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Google

Submission + - Lawmakers ask for FTC investigation of Google Buzz (goodgearguide.com.au) 2

angry tapir writes: "Eleven U.S. lawmakers have asked the U.S. Federal Trade Commission to investigate Google's launch of its Buzz social-networking product for breaches of consumer privacy. The representatives — six Democrats and five Republicans from the House Energy and Commerce Committee — noted in their letter that Google's roll-out of Buzz exposed private information of users to Google's Gmail service to outsiders. In one case, a 9-year-old girl accidentally shared her contact list in Gmail with a person who has a "sexually charged" username, the lawmakers said in the letter."

Submission + - FCC begins crafting net neutrality regulations (nytimes.com)

ceswiedler writes: "The FCC has begun crafting rules for network neutrality. The full proposal hasn't been released yet, but according to their press release (warning, Microsoft Word document) carriers would not be allowed to "prevent users from sending or receiving the lawful content", "running lawful applications", or "connecting and using...lawful devices that do not harm the network". There will be a three-month period for comments, beginning January 14, after which the FCC will issue its final guidelines."
Transportation

Submission + - @sshole Drivers Reduce Traffic Jams (physicscentral.com) 3

BuzzSkyline writes: "Traffic jams are minimized if a significant fraction of drivers break the rules by doing things like passing on the wrong side or changing lanes too close to an intersection. The insight comes from a cellular automata study published this month in the journal Physical Review E. In effect, people who disregard the rules help to break up the groups that form as rule-followers clump together. The risk of jamming is lower if all people obey the rules than if they all disobey them, according to the analysis, but jamming risk is lowest when about 40 percent of people drive like jerks."

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