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Comment Re:I use them all the time (Score 1) 264

>learn a song from Youtube

This is one of the better functions of Youtube. Learning a chord progression by repeatedly playing a CD or looping part of a music file isn't as easy as actually /watching/ it.

Some artists deliberately put videos out there for people to learn to play, like Dr. John.

Another value of Youtube, musically, is that there is a ton of historically significant music on it. Betty Boop cartoons with Cab Calloway music, anybody?

--
BMO

Space

SpaceX Shows Off Its Interplanetary Transport System in New Video (techcrunch.com) 150

Elon Musk's SpaceX plans to send humans to Mars with a ship called the Interplanetary Transport System, the company announced today in a video, revealing how the ITS will actually work. The ITS will be capable of carrying up to 100 tons of cargo -- people and supplies -- and it will utilize a slew of different power sources en route to Mars. From a report on TechCrunch: SpaceX has released a new video showing a CG concept of its Interplanetary Transport System, the rocket and spacecraft combo it plans to use to colonize Mars. The video depicts a reusable rocket that can get the interplanetary spacecraft beyond Earth's orbit, and a craft that uses solar sails to coast on its way to a Mars entry. The booster returns to Earth after separating from the shuttlecraft to pick up a booster tank full of fuel, which it then returns to orbit to fuel up the waiting spaceship. The booster craft then also returns to Earth under its own power, presumably also for re-use. The solar arrays that the spacecraft employs provide 200 kW of power, according to captions in the video.The Verge is live blogging SpaceX's conference, and has details on specs.

Comment Re: LMFTFY (Score 1) 133

Muller has had computers he could fly since 1980.

Even the low powered mobile/embedded computers we had from ten years ago were not really fast enough to incorporate a lot of sensor data and perform extensive autonomous functions. We aren't talking about the small rack of computers you could put on a jumbo jet, or even in a car, or the small embedded computers you would put on a missile that could incorporate one sensor or two with simple instructions. What we have now is a capability to have small embedded or low power computers that can have millions of lines of code and do much more of the real time sensor processing needed to keep a small uav or small VTOL stable during dynamic near ground and cross wind conditions. And we also have an open source software community around autonomous drones and robotics that could be leveraged for control systems for small VTOL.

Space

SpaceX Tests Its Raptor Engine For Future Mars Flights (techcrunch.com) 109

Thelasko writes: Elon Musk is preparing to unveil his plans to colonize Mars at the 67th annual International Astronautical Congress tomorrow. As a tease to his lecture, he has released some details about the Raptor engine on Twitter, including pictures. Mr. Musk states that, "Production Raptor coal is specific impulse of 382 seconds and thrust of 3 MN (~310 metric tons) at 300 bar." He goes on to note that the specific impulse spec is at Mars ambient pressure. The Raptor interplanetary engine is designed for use with Space X's Mars Colonial Transporter craft. Musk notes that the "chamber pressure runs three times what's present in the Merlin engine currently used to power Falcon 9," according to TechCrunch. "Merlin has specific impulse of 282 seconds (311 seconds in the vacuum of space), and a relatively paltry 654 kilonewton (0.6 MN) at sea level, or 716 kN (0.7 MN) in a vacuum. You can view a picture of the "Mach diamonds" here, which are visible in the engine's exhaust.

Comment And the fucked up part (Score 1) 210

If you actually go shopping, you'll usually find that the same sized packages cost the same amount.

Whether buying regular Oreos, Double Stuff, Double Triples, whatever. You just wind up with fewer individual cookies per-pack.

So. What does this teach us?

That, you get a set commodity at a set price REGARDLESS of how you use it.

Comment Re:Reduced OS for short term gains. (Score 1) 55

In Android at least, only one application can be running at the same time (no background processing unless you program a service for your app)

Bollocks.

And the rest of what you say has nothing to do with Android or ChromeOS. You can have access to root in both. Android devices generally have it disabled but it can be enabled - of course, even CyanogenMod discourages root access these days, as it shouldn't be necessary. ChromeOS? Off by default, but every ChromeBook let's you reconfigure ChromeOS to allow root if you desperately want it. As for "Spyware", it's entirely up to you whether you use Google's services or not.

And none of your objections have anything to do with the original point. You're complaining about the UI disabling certain features. The underlying operating system has those features. And, frankly, easy access to root was something that Windows 95 gave you by default that NT made a little harder to get...

Comment Re:LMFTFY (Score 1) 133

Just as soon as the Moller Skycar is ready. It'll be real soon now, right? He's only been working on it for about 50 years.

Moller ran up against the problem of not wanting to get test pilots killed, and the FAA not wanting to get test pilots killed... but strap in a lightweight laptop that can autonomously stabilize the vehicle during testing while you have a pilot on the ground directing it where to go and you should be able to make faster progress than Moller ever could with periodic tethered flights from a crane and a human test pilot.

Comment Re:The poor economics of flying cars (Score 1) 133

The biggest mistake people make, is thinking, if technology X was tested and it failed. that in 50 years with new technology and materials it will still fail.

The problem with making a flying car isn't really the technology. We've known how to make a VTOL aircraft for a long time now. The showstopper is the economics of it.

Yes, it is the technology... new technology is what makes the economics work or not work. Successful new technology has always been about making the economics work. Lighter stronger materials..... lighter more powerful engines and motors, denser energy storage in batteries, along with lighter more powerful and more energy efficient computers necessary for controlling all those systems in a more dynamic vertical take off flight mode. I am not saying the economics will work, or that it could be made affordable for large numbers of people, but it is certainly a lot closer to working than it was ten or twenty years ago.

And even if the economics only work for the wealthy, then that still could mean a better overall transportation system with less pressure on existing infrastructure if we take some people off the roads.

Certainly worth some speculative R&D and it is worth support from NASA and regulatory support from the FAA.

Comment Re:Crucial question (Score 2) 55

What's interesting about it? Netbook/Tablet hybrids are widely available already! Most of them come with Windows 10, but you can install anything you like on them.

But, FWIW, Chromebooks generally have a feature, sometimes implemented in hardware, sometimes in software, that disables the TPM module so you can either access the operating system as a developer, or wipe the OS completely and put on a more usual desktop system.

Comment Re:Reduced OS for short term gains. (Score 1) 55

I'm not sure if you're aware of this, but both Android and ChromeOS (presumably meaning the OS under discussion here too) are full blown modern operating systems with networking, permissions, memory protection, etc. They are both on a par with Unix in terms of features. They both, however, have user interfaces that block user access to certain features of the operating system.

This is nothing like the jump from 95 to NT.

Comment Re:And IMDB cares about this *why*, exactly? (Score 1) 300

No reason those jobs have be in Santa Monica though. Or anywhere else in CA. Move them to Seattle like the rest of the company.

Maybe this Google query will give you a hint as to why they have an office in Santa Monica.

Hint: It isn't because top networking specialists and PHP programmers are best found in Los Angeles.

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