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Chrome

Submission + - Opera switching to WebKit rendering engine (opera.com)

Z80xxc! writes: The creators of Opera announced today that the browser now has over 300 million users — and will therefore be switching to webkit.

To provide a leading browser on Android and iOS, this year Opera will make a gradual transition to the WebKit engine, as well as Chromium, for most of its upcoming versions of browsers for smartphones and computers.

With Opera moving to webkit, there will now be only three major web rendering engines: IE's Trident, Mozilla's Gecko, and WebKit — used by Google Chrome and Apple Safari already. What will this mean for the future of compatibility and web standards?

Submission + - UK Government - "Pay a £20 fee to acquit yourself of file-sharing (maybe)" (bbc.co.uk)

Dr_Barnowl writes: The BBC reports that the UK government plans to introduce a £20 fee if you wish to appeal against an allegation of copyright infringement, within 20 days of your accusation. Note that this doesn't guarantee acquittal, as only "excuses" covered in the Digital Economy Act will be valid even for consideration. This scheme could be in place as early as 2014, so John Smith, General Secretary of the Musicians' Union says "We urge ISPs to begin building their systems now and to work constructively with rights holders, Ofcom and government to get notice-sending up and running as soon as possible,". What are the thoughts of Slashdot?
Piracy

Submission + - In the UK, people accused of piracy may have to pay £20 just to refute! (bbc.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: The BBC is carrying a story which reports that under the revised Digital Millenium Rights proposal, people accused of piracy will have to pay £20 to refute the accusation... thin end of the wedge? Britain had for many years upheld a principal of innocent until proven guilty.
Piracy

Submission + - Suspected internet pirates will have 20 working days to appeal (bbc.co.uk)

Dupple writes: Suspected internet pirates will have 20 working days to appeal against allegations of copyright infringement and must pay £20 to do so, according to revised plans to enforce the UK's Digital Economy Act.

The details are contained in secondary legislation presented to Parliament and a draft code published by Ofcom.

Submission + - Kickstarting a Free Textbook (kickstarter.com)

Dr. Evil writes: Back in the day, I had a prof who wrote a text on Optics and sold photocopy editions for $5. We got cheap books and he got feedback to improve them. A friend of a friend is now doing the same for his philosophy students, except he's using Kickstarter to fund the book and offer digital editions free. Is this common? Are other professors doing this? He writes:

If you took a course in philosophy or critical thinking at college or university, you paid an average of $70 for your textbook. I think that's too much, especially for students who have to choose between food and the rent, two or three times a year, like a lot of my students. Yet the cost of these books never goes down, because students are a captive market.

So, I've been writing my own textbook, so that my students don't have to buy one. I'd like to expand and improve it and then make it available to the whole world, for free.

This Kickstarter campaign will allow me to bring in more contributors, get more research resources, and hire designers and artists and translators, so that we can put together a very high quality teaching tool, and make it available to every student in the world.


AMD

Submission + - AMD detonates Trinity: Behold Bulldozer's second coming (extremetech.com) 1

MrSeb writes: "It’s been a turbulent 12 months for AMD. Since the company launched Llano, its first mainstream “Fusion” part, it has replaced its CEO, brought in multiple new executives, debuted a disappointing architecture, delayed its next-generation Brazos parts by a full year, and outlined a comprehensive vision of the future that de-emphasizes cutting-edge process node transitions in favor of re-useable IP blocks that can be shared between multiple SoCs (system-on-a-chip). When it launched last year, Bulldozer ran hot, scaled poorly, and was less efficient than its predecessor. When it came to building Llano’s successor, AMD clearly had its work cut out for it. How does Trinity do, then? Well, on the GPU side it comfortably holds its own against Intel's Ivy Bridge HD-4000, but the Piledriver CPU still doesn't come close to Sandy Bridge, let alone Ivy Bridge. But really, Trinity was never intended to compete directly with Ivy Bridge. AMD’s goal with Trinity is to position the CPU as a successor to Llano, a further fulfillment of the company’s “Fusion” vision, and as an anchor in the popular $400-$700 segment. Based on what we’ve seen today, and a few educated guesses, it’s got a fair chance of pulling it off — short term."

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