leonard Francis worked his connections to obtain military secrets by lining up hookers, Lady Gaga tickets and other bribes for a U.S. commander .. Navy commander Michael Vannak Khem Misiewicz passed confidential information on ship routes to Francis' Singapore-based company, Glenn Defense Marine Asia Ltd., or GDMA, according to the court documents ...

Submission + - Pilot blinded at 1000 mph by helmet technical glitch .. (independent.co.uk)

codeusirae writes: RAF pilots were left “blinded” by a barrage of images while flying at speeds of over 1,000 mph when a number of technical glitches hit their high-tech helmets.

The visors were supposed to provide the fighter pilots with complete vision and awareness, but problems with the display produced a blurring known as “green-glow”, meaning they were unable to see clearly.

The green glow occurred when a mass of information was displayed on the helmet-mounted display systems, including radar pictures and images from cameras mounted around the aircraft.

Submission + - Larry Page and Sergey Brin Are Lousy Coders

theodp writes: Don't tell Business Insider's Nicholas Carlson about Santa and the Easter Bunny just yet. He's still reeling after learning that Larry Page and Sergy Brin are actually pretty lousy coders. That's according to I'm Feeling Lucky: The Confessions of Google Employee Number 59, a book about the company's startup days by Douglas Edwards. "I didn't trust Larry and Sergey as coders," Google engineering boss Craig Silverstein recalls in the book. "I had to deal with their legacy code from the Stanford days and it had a lot of problems. They're research coders: more interested in writing code that works than code that's maintainable." But don't cry for Larry and Sergey, Argentina — even if the pair won't be taking home any Top Coder prizes, they can at least take solace in their combined $50+ billion fortune. And, according to Woz, they certainly could have kicked Steve Jobs' butt in a coding contest!

Submission + - Oracle shareholders vote against Ellison's compensation package (again) (techworld.com.au)

angry tapir writes: A majority of Oracle shareholders have once again voted against the company's executive pay practices, including for CEO Larry Ellison. The vote at Oracle's annual shareholder meeting is nonbinding, and follows complaints from some large shareholders and their representatives who say Ellison is overpaid compared to his peers. Ellison is paid US$1 in salary, receiving the rest of his pay in stock options. In Oracle's past fiscal year, that totaled $76.9 million. Shareholders voted against Oracle's executive pay practices at last year's meeting as well.

Submission + - Mike Rogers: "You Can't Have Your Privacy Violated If You Don't Know About It" (techdirt.com) 1

fish waffle writes: Techdirt and Popehat are reporting that during the House Intelligence Committee hearing on NSA surveillance, and in defense of accusations that he had installed a digital camera in the women's bathroom in his office, Intel Committee Chair Rep. Mike Rogers makes the astounding declaration that "You Can't Have Your Privacy Violated If You Don't Know About It."

Submission + - Hackers Break Currency Validator to Pass Any Paper as Valid Euro

Trailrunner7 writes: If espionage is the world’s second-oldest profession, counterfeiting may be in the running to be third on that list. People have been trying to forge currency for just about as long as currency has been circulating, and anti-counterfeiting methods have tried to keep pace with the state of the art. The anti-counterfeiting technology in use today of course relies on computers and software, and like all software, it has bugs, as researchers at IOActive discovered when they reverse-engineered the firmware in a popular Euro currency verifier and found that they could insert their own firmware and force the machine to verify any piece of paper as a valid Euro note.

“The impact is obvious. An attacker with temporary physical access to the device could install customized firmware and cause the device to accept counterfeit money. Taking into account the types of places where these devices are usually deployed (shops, mall, offices, etc.) this scenario is more than feasible.”

Submission + - The Chic-Hide-A Vibe Personal Mini Travel Bullet Vibrator Home Shopping TV Show (youtube.com)

AdamAndEveAsS writes: Item #X892, Chic Hide-A-Vibe ideal travel vibrator. This personal mini bullet toy has a silky-smooth satin finish for easy gliding and twist controls for multi-speed vibrations. Chic Hide-A-Vibe comes with a matching designer case that makes it packing in your luggage safe and discreet.

Get things started anywhere you go with this personal travel vibe only from http://adamandeve.com./ And don’t forget to use the Coupon Code HOME24 at the checkout to enjoy 50% OFF almost ANY item plus FREE Shipping and a FREE His and Hers ROMANCE KIT.

For more details about the offer please click here . http://sextoyshoppingshow.com/offer

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IGvi8nCY7Sw

Submission + - Man arrested over 3D-printed "gun" which is actually spare printer parts (pcpro.co.uk)

nk497 writes: Police in Manchester have arrested a man for 3D printing the components to a gun — but some have suggested the objects actually appear to be spare printer parts. Police arrested a man after a "significant" discovery of a 3D printed "trigger" and "magazine", saying they were now testing the parts to see if they were viable. 3D printing experts, however, said the objects were actually spare parts for the printer.

"As soon as I saw the picture... I instantly thought 'I know that part'," said Scott Crawford, head of 3D printing firm Revolv3D. "They designed an upgrade for the printer soon after it was launched, and most people will have downloaded and upgraded this part within their printer. It basically pulls the plastic filament, and it used to jam an awful lot. The new system that they've put out, which includes that little lever that they're claiming is the trigger, is most definitely the same part."

Submission + - Pissed-off Martha Stewart out to exterminate patent troll Lodsys (gigaom.com)

McGruber writes: Gigaom's Jeff John Roberts reports that Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, Inc. (MSLO) has filed a lawsuit against Lodsys, a shell company that gained infamy two years ago by launching a wave of legal threats (http://paidcontent.org/2011/10/13/419-app-developer-gives-in-to-lodsys-in-david-and-goliath-patent-fight/) against small app makers, demanding they pay for using basic internet technology like in-app purchases or feedback surveys.

In the complaint filed this week in federal court in Wisconsin, Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia asked a judge to declare that four magazine iPad apps are not infringing Lodsys’ patents, and that the patents are invalid because the so-called inventions are not new. The complaint explained how Lodsys invited the company to “take advantage of our program” by buying licenses at $5,000 apiece. It also calls the Wisconsin court’s attention to Lodsys’ involvement in more than 150 Texas lawsuits. In choosing to sue Lodsys and hopefully crush its patents, Martha Stewart is choosing a far more expensive option than simply paying Lodsys to go away.

Submission + - Wozniak expounds on his hacking shenanigans and online mischief (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: In his keynote address at a security conference today, Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak admitted he has enjoyed many adventures in hacking often for the sake of pranks on friends and family, especially back in his college days and the early years of working on computers and the Internet. “I like to play jokes,” said the Wozniak jovially as he addressed his audience of thousands of security professionals attending the ASIS Conference in Chicago. The famed inventor at Apple admitted he also had some fun with light-hearted forays into hacking computer and telecommunications networks several decades ago back in his college years and while learning about electronics and computers.

Submission + - Intense Fans Of TV Shows Make Better Spam Targets (itworld.com)

jfruh writes: One the latest spam trends is the so-called "watering hole attack," in which users are tempted to jump through some hoops (clicking on affiliate links and downloading adware in the process) with the false promise of a leaked episode of a popular TV show. What's interesting is that these attacks don't use as bait CBS's "NCIS," by far the most popular TV show in the country; instead, they focus on shows with smaller but more intense fan bases, like "Breaking Bad," which offers some insight into the psychology of how these attacks work.

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