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Comment Re:SecureID on a chip? (Score 4, Interesting) 53

Almost.

The MIT solution, as described, appears to do away with the clock-based system that RSA uses, and instead has the server and the chip stay in lock-step as transactions occur.

What happens when the two drift out of synchronization will be the key to disrupting the technology.

If the server and chip stop talking to each other when they get out of synch, then the whole system is vulnerable to a wide scale DOS simply by corrupting the server's database of keys.

Imagine an industrial plant manager's reaction when 1000 different devices brick themselves due to a hacker's attack. If it takes a day to replace and reset everything so it all works again, that manager will rip out the technology so that his or her plant is never down that long, ever again.

On the other hand, if the server and chip and re-synchronize after a glitch, then a hacker can emulate that resynchronization process.

I wonder if a Man in the Middle attack would work where the MiM and server exchange one set of keys, while the MiM and chip exchange a second set of keys. Would either side know that it was talking to a fraudulent data source?

Comment Isn't 1080p enough?" (Score 2) 333

No.

1080p is fine for watching movies - but that is not the only thing that I use my laptop for.

I need a mobile workstation, and when I dropped $3k on a laptop last year, finding a major brand with a resolution better/taller than 1920x1080 would have been the deciding factor.

It looks like some of the major manufacturers have figured it out, finally.

Comment I love doing that, actually (Score 5, Insightful) 292

My primary goal as a contractor is to "put myself out of a job". It can be scary to let go of an existing income stream, but no job is a guarantee. If I walk out of a site with a happy customer, they have an incentive to hire me back ... and I get to work on something new (to me), rather than being stuck maintaining the same code for years.

There are risks, but if your replacement flames out, they can always come back to you, later.

Comment Your problem statement needs some adjustment (Score 1) 276

Here is my re-statement of your situation:

You care very deeply about your project. Your Program Manager has recently made a decision to bring on new people. You are concerned that these new people are not necessary, and may be detrimental to the project.

More to the point, you do not understand the reason why your PM feels that more people are necessary at this time.

Since you have a good working relationship with your PM, that is your starting point - ask why the change is a good idea. Do not respond immediately - listen to the response you are given, spend some time thinking about, and THEN make a decision. Your PM could be spot on (example: "I believe that you will need more people in about 8 months, and it takes 6 months to actually get them in place. I figure we have about 2 months of wiggle room if I start the process, now. I do not need to waste your valuable time handling what are essentially HR duties...") or could be making a mistake ("I want a bigger office, so I am growing my empire..."), or could be acting upon orders ("The owner is concerned that if you leave or get hit by abus, we're screwed. We need to have a back-up for you in place, just in case...").

Currently, you do not have enough information. If you get stonewalled by the PM, then go over his or her head.

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