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Crime

Submission + - The latest craze? High-voltage fences promise to zap would-be copper thieves (networkworld.com) 1

coondoggie writes: "It may be a gimmick or maybe the ultimate answer, but a California city this week Ok'd a draft ordinance that would let businesses install 7,000 volt electric fences to protect sites from rampant copper thieves. As reported by the Sacramento CBS station, the reaction form one business owner to the ordinance says it all: "It'll be a little fun to watch one of these guys get electrocuted holding my fence trying to rob me.""
Education

Submission + - Broun: Evolution, big bang theory are "lies straight from the pit of hell" (onlineathens.com)

BigVig209 writes: ""Evolution and the big bang theory are “lies to keep me and all the folks who are taught that from understanding that they need a savior,” U.S. Rep. Paul Broun (Chairman of the Investigations and Oversight Subcommittee for the U.S. House Science, Space, and Technology Committee), said in a recently released video..

In the video, taken from the 2012 Sportsman’s Banquet at Liberty Baptist Church in Hartwell, Broun also repeated fundamentalist Christian tenets that the Earth is less than 10,000 years old and the Holy Bible is a guidebook to every aspect of life."

The Military

Submission + - US Air Force's 1950s supersonic flying saucer declassified (extremetech.com) 2

MrSeb writes: "Tighten the strap on your tinfoil hat: Recently declassified documents show that the US Air Force was working on, and perhaps had already built, a supersonic flying saucer in 1956. The aircraft, which had the code name Project 1794, was developed by the USAF and Avro Canada in the 1950s. One declassified memo, which seems to be the conclusion of initial research and prototyping, says that Project 1794 is a flying saucer capable of “between Mach 3 and Mach 4,” (2,300-3,000 mph) a service ceiling of over 100,000 feet (30,500m), and a range of around 1,000 nautical miles (1,150mi, 1850km). According to declassified cutaway diagrams, the supersonic flying saucer would propel itself by rotating an outer disk at very high speed, taking advantage of the Coand effect. Maneuvering would be accomplished by using small shutters on the edge of the disc (similar to ailerons on a winged aircraft). Power would be provided by jet turbines. According to the cutaway diagrams, the entire thing would even be capable of vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL). The fact that there are no disc-shaped aircraft in the skies today, though, suggests that the USAF's flying saucer efforts probably never got past the prototype stage."
Facebook

Submission + - Google Starts Indexing AJAX/JavaScript content

An anonymous reader writes: Google has started indexing AJAX and JavaScript content. This includes, for example, the Facebook Comments Box many sites use to power their commenting system. Matt Cutts, the head of Google'(TM)s Webspam team, confirmed the news on Twitter: "Googlebot keeps getting smarter. Now has the ability to execute AJAX/JS to index some dynamic comments."
Technology

Submission + - Is the Maker Movement making it cool for kids to b (csmonitor.com)

blackbearnh writes: For most adults into technology, childhood was a alienating experience, pigeon-holed as a nerd and relegated to the A/V, Computer or Gaming club in high school. But according to a Christian Science Monitor article that looks at young Makers, the next generation of tech geeks are social and gaining increasing support for corporate America. Radio Shack is stocking Arduinos, Autodesk bought Instructables, and teens are flocking to local Hackerspaces to learn how to create their own gear. WIRED Geek Dad David Giancaspro, thinks that people's need to create with their own hands is responsible. "As we've moved further and further away from that, towards what people call 'knowledge work,' as opposed to producing something physical, that urge is starting to come back," he says.
Security

Submission + - Researchers defeat CAPTCHA on popular websites (networkworld.com)

alphadogg writes: Researchers from Stanford University have developed an automated tool that is capable of deciphering text-based anti-spam tests used by many popular websites such as Visa and Blizzard's World of Warcraft with a significant degree of accuracy. The researchers, who presented results of their year-and-a-half long CAPTCHA study at the recent ACM Conference On Computer and Communication Security, devised various methods of cleaning up purposely introduced image background noise and breaking text strings into individual characters for easier recognition, a technique called segmentation.
Security

Submission + - US wants cutting-edge, secure chip development (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "The cutting-edge intelligence research development arm of the government wants to take advantage of the world's semiconductor manufacturing capacity but make sure that US security and intellectual property protection is baked in. The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) group is looking to fund development of new, advanced chip-making technology under a program it calls Trusted Integrated Chips. TIC would feature what IARPA calls "split-manufacturing," where fabrication of new chips would be divided into Front-End-of-Line (FEOL) manufacturing consisting of transistor layers to be fabricated by offshore foundries and Back-End-of-Line (BEOL) development that would be fabricated by trusted US facilities."
EU

Submission + - European Commission plans ambitious €100bn fi (telecoms.com)

singinho writes: "The European Parliament and the EU’s Council of Ministers is considering a proposal from the European Commission for an ambitious project, worth up to €100bn ($140bn), to fund the rollout of fibre broadband and associated services across the EU.

The Commission has proposed to spend €9.2bn from 2014 to 2020, to give EU citizens and business access to broadband speeds of 100Mbps. However, this initial €9.2bn will be used to attract additional investment to a total of between €50bn and €100bn, with each Euro spent expected to attract another private investment of between €6 and €15, according to the Commission."

Ubuntu

Submission + - Ubuntu Linux heads to smartphones, tablets, and sm (zdnet.com)

GuerillaRadio writes: Mark Shuttleworth is to announce that Canonical will be taking Ubuntu Linux to smartphones, tablets, and smart TVs at the Ubuntu Developer Summit in Orlando, FL starting today. Shuttleworth said, “This is a natural expansion of our idea as Ubuntu as Linux for human beings. As people have moved from desktop to new form factors for computing, it’s important for us to reach out to out community on these platforms. So, we’ll embrace the challenge of how to use Ubuntu on smartphones, tablets and smart-screens.”

Submission + - Climate Change Skeptic Changes Tune (huffingtonpost.com)

Irishman writes: A leading climate change skeptic, Richard Muller, will release results today showing that global warming is indeed happening. He has shown that two items skeptics look to, urban heat islands and unreliable weather stations, do not skew the data. The amazing part is that this research is funded by the Koch brothers, two investors who fund climate change skeptics whenever possible.
Facebook

Submission + - Facebook Data Retention? (facebook.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: I know that Facebook has been pretty shady with keeping people's data, and is generally all about maximizing what they can retain, but I thought that deleting my account would eliminate everything from them. Now, a year after I deleted my account (full delete, not deactivate), I found reason to rejoin. Surprisingly, when I came back on, Facebook suggested all of my old friends to me again. What gives?
Privacy

Submission + - UK Police by covert cellphone surveillance system (guardian.co.uk) 1

digitig writes: UK Metropolitan Police have purchased a "covert surveillance technology that can masquerade as a mobile phone network, transmitting a signal that allows authorities to shut off phones remotely, intercept communications and gather data about thousands of users in a targeted area."

Other customers apparently include "the US Secret Service, the Ministry of Defence and regimes in the Middle East."

Submission + - Another step towards Graphene semiconductors (arstechnica.com)

derGoldstein writes: Ars has an article up about the two latest "papers demonstrating that, if you change the way the graphene stacks, you obtain a voltage-controlled bandgap ... Between these two papers, a fairly complete understanding of the bandgap behavior in three layer graphene has been obtained, leaving only the challenge of making the stuff".
Space

Submission + - Soyuz-ST launches from Kourou (space-travel.com)

avmich writes: Heralding the end of efforts starting at least in 2003, today the Soyuz-ST rocket carried the Fregat booster and two Galileo satellites to orbit from Kourou spaceport. Fregat performed successfully, and satellites are on their way to participate in the network providing, as some call it, the first non-military geo-navigational service.

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