Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Get HideMyAss! VPN, PC Mag's Top 10 VPNs of 2016 for 55% off for a Limited Time ×
Google

Submission + - Google pledges not to sue open source software, unless first attacked (muktware.com)

sfcrazy writes: Google has announced the Open Patent Non-Assertion (OPN) Pledge. In it's pledge Google says that they will not sue any user, distributor or developer of open-source software on specified patents, unless first attacked. Under this pledge, Google is starting off with 10 patents relating to MapReduce, a computing model for processing large data sets first developed at Google. Google says that over time they intend to expand the set of Google’s patents covered by the pledge to other technologies.
DRM

Submission + - Google brings HTML5 DRM to all Chrome OS devices (muktware.com)

sfcrazy writes: Google updated the dev channel of Chrome OS to version 27.0.1438.8 for all Chrome OS devices. This update brings HTML5 DRM, which Google calls, 'Widevine Content Decryption Module' to all Chrome Devices (not only ARM). It's a module which 'enables Widevine licenses for playback of HTML audio/video content. The new HTML5 Encrypted Media Extensions aka EME (a set of APIs designed to control playback of protected content) made this possible.
DRM

Submission + - Netflix streamed over HTML5 for ARM Chromebook, end of silverlight? (muktware.com)

sfcrazy writes: Netflix has pushed an update today to its Chrome Store app which brings support for the ARM-based Samsung Chromebook. This is a major change as instead of using Microsoft's Silverlight Netflix is using HTML5 video streaming (which now supports DRM for HTML5 on Chromebooks). Recently Google enabled the much controversial DRM support for HTML5 in Chrome OS to bring services like Netflix to Chromebooks using HTML5 instead of controversial Silverlight of Microsoft.
Google

Submission + - Linus Torvalds Praises Chrome Pixel (muktware.com)

sfcrazy writes: Linus Torvalds loves his Macbook Air, but that's going to change. The creator of Linux is in love with Google's Chrome Pixel and he is even considering making it his primary laptop. He writes on his Google + page - "Hey, I've joined all the cool kids in having one of the new Google "Pixel" laptops (aka Chromebooks). And it is a beautiful screen, to the point where I suspect I'll make this my primary laptop. I tend to like my laptops slightly smaller, but I think I can lug around this 1.5kg monster despite feeling fairly strongly that a laptop should weigh 1kg or less."
Android

Submission + - Should Google Be Worried About Samsung's Dominance? (muktware.com)

sfcrazy writes: Samsung has becoming *the* face of Android as the general people see. The company has paid heavily for it — they push great hardware (not it design, but at least in display), they innovated on UI (for bad or worse) and introduced multi-windowed apps and also fought Apple's expensive court battle — which gave them even more publicity. All of it is good but troubling as well because the company may shed Google's luggage and go Amazon route to create it's own Android. Or they may push Google to renegotiate the deal. The competitor are very very far — what should Google do to keep a check on Samsung? Or should it be worried?
Chrome

Submission + - Google Cripples HTML5 With DRM On Chrome OS (muktware.com)

sfcrazy writes: Google has implemented DRM in its Chrome OS with support for WebM. Google pushed an updated for the stable channel of Chrome OS bringing it up to the version 25.0.1364.87 for Samsung Chromebooks. One of the most notable 'features' of this update is HTML5 on Chrome OS has been restricted with DRM. The changelog states: HTML5 Content Decryption Module (CDM) with WebM support.
Google

Submission + - Google Introduces New Web Protocol QUIC To Make The Web Faster (muktware.com)

sfcrazy writes: In order to make 'web' faster, Google has been secretly working on a new web protocol called QUIC. The company has released the source code for Chromium implementation of Quic on their website. But it has also started a debate whether this is the right way to introduce a protocal. Jan Wildeboer of Red Hat has says, "Google trying to introduce yet another proprietary protocol instead of open standards? And even if the implementation is open source, the specification is vendor driven, not an open standard AFAICS. IMHO this is not acceptable." But Simon Phipps, the president and director of Open Source Initiative tends to disagree with Wildeboer and says, "On the contrary, +Jan Wildeboer, this is exactly how standards should work; with a strong working example and open source code. As long as Google bow to consensus when the standards discussion occurs, what we will see is working ideas perfected and then mature consensus standardised."
Google

Submission + - Google's Touch-based Pixel Chromebook May Be Real (muktware.com)

sfcrazy writes: There was quite a lot of Hollywoodish (sans MPAA) drama around a 'secret' Google project called Chromebook Pixel. Some videos were leaked and the company in question said that their servers were hijaked. No one confirmed or rejected the story. Some called it a hoax. I think the device is in the making and I have some reasons to believe so. François Beaufort, who also shared the story about Chromebook Pixel on his Google+ has dropped another hint on 'touch friendly' new icons for Chromium.
Google

Submission + - Linux & Open Source Dominate North Korea? (muktware.com)

sfcrazy writes: Google's Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt was visiting the secretive country North Korea. In his Google+ post he wrote that "They [North Koreans] also demonstrated their software and technology based on open source (mostly Linux) and it was obvious to us that access to the Internet and all of this was possible for the government, the military, and universities, but not for the general public."
Android

Submission + - Nexus Q No Longer Available For Sale (muktware.com)

sfcrazy writes: Nexus Q, the social media streaming holo-themed ball from Google has finished its life after only 8 months since it was announced in June 2012 after an interesting rumour buildup. Its status on Google Play has changed from "not for sale at this time" to "no longer available for sale", marking the somewhat expected end of this device.

Slashdot Top Deals

Real Users are afraid they'll break the machine -- but they're never afraid to break your face.

Working...