Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Get HideMyAss! VPN, PC Mag's Top 10 VPNs of 2016 for 55% off for a Limited Time ×

Comment Re: Wireless charging is probably dangerous (Score 4, Informative) 169

Not MRIs. When I did a paediatric anaesthesia fellowship we would routinely sit in the room for the scan. Think cardiac MRIs requiring breath holds. The techs sit outside the room cause they need to use computers to run the scanner and also it's really (unpleasantly Even with quality ear protection) noisy. Plus something about pressure in the room that I never understood.

Submission + - Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster now can perform marriages in New Zealand (stuff.co.nz)

scrote-ma-hote writes: From stuff.co.nz, news come in that the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster is now able to solemnise marriages. The registration was listed in the NZ gazette yesterday. The Registrar-General decided that the Church met the criteria in New Zealand for solemnising marriages, as per the Marriage Act 1955, namely that the "principal object of the organisation was to uphold or promote religious beliefs, philosophical or humanitarian convictions."

Submission + - The software behind the Large Hadron Collider and the Higgs Boson (talkpython.fm)

mikeckennedy writes: The largest machine ever built is the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It's primary goal was the discovery of the Higgs Boson: the fundamental particle which gives all objects mass. The LHC team of 1000's of physicists achieved that goal in 2012 winning the Nobel Prize in physics. Kyle Cranmer is here to share how Python was at the core of this amazing achievement!

You'll learn about the different experiment including ATLAST and CMS. We talk a bit about the physics involved in the discovery before digging into the software and computer technology used at CERN. The collisions generate a tremendous amount of data and the technology to filter, gather, and understand the data is super interesting.

Comment Re:Not completely bogus (Score 3, Informative) 182

Chemo operates on the fact that we know that cancer is caused by malignant white cells, so what do we do? We nuke all your white cells.

WTF are you talking about? Only a small subset of cancers (known as haematological) cancers are caused by malignant white cells. These are leukaemias and lymphomas. Other cancers are caused by other cells, e.g. carcinomas (epithelial cells), adenocarcinoma (glandular cells), sarcomas (connective tissue cells) etc.

In general, chemotherapy operates on the fact that cancer is caused by rapidly-dividing, malignant cells. Primarily, chemotherapeutic drugs affect the ability of the body to create new cells, often by disrupting DNA synthesis. This means that all cells, especially cancer cells are less able to divide and grow. This is why your hair falls out, you get mucositis etc etc. These are also rapidly turning over cells.

I'm not an oncologist (but I am a doctor, and you'll notice from my spelling that I don't live in the US), so can't quote improvement in survival, but when you base most of your statement around a misleading premise, it makes the rest of your argument look pretty shoddy.

Comment Re:And In Related News: (Score 0, Troll) 584

So it's OK for him to expose second hand smoke and all the toxins that go with it to anyone else who has to drive his truck? Or the mechanic who has to fix his truck? Those toxins don't just fly out the window you know. It *is* a workplace. Other people are required to interact with his workplace as part of their jobs. The intention of the law is to protect other people in their workplaces from the damaging effects of tobacco smoke. Fining people for smoking in their trucks helps to achieve this.

Slashdot Top Deals

"Necessity is the mother of invention" is a silly proverb. "Necessity is the mother of futile dodges" is much nearer the truth. -- Alfred North Whitehead

Working...