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Submission + - How secure is Android? Google wants the world to know within 2 decimal points (fastcompany.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Google just released its 2014 Android Security Year in Review, an intensely data-driven report intended to bring transparency to the vulnerability of phones running on Android. Its findings: fewer than 0.15% of devices that only install from Google Play had a Potentially Harmful App (PHA)—apps that pose a threat to users or their data— installed. Overall, fewer than 1% of Android devices had a PHA installed in 2014. Apple, Microsoft, and Blackberry haven’t released similar figures.

Submission + - Facebook launches open-source JavaScript library to speed mobile development (networkworld.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Facebook released React-Native, a cross-platform JavaScript library that accelerates app development for iOS and Android. Facebook runs much of its operations on open-source software, and is taking another stab at the inefficiencies of building separate native mobile apps for iOS and Android platforms with a new open-source project. It builds on the success of the React, the company's three-year-old open-source web user interface (UI) library.

Submission + - Verizon would let the US internet come in second to Bulgaria (networkworld.com)

smaxp writes: Without net neutrality, ISPs would destroy U.S. broadband speeds

Verizon argued for a slower internet, slower than most internet connections in Bulgaria in its Federal law suit against the Federal Communications Commission and net neutrality. In arguing for a snail slow internet Verizon challenged the very powers that underlie the draft net neutrality rules the FCC released last week for public comment.

Submission + - MIT students to receive $100 in Bitcoin (networkworld.com)

colinneagle writes: The MIT Bitcoin Club is handing out $100 in the cryptocurrenty to MIT undergrads next September. The club’s co-founder Jeremy Rubin gave a pretty convincing reason for the giveaway:

"Giving students access to cryptocurrencies is analogous to providing them with internet access at the dawn of the internet era."

That gets at the main point, which is to encourage the students to test the technology and come up with applications for it. Even with the Mt. Gox debacle and the other issues surrounding Bitcoin's stability and value, its potential as a technological platform remains massive.

Submission + - China has a market to accommodate Apple's 4G iPad (networkworld.com)

smaxp writes: In China, Apple's premium brand strategy is targeted at the same wealthy buyers of Este Lauder cosmetics, BMW cars and Burberry clothing.

The least-expensive iPad mini announced yesterday is more than a quarter of this average Chinese family annual income.

But in the big, wealthy cities, Apple will compete very effectively. Apple accounts for just 7% of market share in China, as reported by IDC, but in the other China, the big cities, its market share is closer to 30%.

Submission + - China has a market to accommodate Apple's 4G iPad (networkworld.com)

Steve Patterson writes: The average family income in China is about $2,100 per year, according to a New York Times report. The least-expensive iPad mini announced yesterday for the market in China is more than a quarter of this average family income.

In China, Apple's premium brand strategy is targeted at the same wealthy buyers of Este Lauder cosmetics, BMW cars and Burberry clothing. In the big, wealthy cities, Apple still can compete very effectively with cheaper Android. Apple accounts for just 7% of market share in China, as reported by IDC, but in the other China, the big wealth cities, its market share is closer to 30%.

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