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Submission + - 6 seconds: How hackers only need moments to guess card number and security code (telegraph.co.uk) 1

schwit1 writes: Criminals can work out the card number, expiry date and security code for a Visa debit or credit card in as little as six seconds using guesswork, researchers have found.

Fraudsters use a so-called Distributed Guessing Attack to get around security features put in place to stop online fraud, and this may have been the method used in the recent Tesco Bank hack.

According to a study published in the academic journal IEEE Security & Privacy, that meant fraudsters could use computers to systematically fire different variations of security data at hundreds of websites simultaneously.

Within seconds, by a process of elimination, the criminals could verify the correct card number, expiry date and the three-digit security number on the back of the card.

Mohammed Ali, a PhD student at the university's School of Computing Science, said: "This sort of attack exploits two weaknesses that on their own are not too severe but, when used together, present a serious risk to the whole payment system.

Submission + - Florida Cops Have a New Device For Tracking Your Cell Phone (warisboring.com)

schwit1 writes: The Harpoon, according to a brochure from 2008 published by Ars Technica in 2013, is an amplifier that âoemaximizesâ the capability of the Stingray II and âoesignificantly improves the performance of the single-channel Stingray and KingFish systems,â which are other Harris surveillance products.

One of the leaked picture shows what appears to be the back of the device, along with its identification number issued by the Federal Communications Commission and a barcode that says the device is property of the Florida Department of Law Enforcement.

Submission + - Do Your Family Members Have a Right to Your Genetic Code? (technologyreview.com)

schwit1 writes: When a woman gets her genome sequenced, questions about privacy arise for her identical twin sister.

Patients must give their informed consent before undergoing whole-genome sequencing or any other genetic test. But there are no laws that restrict what patients can do with their own genetic information, or that require patients’ family members to be involved in the consent process. This raises questions about who owns an individual’s genetic code, since family members share many genetic traits and may harbor the same genetic abnormalities associated with certain diseases.

Submission + - Aspartame stops us from getting slimmer (dw.com)

schwit1 writes: For some time, nutritionists have suspected that artificial sweetener — often used as a substitute for sugar in coffee or added as an essential ingredient in diet sodas — does not help people lose weight. However, scientists have struggled to understand why this is the case.

Now, researchers from the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have found a lead. "We found that aspartame blocks a gut enzyme called intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP)". IAP is produced in the small intestine. "We previously showed [this enzyme] can prevent obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome [a disease characterized by a combination of obesity, high blood pressure, a metabolic disorder and insulin resistence]. So, we think that aspartame might not work because, even as it is substituting for sugar, it blocks the beneficial aspects of IAP."

The researchers confirmed their suspicions via a variety of tests on mice. In one case, they fed IAP directly to mice, who were also on a high-fat diet. It turned out that the IAP could effectively prevent the emergence of the metabolic syndrome. It also helped relieve symptoms in animals that were already suffering from the obesity-related illness.

Submission + - 48 Organizations Now Have Access To Every Brit's Browsing Hstory (zerohedge.com)

schwit1 writes: Last week, in a troubling development for privacy advocates everywhere, we reported that the UK has passed the "snooper charter" effectively ending all online privacy. Now, the mainstream media has caught on and appears to be displeased. As AP writes today, "after months of wrangling, Parliament has passed a contentious new snooping law that gives authorities — from police and spies to food regulators, fire officials and tax inspectors — powers to look at the internet browsing records of everyone in the country."

For those who missed our original reports, here is the new law in a nutshell: it requires telecom companies to keep records of all users' web activity for a year, creating databases of personal information that the firms worry could be vulnerable to leaks and hackers. Civil liberties groups say the law establishes mass surveillance of British citizens, following innocent internet users from the office to the living room and the bedroom. They are right.

Which government agencies have access to the internet history of any British citizen? Here is the answer courtesy of blogger Chris Yuo, who has compiled the list:

Metropolitan police force
City of London police force
Police forces maintained under section 2 of the Police Act 1996
Police Service of Scotland
Police Service of Northern Ireland
British Transport Police
Ministry of Defence Police
Royal Navy Police
Royal Military Police
Royal Air Force Police
Security Service
Secret Intelligence Service
GCHQ
Ministry of Defence
Department of Health
Home Office
Ministry of Justice
National Crime Agency
HM Revenue & Customs
Department for Transport
Department for Work and Pensions
NHS trusts and foundation trusts in England that provide ambulance services
Common Services Agency for the Scottish Health Service
Competition and Markets Authority
Criminal Cases Review Commission
Department for Communities in Northern Ireland
Department for the Economy in Northern Ireland
Department of Justice in Northern Ireland
Financial Conduct Authority
Fire and rescue authorities under the Fire and Rescue Services Act 2004
Food Standards Agency
Food Standards Scotland
Gambling Commission
Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority
Health and Safety Executive
Independent Police Complaints Commissioner
Information Commissioner
NHS Business Services Authority
Northern Ireland Ambulance Service Health and Social Care Trust
Northern Ireland Fire and Rescue Service Board
Northern Ireland Health and Social Care Regional Business Services Organisation
Office of Communications
Office of the Police Ombudsman for Northern Ireland
Police Investigations and Review Commissioner
Scottish Ambulance Service Board
Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission
Serious Fraud Office
Welsh Ambulance Services National Health Service Trust

Comment Burning in Hell next to Hitler, Mao and Stalin (Score 0, Troll) 269

If this were a just world, 13 facts would be etched on Castro's tombstone and highlighted in every obituary, as bullet points - a fitting metaphor for someone who used firing squads to murder thousands of his own people.
  • He turned Cuba into a colony of the Soviet Union and nearly caused a nuclear holocaust.
  • He sponsored terrorism wherever he could and allied himself with many of the worst dictators on earth.
  • He was responsible for so many thousands of executions and disappearances in Cuba that a precise number is hard to reckon.
  • He brooked no dissent and built concentration camps and prisons at an unprecedented rate, filling them to capacity, incarcerating a higher percentage of his own people than most other modern dictators, including Stalin.
  • He condoned and encouraged torture and extrajudicial killings.
  • He forced nearly 20 percent of his people into exile, and prompted thousands to meet their deaths at sea, unseen and uncounted, while fleeing from him in crude vessels.
  • He claimed all property for himself and his henchmen, strangled food production and impoverished the vast majority of his people.
  • He outlawed private enterprise and labor unions, wiped out Cuba's large middle class and turned Cubans into slaves of the state.
  • He persecuted gay people and tried to eradicate religion.

Submission + - Early explorer logbooks reveal sea ice have not changed in 100 yrs (sciencealert.com) 2

bricko writes: Early explorer logbooks reveal Antarctic sea ice has barely changed in 100 years

Logbooks from the likes of Captain Robert Scott and Sir Ernest Shackleton — key figures in the 'Heroic Age' of Antarctic exploration — have revealed that sea ice levels in Antarctica have barely changed over the past century, despite global temperatures hitting record highs year after year.

Submission + - Delete yourself from many Internet Sites by pressing this button (thenextweb.com)

schwit1 writes: The internet can be a beautiful and horrible place at the same time, and it isn't weird to sometimes feel like you want to leave — there's wasn't an easy way out, until now.

Swedish developers Wille Dahlbo and Linus Unnebäck created Deseat.me, which offers a way to wipe your entire existence off the internet in a few clicks.

When logging into the website with a Google account it scans for apps and services you've created an account for, and creates a list of them with easy delete links.

Every account it finds gets paired with an easy delete link pointing to the unsubscribe page for that service. Within in a few clicks you're freed from it, and depending on how long you need to work through the entire list, you can be account-less within the hour.

Can we get this for government databases too?

Submission + - Deepest water found 1000km down, a third of way to Earth's core (newscientist.com)

schwit1 writes: JULES VERNE’s idea of an ocean deep below the surface in Journey to the Centre of the Earth may not have been too far off. Earth’s mantle may contain many oceans’ worth of water – with the deepest 1000 kilometres down.

“If it wasn’t down there, we would all be submerged,” says Steve Jacobsen at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, whose team made the discovery. “This implies a bigger reservoir of water on the planet than previously thought.”

This water is much deeper than any seen before, at a third of the way to the edge of Earth’s core. Its presence was indicated by a diamond spat out 90 million years ago by a volcano near the São Luíz river in Juina, Brazil.

Submission + - Scientists Believe They Finally Have The Cure For The Common Cold

schwit1 writes: As winter sets in it's just a matter of time before the inevitable cold gets you and turns you into a snotty, bunged up wreck.

Unless you're elderly or a baby, the common cold is by no means life-threatening. But it's very annoying and, worse still, you get no sympathy, just people backing away in case they catch it.

However, after decades of research, the fabled cure for the common cold could be on its way in the form of a nasal spray called SynGEM, which is the brainchild of a Dutch biotechnology company.

After successful tests on mice and rats (yes, they get colds too), 36 human volunteers at London's Imperial College are now trying out the spray, which is hoped to kill off a cold before you've even had time to buy that family pack of tissues.

Submission + - Humans Are Born to Move (nytimes.com)

schwit1 writes: Are we fighting thousands of years of evolutionary history and the best interests of our bodies when we sit all day?

That question is at the core of a fascinating new study of the daily lives and cardiovascular health of a modern tribe of hunter-gatherers. The findings strongly suggest that we are born to be in motion, with health consequences when we are not.

Evolutionary biologists have long believed that the basic structure of human bodies and genomes were set tens of thousands of years ago, when we were hunter-gatherers. The hunter-gatherers from that time who were most adept at following game or finding tubers won the baby-making lottery and passed along their genes to us, their descendants.

But we no longer live in a hunting and gathering world. Mostly we live in offices and in front of screens, where we sit and have food brought to us, creating a fundamental mismatch between the conditions that molded our bodies and those that we inhabit.

The health consequences of this mismatch are well-established. Many scientists have pointed out that the easy availability of food creates an “obesogenic” world, in which we easily gain weight and develop related health problems.

Submission + - An Underground Ice Deposit on Mars Is Bigger Than New Mexico (popularmechanics.com)

schwit1 writes: A single underground deposit of ice on Mars contains about as much water as there is in Michigan's Lake Superior, according to new research from NASA.

The deposit rests in the mid-northern latitudes of the Red Planet, specifically in the Utopia Planitia region. Discovered by the Shallow Subsurface Radar (SHARD) instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), the deposit is "more extensive in area than the state of New Mexico," according to a NASA press release. It ranges in thickness from about 260 feet to about 560 feet, and has a composition that's 50 to 85 percent water ice, with what appears to be dust or larger rocky particles mixed in as well.

Submission + - Australian Government gave Clinton Foundation $88 million

lxrocks writes: Reports emerging in Australia, that for the past 10 years, the Australian government has donated $88 million of Taxpayer money to the Bill, Hillary and Chelsea Clinton Foundation.

This was confirmed in a statement by the current Australian Foreign minister, Ms Julie Bishop, that Australian Government have donated $88 million to Clinton Foundation since 2006.

It is also reported that deposed prime Minister, Juila Gillard became chairman of the Clinton-affiliated Global Partnership for Education in 2014.

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