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Science

Submission + - NIH Director Supports Release of Bird Flu Research (nih.gov)

renek writes: Common Sense has struck again as the director for the National Institute of Health has called for the release of two studies about the deadly H5N1 avian flu virus. The U.S. Government had previously advised that the research not be published in the journals Science and Nature. From the article,

"On March 29 and 30, the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity (NSABB), an independent expert committee that advises the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and other Federal departments and agencies on matters of biosecurity, convened to review unpublished revised manuscripts describing NIH-funded research on the transmissibility of H5N1 influenza virus—the strain commonly referred to as "bird flu"
During its March meeting, the NSABB took into account the new and clarified information in the manuscripts, additional perspectives provided by influenza biology experts, highly pertinent but as yet unpublished epidemiologic data, and relevant security information. After careful deliberation, the NSABB unanimously recommended the revised manuscript by Dr. Yoshihiro Kawaoka be communicated in full.

Submission + - Verizon Announces Pay-Per-Use "Turbo Boost" for Te (pcmag.com)

renek writes: In one of the most brazen attacks on net neutrality to date, Verizon has announced it will offer a so called "Turbo Boost" for smart phones that run on it's wireless network.
"Verizon will publish an API that could allow consumers to "turbocharge" the network bandwidth their smartphone apps use for a small fee, executives said Tuesday. Verizon anticipates that a customer running an app on a smartphone will have the option to dynamically snatch more bandwidth for that app, if network congestion slows it down, said Hugh Fletcher, associate director for technology in Verizon's Product Development and Technology team. The app, however, must be running what Verizon referred to as the network optimization API it is currently developing, and hopes to publish by the third quarter of 2012."

Submission + - Entertainment Industry's Dystopia of the Future (eff.org) 1

renek writes: If you think the RIAA/MPAA's tactics have been outlandish, laughable, and disconcerting in the past you haven't seen anything yet. From government-mandated spyware that deletes infringing content to border searches of media players, this reads like an Orwellian nightmare. Given the US government's willingness to bend over for Big Media it wouldn't be terribly surprising to see how far this goes and how under the radar it stays.

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