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Music

Submission + - Computer Program 'Evolves' Music From Noise (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: Researchers have developed a program, called DarwinTunes, that produces 8-second sequences of randomly generated sounds, or loops, from a database of digital "genes." Now, with input from 7000 internet users who act as "natural selectors", the program has "evolved" these bits of noise into real music. Although the resulting strains are hardly Don Giovanni, the finding shows how users' tastes exert their own kind of natural selection on popular music, nudging tunes to evolve out of cacophony.
Ubuntu

Submission + - MIT Builds 96-Core, Solar-Powered Ubuntu ARM Super Computer (phoronix.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Days after building a 12-core Ubuntu ARM cluster, Phoronix was at MIT participating in a build of a 96-core ARM cluster built out of 48 PandaBoards. Ubuntu 12.04 LTS was running on the nearly 100 cores and the entire computer — built inside of a trash can — was powered via a single solar panel.
Space

Submission + - Missing Matter, Parralel Universes ? (universetoday.com)

Phoghat writes: "Could mirror universes or parallel worlds account for dark matter — the ‘missing’ matter in the Universe? In what seems to be mixing of science and science fiction, a new paper by a team of theoretical physicists hypothesizes the existence of mirror particles as a possible candidate for dark matter. An anomaly observed in the behavior of ordinary particles that appear to oscillate in and out of existence could be from a “hypothetical parallel world consisting of mirror particles,” says a press release from Springer. “Each neutron would have the ability to transition into its invisible mirror twin, and back, oscillating from one world to the other.”"
Security

Submission + - Could Security Breaches Cost Lives? (net-security.org)

An anonymous reader writes: Over a quarter of companies believe that if their sites go down or they suffer a major security breach it could potentially cost customers' their lives, according to AlienVault. When asked who they most feared would violate their privacy, the answer was overwhelmingly the Chinese, with 40% of respondents admitting this was the country that worried them the most. The U.S. government and Russians tied at 13%; and the UK government trailed slightly at 12%. Aliens and Israeli’s came out at 4% each. Just 5% felt confident enough to claim they were not worried about anyone violating their privacy.
Facebook

Submission + - SPAM: Facebook

Techfacts writes: Facebook Inc bounced back from record lows in frenetic trading on Thursday to finish in positive territory for the first time in four days, lifted in late trade by a U.S. market rebound and a brokerage upgrade.
Link to Original Source
Music

Submission + - Amanda Palmer raises $1M from fans for her album (blogspot.com) 1

NewYorkCountryLawyer writes: "The music industry will never be the same. Singer Amanda Palmer (@amandapalmer on Twitter), has just raised over $1,000,000 directly from her fans, through Twitter and other social media, to mix, promote, and distribute her new album. Armed only with a Kickstarter page, social media accounts, and a lot of friends, she has just liberated a lot of musicians from the tyranny of having to 'sign' with a big studio. I predict music business historians will be writing about this day for years to come. The "big 4" record companies just got a lot smaller."
Software

Submission + - The Evolution of Data Management (datanami.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A condensed history of data management with some graphics, highlighting of important trends. As un-boring as something like this can be.
Security

Submission + - Scammers Working Harder to Fool Consumers (net-security.org)

An anonymous reader writes: The number of unique phishing reports submitted to the APWG rose substantially from early fall through the end of the year, while cybercrime gangs were apparently forced to work harder and smarter to fool increasingly fraud-savvy consumers into falling for their confidence schemes. Over the last half of 2011 there was a visible trend of phishers and scammers seeking to hide their intentions. Even fewer phishing websites are using the oh-so-obvious IP host to host their fake login pages, instead preferring to host on a compromised domain.
Businesses

Submission + - This Is the Way Facebook Ends (vice.com)

pigrabbitbear writes: "For the past eight years, Facebook has been the central neural network of the Internet’s link-sharing brain. But as the site has grown, so have our needs. Now that the company’s public, it’s crunch time, and the skeptics and haters are lining up to talk about how it might all end. One thing’s for certain: whether it’s a bang or a whimper, Facebook is not forever. How could it collapse? Let me count the ways."
Hardware

Submission + - Physicist explains Moore's Law collapse in 10years (geek.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Moore’s Law won’t be true forever, and theoretical physicist Michio Kaku has explained how it will collapse. And that collapse isn’t going to happen in some distant future, it is going to happen within the next decade.

The problem is one of finding a replacement for silicon coupled with the exponential nature of Moore’s Law. Quite simply, computing power cannot go on doubling every two years indefinitely.

The other issue is we are about to reach the limits of silicon. According to Kaku, once we get done to 5nm processes for chip production, silicon is finished. Any smaller and processors will just overheat.

Hardware

Submission + - Silicene discovered: Single-layer silicon that could beat graphene to market (extremetech.com)

MrSeb writes: "Numerous research groups around the world are reporting that they have created silicene, a one-atom-thick hexagonal mesh of silicon atoms — the silicon equivalent of graphene. You will have heard a lot about graphene, especially with regard to its truly wondrous electrical properties, but it has one rather major problem: It doesn't have a bandgap, which makes it very hard to integrate into existing semiconductor processes. Silicene, on the other hand, is theorized to have excellent electrical properties, while still being compatible with silicon-based electronics. For now, silicene has only been observed (with a scanning tunneling electron microscope), but the next step is to grow a silicene film on an insulating substrate so that its properties can be properly investigated."
Desktops (Apple)

Submission + - Flashback Trojan Hits 600,000 Macs and Counting (techweekeurope.co.uk)

twoheadedboy writes: "A Flashback variant dubbed Backdoor.Flashback.39 has infected over 600,000 Macs, according to Russian security firm Dr Web. The virulent Flashback trojan infecting Apple machines sparked interest earlier this week after it was seen exploiting a Java vulnerability, although it was actually first discovered back in September last year. The Trojan has a global reach after Dr Web found infected Macs in most countries. More than half of the Macs infected are in the US (56.6 percent), while another 19.8 percent are in Canada. The UK has 12.8 percent of infected Macs."

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