Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Compare cell phone plans using Wirefly's innovative plan comparison tool ×

Submission + - Ad Exec: Learn to Code or You're Dead to Me 1

theodp writes: In a widely-read WSJ Op-Ed, English major Kirk McDonald, president of online ad optimization service PubMatic, informed college grads that he considers them unemployable unless they can claim familiarity with at least two programming languages. 'Teach yourself just enough of the grammar and the logic of computer languages to be able to see the big picture,' McDonald advises. 'Get acquainted with APIs. Dabble in a bit of Python. For most employers, that would be more than enough.' Over at Typical Programmer, Greg Jorgensen is not impressed. 'I have some complaints about this "everyone must code" movement,' Jorgensen writes, 'and Mr. McDonald’s article gives me a starting point because he touched on so many of them.' Nice rebuttal, and one might add that even a programming whiz might find it tough to land a job at PubMatic — a 2011 USA Today article noted that PubMatic maintained its 100-person development team in India. Why? 'It is easier to find and retain engineers in India,' explained CEO Rajeev Goel (McDonald's boss). 'And it is more affordable.'

Submission + - Psychiatrists Cast Doubt on Biomedical Model of Mental Illness (guardian.co.uk) 2

jones_supa writes: British Psychological Society's division of clinical psychology (DCP) will on Monday issue a statement declaring that, given the lack of evidence, it is time for a 'paradigm shift' in how the issues of mental health are understood. According to their claim, there is no scientific evidence that psychiatric diagnoses such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are valid or useful. The statement effectively casts doubt on psychiatry's predominantly biomedical model of mental distress – the idea that people are suffering from illnesses that are treatable by doctors using drugs. The DCP said its decision to speak out 'reflects fundamental concerns about the development, personal impact and core assumptions of the (diagnosis) systems', used by psychiatry.

The provocative statement by the DCP has been timed to come out shortly before the release of DSM-5, the fifth edition of the American Psychiatry Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. The manual has been attacked for expanding the range of mental health issues that are classified as disorders.

The Internet

Submission + - Patent Troll Claims Ownership of Interactive Web (wired.com)

wiedzmin writes: A low-profile Chicago biologist, Michael Doyle, and his company Eola Technologies, who has once won a $521m patent lawsuit against Microsoft, claim that it was actually he and two co-inventors who invented, and patented, the “interactive web” before anyone else, back in 1993. Doyle argues that a program he created to allow doctors to view embryos over the early Internet, was the first program that allowed users to interact with images inside of a web browser window. He is therefore seeking royalties for the use of just about every modern interactive Internet technology, like watching videos or suggesting instant search results. Dozens of lawyers, representing the world’s biggest internet companies, including Yahoo, Amazon, Google and YouTube are acting as defendants in the case, which has even seen Tim Berners-Lee testify on Tuesday.
PlayStation (Games)

Submission + - PlayStation controller pilots tiny quadrocopter (gamepron.com)

dotarray writes: While the PlayStation Network remains down, and your thoughts keep drifting to the safety of your personal details, it’s understandable that you might be looking for something to distract you.

How about using that Bluetooth PlayStation controller to navigate a teeny tiny little quadrocopter? It’s not like you can use it for much else, these days

Sony

Submission + - Can it get any worse for Sony (wired.com)

meriksen writes: For the few of you left who still trusted Sony, now comes news of yet another massive data breach, this time for Sony Online Entertainment (SOE) users. SOE is their online multiplayer games offering. It sounds like a similar issue to the PSN hack, again with lots of data being taken. Making matters worse, apparently for players outside the US, Sony kept credit card numbers and/or bank details in an "outdated database" (read, one not properly secured or encrypted, apparently). And... Sony is now admitting that the breach occurred a few weeks ago, so this info has probably already been put to use.
Crime

Submission + - Google Raided In South Korea (ibtimes.com)

RedEaredSlider writes: South Korean police raided Google's offices in Seoul as they investigate whether the company illegally gathered private data.

Head of the police cyber crime unit, Chang Byuk-Duk, told the Agence-France Presse that the police were sent to the company's offices to secure evidence related to the AdMob platform. Google is accused of gathering data on users' locations via smartphone applications. The local site Daum was also raided, based on similar allegations.

Submission + - Fake AV Makers, Scammers Exploit Bin Laden News (computerworld.com)

Batblue writes: "Malware makers and scammers have quickly latched onto the news that U.S. military forces killed Osama Bin Laden, security researchers said today. Antivirus vendors have spotted multiple threats based on the news, including links that lead to fake security software — dubbed "rogueware" — attack code masquerading as plug-ins that users must supposedly download to view videos and attempts to harvest personal information.

Cyber criminals wasted no time in leveraging the news. "Hackers love a big, breaking story, said Rob Rachwald of Imperva, a Redwood Shores, Calif. security firm, in a post to the company's blog Monday.

Rachwald reported that Imperva had monitored forums where hackers bragged about posting fake videos, then duping users into clicking a Facebook "Like" button that in fact generates "Likes" to a product or service page they're promoting."

Cloud

Submission + - Breaches of Trust from Amazon and Sony (enterpriseefficiency.com)

kg4gwa writes: Amazon and Sony suffered different troubles last week, but each one caused major headaches for users, and each company showed its own way of failing in the aftermath. Will Sony's security breach mean that Amazon gets a free pass for losing customer data?
Technology

Submission + - NEC Tech Controls Devices Via Arm Taps (gizmag.com)

Zothecula writes: Fiddling with small buttons or touchscreens on your mobile device when you're running, riding a bike or even just crossing the street can be a frustrating – and dangerous – endeavor. NEC is looking to solve this dilemma by developing a system that enables users to operate devices by just tapping their arm. The ArmKeypad is made up of acceleration sensors worn on each wrist that determine the area of the arm tapped by a user and translate this into different input commands via a Bluetooth link.

Slashdot Top Deals

Wishing without work is like fishing without bait. -- Frank Tyger

Working...