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Submission + - Sharing HBO Go Accounts Could Result In Prison (ibtimes.com) 2

coolnumbr12 writes: In a recent New York Times article called “No TV? No Subscription? No Problem?” Jenna Wortham noted how she used, “the information of a guy in New Jersey that I had once met in a Mexican restaurant.” Dave Their of Forbes admitted that he used his sister’s boyfriend’s father’s account in exchange for his Netflix information. But this is stealing under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, which makes it a misdemeanor with a maximum one-year prison sentence to “obtain without authorization information from a protected computer.” It is also a violation of the Digital Millennium Copy Act because it is knowingly circumventing a protection measure set up to prevent someone from watching content like “Game of Thrones” without paying. Forbes points out that a crafty prosecutor could also claim that using an HBO Go password without paying is a form of identity theft.

Submission + - NSA PRISM program linked to rendition program

pocock writes: Blogger Daniel Pocock has hypothesised about possible links between the recently exposed NSA PRISM program and the mistreatment, rendition and indefinite detention of foreign citizens, including children in Australia. He makes various connections, including the timing of British GCHQ's PRISM-powered productivity spurt as a clue about when Australia's ASIO may have gotten their hands on the data and subsequently started rounding up foreign citizens, including one pregnant woman and her two small children. The case of Dr Haneef is eerily similar, the Government even admitted in that case that his lengthy imprisonment, without charge, was solely due suspicions about what they saw in his chat history. Unlike the United States, Australia does not have a strong, legally binding bill of rights and any data that Australian authorities get through collaboration with the US may be used for violations of human rights that may not be constitutional on US soil.

Submission + - ARM hates the Lima driver. (livejournal.com)

An anonymous reader writes: ARM management seriously dislikes the project to provide an open source driver for ARMs Mali GPU. ARM management sees no advantage in an open source driver for their Mali, and they think that the Lima driver reveals too much of the internals of the Mali hardware. ARM management believes that if they actually wanted an open source driver, they could simply open source their own code. The main developer of Lima naturally doesn't buy into ARMs views or reasoning, and states that Lima will continue and that ARM cannot do anything to stop it.

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