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Cloud

Submission + - Office 2013: Microsoft Cloud Era Begins In Earnest (businessweek.com)

snydeq writes: "Microsoft's release of Office 2013 represents the latest in a series of makeover moves, this time aimed at shifting use of its bedrock productivity suite to the cloud. Early hands-on testing suggests Office 2013 is the 'best Office yet,' bringing excellent cloud features and pay-as-you-go pricing to Office. But Microsoft's new vision for remaining nimble in the cloud era comes with some questions, such as what happens when your subscription expires, not to mention some gray areas around inevitable employee use of Office 2013 Home Premium in business settings."
Cloud

Submission + - Which PaaS Is Best For Legacy Java Apps? (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Andrew C. Oliver and Lifford Pinto detail the ups, downs, ins, and outs of deploying a legacy Java application to 7 leading platform-as-a-service clouds, including Amazon Elastic Beanstalk, CloudBees, Google App Engine, Heroku, Microsoft Azure, Red Hat OpenShift, and VMware Cloud Foundry. The writeup includes a look at key differentiating features, lock-in, security, and the kinds of companies using each PaaS. 'It's still a bit early in the PaaS space, but you can already begin porting legacy apps to some cloud platforms with only minor changes or possibly none at all. Big companies and small companies alike may find a PaaS to be a compelling way to deploy applications and cut capital expenditures. This market isn't as crowded as it might seem, as many of the big players aren't yet out of beta. But in the coming months we can expect that to change.'"
Cloud

Submission + - Why Oracle's Cloud Service Will Fail (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Oracle is jumping in as a public IaaS provider, which means another large company is taking a swing at Amazon Web Services, writes Cloud Computing's David Linthicum. 'Like their counterparts at Hewlett-Packard, Oracle execs believe that just saying they'll be able to take over a market will make it so. It won't, and I suspect that even tried-and-true Oracle shops will push back on this offering. In my days as a CTO at big technology companies, I entered markets defined and dominated by other tech providers. I quickly discovered that I needed to find another way in; simply replicating their technology didn't work as a strategy. Oracle has not learned that lesson. Perhaps it believes its large user base will accept Oracle's pronouncements without thought. If so, the tech industry is littered with failures based on that assumption.'"
Cloud

Submission + - The Cloud Is Hiring (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "IT is moving to the cloud — and so are the jobs, InfoWorld reports. 'In the last eight months or so, "the light has gone on in the heads of CIOs and CEOs, and a gap between supply [of IT personnel with skills for the cloud] and demand has opened up," says David Foote, whose consultancy, Foote Partners, keeps close track of IT compensation, certifications, and employment. Although salaries aren't spiking at the pace of the old dot-com days, times are good for those with the right skills and the flexibility to learn how to develop, deploy, and manage applications and services in the cloud. Foote's observation regarding the limited supply of top-flight engineers and developers to work on cloud-related projects is borne out by interviews with six of the leading public cloud providers. All are hiring rapidly; all say talent is now at a premium.'"
Cloud

Submission + - VMware To Virtualize Entire Datacenter With vCloud Suite 5.1 (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "VMware's just announced vCloud Suite 5.1 is being viewed as an 'aggressive bid to rule the emerging software-definted data center (SDDC),' by extending virtualization beyond servers and storage to the network itself. 'vCloud Suite 5.1 adds some compelling features to help organizations realize the SDDC vision of a fully abstracted data center that doesn't care about the physical location of servers, storage gear, or networking hardware,' InfoWorld reports. 'Among vCloud Suite's most interesting features is its virtual networking capabilities (via vSphere 5.1), which represent a potentially disruptive game-changer for network admins.'"
Cloud

Submission + - Review: Google Compute Engine (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "InfoWorld's Peter Wayner takes an in-depth look at Google Compute Engine, the search giant's response to Amazon Web Services and Rackspace. 'If you want to build your own collection of Linux boxes, Google Compute Engine offers a nice, generic way to buy servers at what — depending on the size of compute instance you need — can be a great price. The most attractive feature will probably be the proximity to the other parts of the Google infrastructure,' Wayner writes, adding that Google Compute Engine is just one part of the Google APIs portal, a grand collection of 46 services. 'I suspect many developers will be most interested in using Google Compute Engine when they want to poll these Google databases fairly often. While I don't think you're guaranteed to be in the same zone as the service you want, you're still closer than when traveling across the generic Web.'"
Cloud

Submission + - How To Choose An IaaS Provider (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Amazon's cloud has become an extension of many organizations' infrastructure, often for application development and testing, but also for compute-intensive analytics and even ongoing production workloads. But in the past two months, three giants have lumbered into the game: HP, Microsoft, and Google. InfoWorld offers a look at the new IaaS cloudscape — and a little about how to choose among the various platforms."
Cloud

Submission + - Compute Engine: What Took Google So Long? (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Four years after the launch of App Engine, Google has finally decided to get in the public cloud IaaS game — currently dominated by Amazon — in the form of Compute Engine. So what took them so long? To hear Google Compute Engine product manager Craig McLuckie tell it, it's all about crafting a service Google can be proud of. But the truth may be closer to Google engineer Steve Yegge's accidental rant that Google 'doesn't get platforms.' Couple that with Google's track record for service and support on the paid version of Google Apps, and you can see the nirvana of Google Compute Engine taking longer than most might otherwise hope."
Cloud

Submission + - Hands-On Insights Into Google Compute Engine (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Yesterday's Compute Engine announcement at Google I/O made it clear that Google intends to take Amazon EC2 head on. Michael Crandell, who has been testing out Compute Engine for some time now, divulges deeper insights into the nascent IaaS, which, although enticing, will have a long road ahead of it in eclipsing Amazon EC2. 'Even in this early stage, three major factors about Google Cloud stood out for Crandell. First was the way Google leveraged the use of its own private network to make its cloud resources uniformly accessible across the globe. ... Another key difference was boot times, which are both fast and consistent in Google's cloud. ... Third is encryption. Google offers at-rest encryption for all storage, whether it's local or attached over a network. "Everything's automatically encrypted," says Crandell, "and it's encrypted outside the processing of the VM so there's no degradation of performance to get that feature."'"
Cloud

Submission + - Adopt The Cloud, Kill Your IT Career (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "IT professionals jumping into the cloud with both feet beware: It's irresponsible to think that just because you push a problem outside your office, it ceases to be your problem. ''t's not just the possibility of empty promises and integration issues that dog the cloud decision; it's also the upgrade to the new devil, the one you don't know. You might be eager to relinquish responsibility of a cranky infrastructure component and push the headaches to a cloud vendor, but in reality you aren't doing that at all. Instead, you're adding another avenue for the blame to follow. The end result of a catastrophic failure or data loss event is exactly the same whether you own the service or contract it out.'"
Cloud

Submission + - Is OpenStack The New Linux? (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "As the self-proclaimed 'cloud OS for the datacenter,' OpenStack is fast becoming one of the more intriguing movements in open source — complete with lofty ambitions, community in-fighting, and commercial appeal. But questions remain whether this project can reach its potential of becoming the new Linux. 'The allure of OpenStack is clear: Like Linux, OpenStack aims to provide a kernel around which all kinds of software vendors can build businesses. But with OpenStack, we're talking multiple projects to provide agile cloud management of compute, storage, and networking resources across the data center — plus authentication, self-service, resource monitoring, and a slew of other projects. It's hugely ambitious, perhaps the most far-reaching open source project ever, although still at a very early stage. ... Clearly, the sky-high aspirations of OpenStack both fuel its outrageous momentum and incur the risk of overreach and collapse, as it incites all manner of competition. The promise is big, but the success of OpenStack is by no means assured.'"
Cloud

Submission + - Why Corporate Cloud Storage Doesn't Add Up (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Deep End's Paul Venezia sees few business IT situations that could make good use of full cloud storage services, outside of startups. 'As IT continues in a zigzag path of figuring out what to do with this "cloud" stuff, it seems that some companies are getting ahead of themselves. In particular, the concept of outsourcing storage to a cloud provider puzzles me. I can see some benefits in other cloud services (though I still find the trust aspect difficult to reconcile), but full-on cloud storage offerings don't make sense outside of some rare circumstances.'"
Cloud

Submission + - IT Jobs: Winners And Losers In The Cloud (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "InfoWorld's Kevin Fogarty takes a look at how the rise of cloud computing will impact IT jobs, outlining which roles stand to gain prominence in the years to come, and which roles will suffer as organizations extend their commitments to the cloud. 'Ultimately the bulk of IT could look more like a projects office than the way it looks now, when most of the hands-on work is done inside. It probably won't be a total transformation, but moving into cloud, there will be more of that and less DIY.'"

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