Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Compare cell phone plans using Wirefly's innovative plan comparison tool ×

Submission + - JDK 7 Unexpectedly Gets "Simple" Closures (infoq.com)

An anonymous reader writes: During his Devoxx talk, Mark Reinhold has announced that JDK 7 will have Closures. With the inclusion of this much debated feature, JDK 7 schedule will be extended until around September 2010.

This sudden change in plans has made people like Fabrizio Giudici skeptic about the decision process:

I don't want to discuss whether it's a good or a bad thing (you know I think it's bad I suspend any judgment as I understand that the proposal is neither BGGA nor CICE, but something new). I'm only appalled that after a few weeks that the final word of Java 7 had been said with Project Coin (the famous final five or so), somebody changed his mind all of a sudden. What kind of decisional process is this?

Ah, I got it — it's tossing a coin, now I get where the project name came from. I fear Java 7 could be the most chaotical Java release ever — a very good idea if you want to kill it prematurely (as it there weren't already many other sources of entropy, such as the Oracle deal or the Jigsaw / OSGi debate).

Similarly Geertjan Wielenga thinks that the inclusion of Closures was a very unexpected development:

Great news and maybe best if no one asks too many questions about how that process ended up throwing up this solution! First, we have a whole bunch of proposals, all of which get lukewarm reception. Then, suddenly, like a bolt from the blue, we have "simple closures". (I wonder if any of the existing proposals are called "complex closures". Isn't simplicity the whole purpose of closures in the first place?) OK, the closures will be simple in the sense that there will be no non-local return, no control statements, and no access to non-final variables. Still, how was that decision made?


Slashdot Top Deals

Two wrights don't make a rong, they make an airplane. Or bicycles.

Working...