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Privacy

Submission + - 82% of IT Workers Report Data Breaches (i4u.com)

i4u writes: In the wake of Sony's data debacle, corporations around the world are taking another look at information security. Storing your data behind a firewall isn't enough, and trusting on client-side protections to keep the bad people out is what screwed the PlayStation Network. The industry is grappling for a solution, especially with the news that 82% of IT practitioners questioned report at least one breach of their systems.

The cost of a stolen file varies pretty wildly. The average figure is $214...but entities lose an average of 16,000 records per data breach.

Facebook

Submission + - Facebook "archiving" all groups (facebook.com)

Sprotch writes: The following message has appeared over the first page of all groups:
"Over the next few months, Facebook will be archiving all groups created using the old groups format. Moving forward, you can create groups using the new groups format, which makes it easy to share with the important groups in your life."
As part of the archiving process, members of the old group get deleted. In other words, "archived" groups are destroyed.
While facebook claims that it is possible to upgrade to the new groups, this option is not available for larger groups, which are most at need of it.

IBM

Submission + - The Complex Information Security Landscape (net-security.org)

Orome1 writes: We live in complex times. The black hats have seemingly endless resources while the good guys have to get management approval for all their tools. What can a large organization do to stay on top of the fast-paced threat landscape while fighting on a limited budget? In this interview, Latha Maripuri, Director, IBM Security Services and Marc van Zadelhoff, Director of Strategy, IBM Security Solutions, discuss the increasingly complex information security landscape by addressing budget strategies, cloud computing security, mobile devices and more.
Science

Submission + - Signs of Dark Matter from Minnesota Mine (sciencenews.org)

thomst writes: "Ron Cowen of Science News reports that on May 2nd, at the American Physical Society meeting in Anaheim, CA, Juan Collar, team leader of COGENT, an experimental effort to detect WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles), presented a paper detailing 15 months of data collected via a pure germanium detector located deep in a Minnesota mine which seems to confirm similar results reported by a European effort called DAMA/LIBRA. The results are particularly intriguing, because they appear to show a seasonal variation in the density of WIMPs that accords with models that predict that Earth should encounter more WIMPs in Summer (when its path around the Sun moves in the same direction as the Milky Way revolves) than in Winter (when it goes the opposite direction). The most interesting thing about the COGENT experiment is that the mass of the WIMP candidates it records is significantly less than most particle physicists had predicted, according to popular models. If the interactions recorded by COGENT are eventually confirmed as WIMP encounters, wholesale revisions to the so-called "Standard Model" may be required. (Cowen wrote an earlier article about COGENT last year that goes into a lot more detail about how COGENT works, what its team expects it to find, and why."
Technology

Submission + - Intel Designs Faster, 3D Transistor (nytimes.com)

lee1 writes: "Intel has found a way to keep on the Moore's Law track by making smaller, faster and lower-power computer chips by building 3D transistors. They are already manufacturing microprocessors using this new design, called a FINFET (for fin field-effect transistor), which incorporates a small pillar, or fin, of silicon that sticks up above the surface of the chip. Intel said that it expected to be able to make chips that run as much as 37 percent faster in low-voltage applications and use as much as 50 percent less power. Products based on the new technology may appear some time later this year."
IOS

Submission + - iOS fix for tracking issue just two weeks away (edibleapple.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Apple last week officially addressed the controversy surrounding the consolidated.db file found in iOS 4. Now BGR relays that they've obtained an early build of iOS 4.3.3 — an iOS update set to fix many of the bugs Apple acknowledged with its current implementation of the consolidated.db file.

Submission + - How to monitor your Internet data transfer amounts 1

Vrtigo1 writes: With many ISPs either already using bandwidth caps or talking about them, I was wondering how other Slashdot readers are keeping tabs on how much data is being transferred through their home Internet connections. None of the consumer routers I've used seem to make this information easily accessible. I'd like some way to see exactly how much data has been sent and received by the WAN port facing my ISP's modem so I can compare the numbers I get with the numbers they give me. I don't want to pay for their modem firmware updates and other network management traffic, so I'd like to see how the two numbers line up.
IT

Submission + - The Features That Make Each Web Browser Unique (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "InfoWorld's Peter Wayner offers a look at 13 promising features unique to one browser. From Chrome's support for SPDY, to IE9's emphasis on energy efficiency, to Firefox Sync, browser vendors are working hard to establish any edge that might attract more users to their stack of code. And while speed and HTML5 compatability remain key in the battle of the Web browsers, unique features often point the way forward. 'Given the pace of browser updates these days, don't be surprised to find the best of the bunch being copied by competitors soon,' Wayner writes. 'After all, yesterday's browser bells and whistles are today's must-have features.'"
Technology

Submission + - Supercharging touchscreen interaction, with Ringbo (elektor.in)

Elektor_India writes: "Without a doubt, touchscreen technology has brought a whole new level of interaction with our devices. Israel's Efrat Barit and Saar Shai, however, believe that the functionality of touch-enabled devices could be greatly enhanced with the development of their Ringbow concept. Worn on the index finger, the ring-like device can be programmed to add extra capabilities to existing actions, activate entirely new touch options, or liberate the user's hands from the surface of the display for Kinect-like, spatial control over touchscreen device operation."
News

Submission + - Bin Laden's Death Being Used to Spread Malware (securityweek.com)

wiredmikey writes: Today, we have another major news event for cybercriminals to take advantage of. Following the successful operation by U.S. forces to kill Osama bin Laden, Internet users are searching in the masses for any details about the incident they can find. Cybercriminals know this and have already been at work to "poison" common search results hoping to gain access to people's computers and infect them with malware.

Links are already beginning to spread across Facebook, similar to what happened following news of the recent earthquake in Japan. Users should be cautious of spam containing links to photos, videos and other information that sounds remarkably interesting on Bin Laden’s death. Users also need to be cautious of Tweets through Twitter, and Facebook posts, as cybercriminals gear up to attract unsuspecting users to spread malware. [More]

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