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Submission + - DMCA take down advice

CBung writes: Hello Slashdot readers, I am involved in an open source Java strategy game engine hosted on SourceForge. We have existed for many years and our development is volunteer based. We use the engine to play clones of a popular WWII board game as well as many community created mods and maps. The popularity of the board game is the driving force behind the successfulness of our application. Most users have "been playing that board game for 20yrs", and most of us own at least one of the board games. We love being able to play on line and develop our skills on the board game maps at an international level. Unfortunately, we've recently been hit by a DMCA take down notice from the rights holder the board game that we clone. The IP holder did create a PC version of the board game in 1998 which was poorly maintained and another reason our application was created. At this point, our initial reaction is to simply remove the specifically cloned maps, and maintain our application with many of our user mods. However, many of our mods use the same units and game mechanics/rules as the board game. Is there any way we can keep our application, including the clones of the board game maps, alive?

I will also note that the rights holder recently released an on line version of their board game thats playable on line. However it is very specific and limited in options. It seems more then coincidental that we've received this notice now that their own game lobby is on line. Can our application take refuge in another country? Is there a way to keep our application alive since it is significantly more feature full?
The Internet

Submission + - New bill would reverse bans on municipal broadband (

Yuppie writes: A bill introduced to the House this week would overturn bans that currently exist in several states on cities and towns building and deploying their own broadband networks. The big telecoms may not be be too happy about the bill, however. 'The telecoms have historically argued that municipalities that own and operate — or even build and lease — broadband networks could give themselves preferential treatment. The Act anticipates that argument with a section on "competition neutrality." Public providers would be banned from giving themselves any "regulatory preference," which should create a level playing field for all broadband providers. Municipalities interested in getting into the broadband business would also have to solicit feedback from the private sector on planned deployments.' The full text of the bill is available from Rep. Boucher's website (PDF).

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BASIC is to computer programming as QWERTY is to typing. -- Seymour Papert