Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×
IOS

Submission + - Gosling: New Java Proposal Could Ease Ports To iOS (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Java founder James Gosling sees promise in JNI, which modifies standard Java to package runtime, as well as native and Java application code on iOS devices, InfoWorld reports. 'Java has been on iOS for quite a while' via Oracle ADF Mobile, Gosling notes. 'The catch is that to deal with an arcane nit in the Apple terms of service, the JIT code generator has to be turned off. I'm not at Oracle, and I'm not involved, but I'd be willing to wager that JEP 178 can be used as a part of complying with the Apple TOS (terms of service) without turning off code generation.'"
Java

Submission + - Apple Hit By Hackers Who Targeted Facebook (reuters.com)

snydeq writes: "Apple was recently attacked by hackers who infected the Macintosh computers of some employees, the company said on Tuesday in an unprecedented disclosure that described the widest known cyber attacks against Apple-made computers to date, Reuters reports. 'The same software, which infected Macs by exploiting a flaw in a version of Oracle Corp's Java software used as a plug-in on Web browsers, was used to launch attacks against Facebook, which the social network disclosed on Friday. ... A person briefed on the investigation into the attacks said that hundreds of companies, including defense contractors, had been infected with the same malicious software, or malware. The attacks mark the highest-profile cyber attacks to date on businesses running Mac computers.'"
Cloud

Submission + - Which PaaS Is Best For Legacy Java Apps? (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Andrew C. Oliver and Lifford Pinto detail the ups, downs, ins, and outs of deploying a legacy Java application to 7 leading platform-as-a-service clouds, including Amazon Elastic Beanstalk, CloudBees, Google App Engine, Heroku, Microsoft Azure, Red Hat OpenShift, and VMware Cloud Foundry. The writeup includes a look at key differentiating features, lock-in, security, and the kinds of companies using each PaaS. 'It's still a bit early in the PaaS space, but you can already begin porting legacy apps to some cloud platforms with only minor changes or possibly none at all. Big companies and small companies alike may find a PaaS to be a compelling way to deploy applications and cut capital expenditures. This market isn't as crowded as it might seem, as many of the big players aren't yet out of beta. But in the coming months we can expect that to change.'"
Java

Submission + - Security Pros Advise Users To Ditch Java (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "The 'write once, run anywhere' software platform has become a favorite of cyber attackers. Is it time for users to kill their Java? Security firms think so. None too gentle with Oracle's Java following the revelation this week that attackers are using two Java vulnerabilities to compromise selected targets, security pros are advising users to uninstall the Java plug-in in your browser and don't use services that require the software."
Java

Submission + - Why You Can't Dump Java (Even Though You Want To) (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "So many recent exploits have used Java as their attack vector, you might conclude Java should be shown the exit, but the reality is, Java is not the problem, writes Security Advisor's Roger Grimes. 'Sure, I could opt not to use those Java-enabled services or install Java and uninstall when I'm finished. But the core problem isn't necessarily Java's exploitability; nearly all software is exploitable. It's unpatched Java. Few successful Java-related attacks are related to zero-day exploits. Almost all are related to Java security bugs that have been patched for months (or longer),' Grimes writes. 'The bottom line is that we aren't addressing the real problems. It isn't a security bug here and there in a particular piece of software; that's a problem we'll never get rid of. Instead, we allow almost all cyber criminals to get away with their Internet crime without any penalty. They almost never get caught and punished. Until we solve the problem of accountability, we will never get rid of the underlying problem.'"
Java

Submission + - Oracle vs. Google: Who Owns The Java APIs? (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Fatal Exception's Neil McAllister sees Oracle's suit against Google boiling down to calling dibs on the Java APIs, and if the court agrees, this will be bad news for developers everywhere. 'Oracle's argument is roughly akin to me claiming that because I own the copyright to a book of commonly used English phrases, publishers of Shakespeare need to pay me royalties. If it holds true for Java, it will hold true for any programming language, from any source. That could radically change the relationship between developers and platform vendors,' McAllister writes. 'For one thing, it raises questions about programming language licensing. If the most basic language APIs can be copyrighted, would that not in effect make any program written in any language a derivative work of that language's APIs? How would that work in practice? Who would developers have to pay? What rights would they have to sign away?'"
Java

Submission + - Oracle: Google Knowingly 'Broke The Rules' With Java (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Oracle and Google kicked off a high-stakes jury trial in San Francisco on Monday, with Oracle arguing that Google ran roughshod over its intellectual property rights because the search giant was scared of getting left behind in the mobile advertising business. "This case is about Google's use, in Google's business, of somebody else's property without permission," said Michael Jacobs, an attorney for Oracle, in his opening remarks to the jury. Jacobs cited several emails to and from Google executives that he said would show that Google knew it needed a license for Java and that, having failed to negotiate one, it developed Android with Java anyway."
Java

Submission + - Last Call For Client-Side Java (infoworld.com) 1

snydeq writes: "As browser makers move to block vulnerable plug-ins, Java's future as a client-side platform is uncertain, writes Fatal Exception's Neil McAllister. 'Java developers hate to hear that their language of choice is becoming the new Cobol, but it already resembles that venerable language in at least one respect: Java is used far more often on the server side than on the client. That trend only seems to be increasing. Case in point: The Mozilla Foundation announced this week that it's blocking certain versions of the Java plug-in from running in its Firefox browser. However, Firefox isn't alone in squeezing Java out of the browser; the Metro-style version of Internet Explorer 10 won't support plug-ins at all, Java included.'"
Java

Submission + - Oracle's Latest Java Moves Draw Industry Ire (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Two years hence, Oracle's stewardship of Java continues to raise user and vendor ire, this time due to modularization, licensing, and security concerns. 'Plans for version 8 of Java Platform Standard Edition, which is due next year, call for inclusion of Project Jigsaw to add modular capabilities to Java. But some organizations are concerned with how Oracle's plans might conflict with the OSGi module system already geared to Java. In the licensing arena, Canonical, the maker of Ubuntu Linux, says Oracle is no longer letting Linux distributors redistribute Oracle's own commercial Java, causing difficulties for the company. Meanwhile, security vendor F-Secure views Java as security hindrance.'"
Java

Submission + - Oracle's Ambitious Plan For Client-Side Java (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Fatal Exception's Neil McAllister suggests that the real news out of this year's JavaOne is Oracle's ambitious plan to revitalize Java on the desktop, the Web, and mobile devices. 'It's been tempting to assume that Oracle, with its strong enterprise focus, would ignore the client in favor of data center technologies such as Java EE. This week, we learned that's not the case. In fact, the real news from this year's JavaOne conference in San Francisco may not be Oracle's plans for Java 8 and 9, but the revelation that Oracle is gearing up for a new, sustained push behind Java for the desktop, the Web, and mobile devices. If it can succeed in its ambitious plans, the age of client-side Java could be just beginning.'"
IOS

Submission + - Oracle Demos JavaFX On iOS And Android (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Oracle demonstrated JavaFX on iOS and Android, and introduced a separate project using HTML5 to bring Java to Apple's iOS platform, called Project Avatar, InfoWorld reports. Java has thus far been barred from Apple's iOS devices, thanks to Apple's official policy not allowing third-party technologies on the units. But a brief demonstration showed a JavaFX game running on an iPad. 'This effort effectively puts Java on iOS but is still in a developmental mode.'"
Java

Submission + - Java Cloud Platforms Compared (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "InfoWorld's Peter Wayner provides an in-depth comparison of four Java cloud platforms, putting CloudBees, Google App Engine, Red Hat OpenShift, and VMware Cloud Foundry through their paces to 'reveal the pleasures and perils of coding on a public cloud platform.' 'The danger of lock-in seems to lurk around every corner, and that's not necessarily the worst part. What if we're happy with everything about our cloud except we need one missing feature that the cloud's masters either can't or don't want to deliver?' Wayner writes. 'Some of the clouds rely upon standard tools that take standard WAR files and deliver their information to the world. Others have so many proprietary twists that you might as well tattoo the code on your arm — it's going to be with you for the rest of your life.'"
Java

Submission + - Oracle: Java's Worst Enemy (infoworld.com) 1

snydeq writes: "Fatal Exception's Neil McAllister sees Oracle's buggy Java SE 7 release as only the latest misstep in a mounting litany of bad behavior. 'Oracle shipped Java SE 7 with a serious, showstopping bug, and who was the first to alert the Java community? The Apache Foundation. Oh, the irony. This is the same Apache Foundation that resigned from the Java Community Process executive committee in protest after Oracle repeatedly refused to give it access to the Java Technology Compatibility Kit,' McAllister writes. 'It seems as if Oracle would like nothing better than to stomp Apache and its open source Java efforts clean out of existence. And that's a shame, because at this point, Apache is doing a lot more good for the Java community than Oracle is. If I made my living as a Java developer, I would be pounding the walls right now. Oracle should be ashamed of itself. It's almost as if it doesn't care about its customers at all — ah, but what am I saying?'"
Google

Submission + - What to Expect From Gosling at Google (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Fatal Exception's Neil McAllister discusses what the Java community might expect from Gosling at Google, given Google's wide array of Java projects in the works, and the fact that Google and Gosling don't always see eye to eye. 'Should we expect big things from Gosling once he settles in at Google? It depends on what you mean. Anyone who expects Gosling to wield the might of Google to strike back against Oracle's dominance over the Java ecosystem is likely to be disappointed. On the other hand, if this move marks the beginning of a fulfilling, productive new chapter in Gosling's career — whether it's in the public eye or behind the scenes — it's sure to be a net win for everybody.'"

Slashdot Top Deals

Real wealth can only increase. -- R. Buckminster Fuller

Working...