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Submission + - When The NSA Shows Up At Your Internet Company (

Frosty Piss writes: When people say the feds are monitoring what people are doing online, what does that mean? How does that work? When, and where, does it start? Pete Ashdown, CEO of XMission, an internet service provider in Utah, knows. He received a Foreign Intelligence Service Act (FISA) warrant in 2010 mandating he let the feds monitor one of his customers, through his facility. He also received a broad gag order. Says Mr. Ashdown, "I would love to tell you all the details, but I did get the gag order... These programs that violate the Bill of Rights can continue because people can’t go out and say, This my experience, this is what happened to me, and I don’t think it is right." In this article, Mr. Ashdown tells us about the equipment the NSA installed on his network, and what he thinks it did.

Submission + - The Man Who Convinced Us We Needed Vitamin Supplements 1

An anonymous reader writes: The Atlantic has an interesting piece on the life and work of the scientist most responsible for moms around the world giving their kids Vitamin C to fight off colds, Linus Pauling. From the article: ' On October 10, 2011, researchers from the University of Minnesota found that women who took supplemental multivitamins died at rates higher than those who didn't. Two days later, researchers from the Cleveland Clinic found that men who took vitamin E had an increased risk of prostate cancer. "It's been a tough week for vitamins," said Carrie Gann of ABC News. These findings weren't new. Seven previous studies had already shown that vitamins increased the risk of cancer and heart disease and shortened lives. Still, in 2012, more than half of all Americans took some form of vitamin supplements. What few people realize, however, is that their fascination with vitamins can be traced back to one man. A man who was so spectacularly right that he won two Nobel Prizes and so spectacularly wrong that he was arguably the world's greatest quack.'

Submission + - WiFi Light Bulbs Connect to the Internet (

An anonymous reader writes: Computerworld has an interview with an Australian startup called LIFX, producing WiFi-connected LED light bulbs. Each light bulb is a small computer running the Thingsquare distribution of the open source Contiki operating system that creates a low-power wireless mesh network between the light bulbs and connects them to the WiFi network. The wireless mesh network lets the light bulbs be controlled with a smartphone app. Through a Kickstarter project, the company has already raised a significant amount of money: over one million USD. The company recently opened up a second batch of pre-orders.

Submission + - SPAM: Archaeologists Discover Lost City In Cambodian Jungle

steve_mark66 writes: Australian archaeologists using remote-sensing technology have uncovered an ancient city in Cambodia that has remained hidden for more than a millennium under dense jungle undergrowth. The discovery of Mahendraparvata, a 1,200-year-old lost city that predates Cambodia's famous Angkor Wat temple complex by 350 years, was part of the Hindu-Buddhist Khmer Empire that ruled much of Southeast Asia from about 800 to 1400 A.D., during a time that coincided with Europe's Middle Ages
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Submission + - India to send world's last telegram ( 2

afarhan writes: India will pull the plug on it's 160 year old telegram service on 15th July, this year. This will be the last telegram every sent in the world. However, telegrams are still relevant in this vast country. More than 500 million people are still without access to a phone or Internet. For these people, telegram still remains the only digital communication available. In India, telegram is also considered a legal correspondence.

Submission + - PayPal Denies Teen Reward for Finding Bug (

itwbennett writes: You have to be 18 to qualify for PayPal's bug bounty program, a minor detail that 17-year old Robert Kugler found out the hard way after being denied a reward for a website bug he reported. Curiously, the age guideline isn't in the terms and conditions posted on the PayPal website. Kugler was informed by email that he was disqualified because of his age.

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