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Submission + - Visual ARM1 - Celebrating ARM's 25th Anniversary (visual6502.org)

trebonian writes: Today is the 25th anniversary of ARM Ltd., UK. To celebrate and honor their amazing work, we present the Visual ARM1, created in collaboration with some of ARM's founding engineers.

Designed by Sophie Wilson and Steve Furber before there was an ARM Ltd., the Acorn RISC Machine was the first of a line of processors that power our cell phones and tablets today. Unlike our projects based on microscope images, the Visual ARM was created from a resurrected .cif chip layout file, used under our license agreement with ARM. We also photographed one of the few ARM1 chips at very high resolution, and our photograph is featured at the Centre for Computing History in Cambridge.

Credit goes to ARM founding engineers John Biggs for inspiring the project, discovering the tape, and recovering a usable .cif file, Lee Smith for spotting the variable record format used to encode the file (an artifact of the VMS on Acorn's VAX that at first appeared to be widespread corruption of the file), to Cambridge University Computing Services for reading the Exabyte tape, and to ARM founder Dave Howard for help unraveling the VLSI CIF dialect. Our chip simulation and visualization was developed by Barry Silverman, Brian Silverman, Ed Spittles, and Greg James.

Supercomputing

Submission + - Building the world's seventh fastest supercomputer (pcpro.co.uk)

Barence writes: "On Monday, the world's seventh fastest supercomputer went live in Texas. Stampede is a Dell PowerEdge C8220 cluster packed with Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors: it has more than 6,000 compute nodes, more than 96,000 processing cores and 205TB of memory, for close to ten petaflops of peak performance. Built by the Texas Advanced Computing Center, it took two years to develop and will serve the needs of open science research. PC Pro sat down with TACC's director Jay Boisseau to find out what goes into building a supercomputer like Stampede, how everything is paid for, what can go wrong — and what happens to supercomputers when they retire."
Security

Submission + - Computer scientists find vulnerabilities in Cisco VoIP phones (scienceblog.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: Columbia University researchers say they've found serious vulnerabilities in Cisco VoIPtelephones, devices used around the world by a broad range of networked organizations from governments to banks to major corporations, and beyond. Specifically, they found security breaches with Cisco’s underlying VoIP phone technology and showed how to insert malicious code into any of the 14 Cisco Unified IP Phone models to start eavesdropping on private conversations—not just on the phone but also in the phone’s surroundings—from anywhere in the world.
Science

Submission + - Life found in deepest layer of Earth's crust (newscientist.com)

michaelmarshall writes: For the first time life has been found in the gabbroic layer of the crust. The new biosphere is all bacteria, as you might expect, but they are different to the bacteria in the layers above: they mostly feed on hydrocarbons that are produced by abiotic reactions deep in the crust. It could mean that similar microbes are living even deeper, perhaps even in the mantle.
Crime

Submission + - Scalpers bought tix with CAPTCHA-busting botnet (networkworld.com)

alphadogg writes: Three California men have pleaded guilty charges they built a network of CAPTCHA-solving computers that flooded online ticket vendors and snatched up the very best seats for Bruce Springsteen concerts, Broadway productions and even TV tapings of Dancing with the Stars.

The men ran a company called Wiseguy Tickets, and for years they had an inside track on some of the best seats in the house at many events. They scored about 1.5 million tickets after hiring Bulgarian programmers to build "a nationwide network of computers that impersonated individual visitors" on websites such as Ticketmaster, MLB.com and LiveNation, the U.S. Department of Justice (DoJ) said Thursday in a press release. The network would "flood vendors computers at the exact moment that event tickets went on sale," the DoJ said.

They had to create shell corporations, register hundreds of fake Internet domains (one was stupidcellphone.com) and sign up for thousands of bogus e-mail addresses to make the scam work. Wiseguy Tickets then resold the tickets to brokers, at a profit.

"These defendants made money by combining age-old fraud with new-age computer hacking," the DoJ said in its press release.

Hardware

Submission + - PCIe 3.0 standard goes live (thinq.co.uk)

Stoobalou writes: The PCI Special Interest group, the body responsible for managing the PCI family of industry standards, has announced the release of the PCI Express 3.0 standard — and it promises to make future hardware fly.

The PCIe 3.0 standard increases the bandwidth available on each PCI Express lane compared to the current PCIe 2.0 standard to an impressive eight gigatransfers per second from five gigatransfers per second.

That equates to around 1GB/s of bandwidth per lane or 16GB/s for a PCIe-x16 slot, as typically used for high-performance graphics cards. In theory, a bidirectional connection will allow for aggregate bandwidth of up to 32GB/s — a seriously impressive figure.

Nintendo

Wii 2 Unlikely For 2011, Maybe In 2012 303

An anonymous reader writes "As discussed on Slashdot earlier this year, the lack of a next-generation Wii may be hurting Nintendo. That doesn't seem to concern the company's US chief, Reggie Fils-Aime, who said this week that a Wii 2 might not appear until 2012. He wants to sell a few million more consoles before a successor is launched. So, no Wii 2 for 2010 or 2011 — meanwhile, the PS3 and Xbox consoles get motion control support and other content enhancements. What does that mean for the success of Nintendo's gaming console business? Has the innovator been out-innovated due to a sluggish product roadmap?"
Piracy

Submission + - Anti-piracy lawyers "knew letters hit innocents" (pcpro.co.uk) 1

nk497 writes: A UK legal watchdog has claimed lawyers who sent out letters demanding settlement payments from alleged file-sharers knew they would end up hitting innocent people. The Solicitors Regulators Authority said the two Davenport Lyons lawyers "knew that in conducting generic campaigns against those identified as IP holders whose IP numeric had been used for downloading or uploading of material that they might in such generic campaigns be targeting people innocent of any copyright breach." The SRA also said the two lawyers lost their independence because they convinced right holders to allow them to act on their behalf by waiving hourly fees and instead taking a cut of the settlements. The pair earned £150,000 of the £370,000 collected from alleged file-sharers. Because they were looking to recoup their own costs, the lawyers ignored clients' concerns about the negative publicity the letter campaign could — and eventually did — cause, the SRA claimed.
Linux

Submission + - The ~200 Line Linux Kernel Patch That Does Wonders (phoronix.com)

An anonymous reader writes: There is a relatively miniscule patch to the Linux kernel scheduler being queued up for Linux 2.6.38 that is proving to have dramatic results for those multi-tasking on the desktop. Phoronix is reporting the ~200 line Linux kernel patch that does wonders with before and after videos demonstrating the much-improved responsiveness and interactivity of the Linux desktop. While compiling the Linux kernel with 64 parallel jobs, 1080p video playback was still smooth, windows could be moved fluidly, and there was not nearly as much of a slowdown compared to when this patch was applied. Linus Torvalds has shared his thoughts on this patch: So I think this is firmly one of those "real improvement" patches. Good job. Group scheduling goes from "useful for some specific server loads" to "that's a killer feature".
Security

Stuxnet Was Designed To Subtly Interfere With Uranium Enrichment 334

ceswiedler writes "Wired is reporting that the Stuxnet worm was apparently designed to subtly interfere with uranium enrichment by periodically speeding or slowing specific frequency converter drives spinning between 807Hz and 1210Hz. The goal was not to cause a major malfunction (which would be quickly noticed), but rather to degrade the quality of the enriched uranium to the point where much of it wouldn't be useful in atomic weapons. Statistics from 2009 show that the number of enriched centrifuges operational in Iran mysteriously declined from about 4,700 to about 3,900 at around the time the worm was spreading in Iran."
Security

Submission + - China hijacks internet traffic for 18 minutes (nationaldefensemagazine.org) 2

achyuta writes: Launching attacks on security agencies such as the Pentagon or civilians to gain sensitive information has been on for some time now. But an event which seems to have flown under the radar of the popular press, suggests that the information security war is now being waged by simply taking advantage of the way the internet works. The hostile party literally has the prey sent to them. The vice president of threat research at McAfee, Dmitri Alperovitch says "This is one of the biggest — if not the biggest hijacks — we have ever seen. What happened to the traffic while it was in China? No one knows."
The Internet

Submission + - Professor: Apple The No. 1 Danger To Net Freedom (computerworld.com)

CWmike writes: Columbia law professor Tim Wu, who coined the term 'net neutrality,' now says that Apple is the company that most endangers the freedom of the Internet. Wu recently published the book The Master Switch: The Rise and Fall of Information Empires, in which he details what he calls 'information empires' such as AT&T, NBC, Facebook, and Google. He told The New York Times, 'It's largely a story of the American affection for information monopolists and the consequences of that fondness.' When asked whether the Internet could similarly be controlled by large companies, he told the Times: 'I know the Internet was designed to resist integration, designed to resist centralized control, and that design defeated firms like AOL and Time Warner. But firms today, like Apple, make it unclear if the Internet is something lasting or just another cycle.' Asked which companies he feared most, Wu replied: 'Right now, I'd have to say Apple.'
Businesses

Viacom To Sell Rock Band Creator Harmonix 112

UgLyPuNk tips news that Harmonix, the game developer behind Rock Band and the early Guitar Hero games, will be sold by parent company Viacom, signaling the media conglomerate's exit from the console game market. Quoting Wired: "The news is yet another ominous sign for the music-game business, which exploded seemingly overnight in 2005 with the release of Guitar Hero. ...sales have been in free fall since the dizzying heights of 2008, with Guitar Hero: Warriors of Rock moving only 86,000 copies in its first week... Thus far in calendar year 2010, the balance sheet seems to show that Harmonix has been a $300 million liability for Viacom. And it doesn’t look like Viacom believes in the long-term future of music games. With any luck, the company will find a buyer that can help Harmonix grow, but it’s hard to imagine a better partner in the music biz than MTV."
Businesses

World of Goo Dev Wants Big Publishers To Build Indie Teams 74

Ron Carmel, co-founder of game developer 2D Boy, which created the indie hit World of Goo, gave a speech at Montreal International Games Summit in which he encourages large game publishers to put more time and money into smaller, indie-like teams. Quoting GameSetWatch: "'We need a medium-sized design studio. Something that is larger than a typical indie, but has the same propensity for of talent density, focus, and risk-taking,' said Carmel, formerly an employee of major publisher Electronic Arts prior to going independent. Notably, a focus on profit must be eliminated from the equation. 'Creating this within a major developer doesn't present a problem,' said Carmel. With a budget of $1-$2 million dollars, 10 staffers could be hired to work on 'creatively ambitious and forward-thinking projects.' He likened it to the automobile industry, which alongside its mainstream consumer products works on concept cars — few of which enter production as regular models. The concept car is, said Carmel, 'a marketing expense to build your brand, and say, "Look at all the amazing things we're creating."' It also helps with recruitment. Said Carmel, 'there's no reason the larger game companies can't do that.' He also said that developers must move away from the notion that a team comprised primarily of programmers and artists can create a great work. Why do Valve's games have such amazing environments? Because, said Carmel, 'Valve has architects on staff.'"
Hardware Hacking

Strong Contender Already For Adafruit's Kinect Challenge Screenshot-sm 86

sammyF70 writes "Adafruit's bounty on open source drivers for Microsoft's Kinect may have been already won. Someone called 'KinectMan2' has posted videos of Kinect's output as seen on Windows 7 to YouTube. That was fast. Hopefully Linux drivers are coming soon." A few more details are available on a forum post the man made. Adafruit said the bounty could be his if he posts the source code, and they also upped the reward to $3,000 in response to another silly statement from Microsoft.

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