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Submission + - SPAM: Bulk of melted fuel in Fukushima no. 2 reactor at bottom of pressure vessel

AmiMoJo writes: Most of the melted nuclear fuel inside the No. 2 reactor at the disaster-hit Fukushima No. 1 power plant is likely located at the bottom of its pressure vessel, plant operator TEPCO has revealed. According to a study that used a cosmic ray imaging system, an estimated 130 tons of the so-called fuel debris remains at the bottom of the vessel. A decision on how to remove fuel from the reactors is due by 2017. Reactors 2 and 3 are expected to be flooded with water to make the process easier, but reactor 1 will have to be done dry, which is much more difficult and unprecedented.

Submission + - SpaceX releases video of full 2:30 burn of a used Falcon 9 (morningticker.com)

Peter Hudson writes: SpaceX has so far launched and landed five different Falcon 9 rocket boosters since December 2015, but has not yet reused any of them. Today SpaceX released video of a full two minute and thirty second burn on a used Falcon 9 stage. This is the first time that SpaceX has conducted a burn on a used stage for the full duration of a Falcon 9 first stage boost.

Submission + - Martian gullies not formed by water flow

An anonymous reader writes: Spectroscopy of many of the gullies on Mars strongly suggests that water had nothing to do with their formation, even though these gullies resemble closely similar gullies on Earth that were carved by flowing water..

Color coding in light blue corresponds to surface composition of unaltered mafic material, of volcanic origin. Mafic material from the crater rim is carved and transported downslope along the gully channels. No hydrated minerals are observed within the gullies, in the data from CRISM, indicating limited interaction or no interaction of the mafic material with liquid water. These findings and related observations at about 100 other gully sites on Mars suggest that a mechanism not requiring liquid water may be responsible for carving these gullies on Mars. (Gullies on Mars are a different type of feature than seasonal dark streaks called recurring slope lineae or RSL; water in the form of hydrated salt has been identified at RSL sites.) [emphasis mine]

In other words, these gullies were formed by flowing lava, not water. Considering Mars’s lower gravity, one third that of Earth’s, we should not be surprised if lava is capable of doing things there that it is not generally capable of doing on Earth. In fact, we should remind ourselves constantly that Mars is an alien planet, and that conditions there are different enough to make any predictions based on our knowledge of Earth very unreliable.

Security

Submission + - Windows 8 no longer automatically restarts to inst (extremetech.com)

MrSeb writes: "We have all been victim of the diabolical, automatic 3am Windows Update restart. You might be watching a movie or you might be slaying a boss in World of Warcraft, or perhaps you simply left your computer on over night — perhaps with some unsaved work — and blam! Windows Update strikes. If you're a geek, it only happens once — usually after setting up a new computer and forgetting, yet again, to disable automatic updates — but for most consumers, it's just a fact of Windows life. But not for long! With Windows 8, Microsoft is finally fixing Windows Update to behave a little more sensibly. Starting with Windows 8, Windows Update will consolidate every restart-requiring patch into just one restart, on Patch Tuesday. Secondly, instead of popping up a system tray notification, Windows Update will now use the login screen to tell you, three days in advance, about an impending restart. Finally, Windows 8 will not automatically restart if your computer is locked, running background apps, or if you have any unsaved work. Instead, Windows 8 will wait for your next login and then begin the restart process."
China

Submission + - China breaks ground on largest radio telescope (gizmocrazed.com)

Mightee writes: "The history of telescope is going to be revolutionized as China breaks ground on world's largest radio telescope ever. Previously, radio telescope in Puerto Rico's Arecibo Observatory (located in the northeastern Caribbean Sea) was the world's largest radio telescope.

China's new gigantic radio telescope comprising of a big bowl-shaped radio signal collector, is named as Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) and it will be operational in 2016 according to the Chinese officials."

Submission + - Confessions of a computer repairman (pcpro.co.uk)

nk497 writes: "What really happens to your PC when it's handed over to computer repair cowboys? We reveal the horror stories from computer repair shops — the dodgy technicians that install pirated software, steal personal photos, lie about hardware upgrades, upsell to the unsavvy, or simply steal your PC to sell on. Plus, we tell you how to avoid such dodgy fixers and find a trustworthy repairman."
Linux

Submission + - Shuttleworth to Step Down as Canonical CEO in 2010 (linux.com)

LinuxScribe writes: In a blog announcement today, Canomical Founder and CEO Mark Shuttleworth revealed he will be stepping down from his CEO role to be replaced by current COO Jane Silber. Both execs do not see major strategic changes on the horizon. Silber's official blog and Linux.com each have more details on how the change will be implemented.

Submission + - Data center covers 11-acre roof with solar panels (networkworld.com)

bednarz writes: "i/o Data Centers in Phoenix is starting an ambitious project to cover its roof in solar panels that will provide up to 4.5 megawatts of power to customers. CEO George Slessman says covering the 11-acre data center with thousands of solar panels will cost between $8 million and $10 million. "Right now, it's not really an economic solution if you just do the math," Slessman says. "It's more expensive than just buying the power from the utility, but we really see it as future-proofing the business. Our assumption is that power costs are going to go up drastically over the next five to seven years.""
IT

Submission + - Top 10 Emerging Enterprise Technologies (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "InfoWorld has compiled a list of 10 not yet widely adopted enterprise technologies that will have the greatest impact on IT in the years to come. From whitelisting, to NoSQL, to I/O virtualization, each class of technology is analyzed for its potential to solve significant IT challenges — mobile app dev, power conservation, data glut — over the long haul, as opposed to how it may currently be implemented or how today's iterations currently perform."
Microsoft

Submission + - Are Microsoft to blame for "hidden" malware costs (freesoftwaremagazine.com)

malvert writes: Even the most ardent Windows fan can’t really argue with the fact that their favourite OS has a significantly greater number of malware threats against it than any free software OS will have. The popular reason given for this is the high proportion of Windows boxes makes for a tempting target for the people behind the malware. This is a reasonable argument but it cannot be taken as the only defence here.

If the number of installs is proportional to the number of threats, why have we not seen even a small increase in the number of malware threats against free OS? After all the number of Internet-facing GNU/Linux and *BSD machines around now measures considerably higher than the number for say five years ago. Even allowing for the fact that the percentage of desktop machines using a free OS may not have increased (and I don’t believe that’s a valid argument anyway), the actual number of machines is likely to have increased. Yet we do not see malware writers increasingly targetting free OS users.

When your chosen platform forces you to instruct users to do things in an entirely counter-intuitive way, you need to change your platform

Microsoft

How Microsoft Beats GNU/Linux In Schools 476

twitter writes "Ever wonder why schools still use Windows? Boycott Novell has extracted the details from 2002 Microsoft email presented in the Comes vrs Microsoft case and other leaks. What emerges is Microsoft's desperate battle to 'never lose to Linux.' At stake for Microsoft is more than a billion dollars of annual revenue, vital user conditioning and governmental lock in that excludes competition, and software freedom for the rest of us. Education and Government Incentives [EDGI] and "Microsoft Unlimited Potential" are programs that allows vendors to sell Windows at zero cost. Microsoft's nightmare scenario has already been realized in Indiana and other places. Windows is not really competitive and schools that switch save tens of millions of dollars. Because software is about as expensive as the hardware in these deals, the world could save up to $500 million each year by dumping Microsoft. Now that the cat is out of the bag, it's hard to see what Microsoft can do other than what they did to Peter Quinn."
PC Games (Games)

Why Game Developers Should Support OS X and Linux 283

kevind23 writes "Although Mac OS X and Linux have a small (but growing) market share, Jeff from Wolfire Games argues that supporting non-Windows platforms can lead to a huge increase in game sales. Using their popular game Lugaru as an example, he shows how less-popular platforms, or more specifically, their userbase can be a powerful advertising force. This can lead to a dramatic increase in popularity and exposure, which usually means a large boost in overall sales. The short article is an interesting read, especially for those working in game development and sales."

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