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Comment Re:Removable storage that never gets removed (Score 4, Insightful) 221

I see people complain about this in regards to certain smartphones (looking at you Apple) but I think Apple and you are correct that in 99% of the cases the removable storage adds complexity and cost for a feature that never gets used.

In the case of the iPhone 6S, Apple want from you 749 $ for the 16 GB version and 849 $ for the 64 GB version. Therefore they charge you approximately 2.08 $ per GB. You can buy a cheap UHS class1, 64 GB microSD from Samsung for 21 $ (0.32 $ per GB) or a faster UHS class 3 one from SanDisk for 40 $ (0.63 $ per GB). Moreover, the replaceability of a microSD card means that you don't have to shell more money up front for a bigger device, and you can spend them later if and when the need arises.

So not putting a card slot isn't something that Apple do to reduce the costs for the consumers, they do it to rape their wallets.

Comment Re:Don't Panic (Score 1) 535

It's more complicated than that. Since apparenty the Northern nations weren't happy to pay for Mrs Thatcher's reimbursement, Germany, Austria, the Netherlands, Sweden and Denmark obtained a special exemption, and they pay less for the British rebate. That's why it's up to France, Italy and Spain to pay up.

Comment Re:Don't Panic (Score 4, Insightful) 535

Exactly, the EU zone has only been beneficial to business

Yes, an open market is the best possible condition for creating jobs. That's what anyone with a basic competence in economy says, so there must be some truth in it.

and the Soviet Bloc countries (business moving there for cheap labor and eventually even further east was the whole objective for the forming of the EU). Before the EU and even now, similar business-friendly arrangements have been made amongst European and even Asian countries without any EU government involvement.

So the EU is evil, but also the EU doesn't matter, because rich people will move their businesses to China anyway?

The EU and later on the Euro destroyed the sovereignty of individual nations (now only nations by name only for traditions' sake),

People elect both their local governments and the European parliament. Their local governments nominate the European government and it also has to be approved by the European parliament. And that government has very limited powers to begin with. The EU didn't destroy our sovereignty any more than the administrator of a condominium destroys the flat owners' ownership.

Of course, if member states send into the EU institutions their worst politicians who failed at home, it's a problem. But hardly a fault of the EU.

the Brits were at least smart enough to maintain some of their distance when the Euro came along.

The Brits have, among other things, a religious leader as unelected, unreplaceable Head of State and Lord Spirituals sitting alongside elected members of the Parliament. To each his own.

The EU socialized the losses of its members on a continental scale (Greece etc) while the affluent Western Europe had their middle class evaporate to pay for it and many of those countries (Netherlands, Belgium and France) will soon follow the UK.

The EU budget accounts for 1% of the total taxes paid by European citizens, how can one see its wealth evaporate because of a fluctuation of up to 1% in his expenses? It's globalization what hit the middle class; it has allowed us to pay less for iPhones without automatically giving us back a way to pay for food and housing. But I can hardly see how being a smaller country in the global maket can help fight that.

Plus, this whole "the North paying for the South" subtly racist propaganda is toxic. Britain was the poorest among the big nations when it joined the EEC. Currently, it is France, Italy and Spain who pay for the British rebate and not the other way around.

Comment Re: Rationale aside... (Score 1) 1592

The UK never was in the club really. The joined half-heartedly late in the process, and ever since they never stopped whining about how badly they wanted to leave (as if anybody had forced them to apply for admittance in the first place). Clarity about their true feelings towards the EU was long overdue and finally it has been made. No form of government can exist without the trust of its own people.

Comment Vote for Trump! (Score 4, Interesting) 751

Pretty please! Im Italian and I've spent the last 20 years getting lectured and laughed at because Berlusconi. Now you're on the brink of electing a person so special and unique that Berlusconi is Mother Teresa in comparison. I'll be lighting a candle if you do. Sincerely yours.

Comment Re:You cucks should be deporting millions (Score 1, Interesting) 751

If you had ever read a book on European history, you'd know that Europe ("the West" is a post-WW2 concept) has been at war for thousands of years with itself, often because different portions of the same people couldn't agree on which variety of Christianity was the right one.

And people are no longer making babies because of the shitty socio-economic system that deprives them of the time, resources and willingness to procreate. Fortunately, there's immigrants who are providing fresh manpower to wipe the European's arses when they get old and discover that their iPad retina pros have no app for that.

The last time European nation-states (another relatively recent notion) started raising barbed wire around their borders and brainwashing their citizens about how better and unique and ancient and God-chosen their own culture was, the final results were some 70 million people dead (of their own), thousands of years of history in rubbles, and a country solely made of immigrants to become by far the biggest cultural, political and military power, in the world and possibly in history.

Comment Re:Why IS systemd hated so much? (Score 1) 699

It takes some control away from administrators/developers/users and concentrates it into the distribution maintainer. Most people appreciate this, because they like to work less, some people don't, because they like to fix things themselves when they break, to use their system in a manner that the distribution maintainer hasn't planned, or to know the details of how the system works.

In practice, you can't avoid it if you want to use the most common userspaces for Linux. The average user won't care about its presence per se.

Comment A relic from the past (Score 4, Interesting) 315

The set of characters present on many European keyboards was defined by the ancient localized ASCII encodings, ISO 646. Yes, there were non-US versions of ASCII, that contained funny characters in the lower 7 bit range. This allowed for a very limited amount of regional characters (around 10), and as a result many useful characters were omitted, such as uppercase variants and precise diacritics. This is not only a problem for the French, and it isn't due to the AZERTY/QWERTY difference.

Comment Re:Former Linux/Firefox user now using W10/Edge. (Score 5, Informative) 250

In which ways do you find that the Edge UI is better than Firefox's? In Edge, you can't drag-and-drop files, so you need to resort to Windows 3.1-era browse dialog boxes if you need to choose a file. You can't download files properly either: downloads will stop when you close the browser window, there's absolutely no way of knowing how fast you are downloading, and when the downloads finish, they silently open BEHIND the browser window. The UI has the same nature as that of the Lynx browser, that is text lines, but it has much fewer features and it's perhaps even less intuitive: the text-only links that make up the UI are actually hidden behind cryptic hieroglyphs and when you need a feature, assuming it's one of the few features that Edge actually supports, you have to hunt for it by clicking those pictograms to find out that they reveal hidden surfaces, sliding tabs and other incoherent, undiscoverable UI elements. I really can't understand what's to like in that browser, nor how a browser so limited and buggy could ever be released as part of a paid product. Even searching for text can cause Edge to crash on my machine. And even when it doesn't crash, the text search thingy remains stuck open even if you change tab or close the current one. It's as if the developers hadn't tested even the basic use cases of a browser (searching for text, downloading a file) before releasing it as a supposedly finished application.

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