Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive


Forgot your password?
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Submission + - Open Source alternative to Dropbox?

garry_g writes: While "the cloud" may be one of the major buzzwords of the Internet industry, anybody concerned with security and privacy will most likely not touch it with a 10-foot pole. While I am guilty of using Dropbox for occasional data storage or quick picture snaps with my Android phone, I do watch out not to store anything important on there (or inciminating), no matter what the "privacy policy" may be.
As someone that has been running his personal mail server and MTA for years, stores Firefox profile information not on either Xmarks or FF Sync public server but my own, I was wondering: what useful alternative is there to Dropbox on the FOSS market, which will allow access by both windows/linux boxes, but also mobile devices (specifically Android). I know there are frontend addons for Windows (and linux tools of course) e.g. for SVN, but most likely no implementations for mobile use as far as I can tell...
And, of course, the backend should run on a Linux box ;)

Submission + - New Apple Technology Stops iPhones From Filming Li (

An anonymous reader writes: "A patent application filed by Apple, and obtained by the Times, reveals how the software would work. If a person were to hold up their iPhone, the device would trigger the attention of infra-red sensors installed at the venue. These sensors would then instruct the iPhone to disable its camera."

Submission + - Local TV Could Go the Way of Newspapers

Hugh Pickens writes: "Alan D. Mutter writes on "Reflections of a Newsosaur" that the economics of local broadcasting may begin to unravel as dramatically in the next five years as they did for newspapers in the last five years due to the unparalleled consumer choice made possible by a growing mass of (mostly free) content on the Internet. "Once it becomes as easy and satisfying to view a YouTube video on your 50-inch television as it is to watch “Two and a Half Men,” audiences will fragment to the point that local broadcasters will not be able to attract large quantities of viewers for a particular program at a finite point in time," writes Mutter. The economics of cable TV programming already are geared to serving small but targeted niches but as audiences shatter, those options won’t be available to local broadcasters, who will be deprived of the vast reach that enabled the high ad rates and enviable profits long associated with their businesses. Although barely 8% of US households had access to IPTV in 2009, this technology is likely to be available to some 20% of the more than 100 million homes subscribing to pay-television services in 2014, according to senior analyst Lee Ratliff of iSuppli, a private market research company. "We already have gotten a hint of what the future could hold. Acting to trim spending during the recession, many local stations cut back their news staffs, resulting in a decline in the caliber and depth of their coverage," writes Mutter. "With the gruel we call local TV news already quite thin, our society can ill afford further cutbacks. But this may be the path we are on.""

Submission + - How to Go Broke Selling 0-Days (

Trailrunner7 writes: Despite all of the hand-wringing and moral posturing about the public sale of security vulnerabilities, it turns out that not many people are buying or selling vulns and the ones who are aren't making much money at it. A new survey of security researchers who sell vulnerabilities either publicly or in private, directed sales found that the vast majority of the flaws sell for less than $5,000. And almost none of them sell for much more than $10,000. At those prices, there's little chance that this is going to turn into the chaotic Wild West marketplace that some people predicted. It's a small, mostly controlled market that isn't making anyone rich.

Submission + - Meet The New Voicemail: Google Voice vs. YouMail (

CWmike writes: Looking for a better voicemail service? Web-based voice mail services have been adding features that go beyond just storing your messages online. Most can automatically transcribe recorded messages. And some have evolved into virtual command centers to handle your calling needs, whether it's receiving calls, making them or forwarding them to other phones. Howard Wen reviews four free Web-based voice mail services: Google Voice, Phonebooth, Ribbit Mobile and YouMail. Bottom line: YouMail might lack the neat extras of the other services in this roundup, but you can still use multiple outgoing greetings and assign each to specific phone numbers calling you. Plus, it provides apps for three of the major smartphone platforms. And YouMail is open to all right now.

Journal Journal: Stem Cell-derived bone tissue closes skull injury

The American Society for Cell Biology reports "There are mice in Baltimore whose skulls were made whole again by bone tissue grown from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Healing critical-size defects (defects that would not otherwise heal on their own) in intramembraneous bone, the flat bone type that forms the skull, is a vivid demonstration of new techniques devised by researchers at John Hopkins University to

Slashdot Top Deals

All constants are variables.